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2 votes

"The Bag of My Sister's" vs "The Bag of My Sister" - double possessive

Very often, people indicate possession of, or association with, a thing by a person either with 'of' - the coat of my sister, or a possessive apostrophe and an 's' - my sister's coat. Either of these ...
Michael Harvey's user avatar
2 votes

What would you call people from Gaul?

A native of Gaul was called a Gaul and the adjective to describe them was Gallic. Google does turn up examples of 'Gaulian' being used for natives of Gaul; however, the majority of the results are for ...
Astralbee's user avatar
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6 votes

What would you call people from Gaul?

The (modern English) demonym for people from the area named by the Romans as Gallia (or Gaul) is Gauls in the plural (‘The Gauls were a Celtic tribe that lived in what is modernly called France’), or ...
Jeff Zeitlin's user avatar
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1 vote

Cut off and cutoff/cut-off

You're right that "cutoff" is a closed compound noun. "Cut off" can be used as a verb phrase; however, Cambridge Dictionary notes that 'cut-off' (hyphenated) is an acceptable form ...
Astralbee's user avatar
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1 vote

your many books, Those some people - can we use determiners this way?

{possessive} many books can refer to books owned by, once owned by, written by, in the possession of, in the custody of, and so on. many is a synonym for numerous in this construction. The shop's ...
TimR's user avatar
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3 votes

your many books, Those some people - can we use determiners this way?

The first two examples are both grammatically fine but mean very different things: "I have your many books". means the person being spoken to has (written, presumably) many books, and the ...
Astralbee's user avatar
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