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2

Do not confuse collective nouns (also called group nouns) with mass nouns (also called uncountable or noncount nouns). Some collective nouns are mass nouns, but not all. These are different qualities with different implications. When it comes to pluralization, it does not matter whether a noun is collective or not. It only matters whether it is countable ...


4

A collective noun indicates a collection or group, but where there are several different groups, a plural form may be used. France deployed seven armies on its borders at the start of World War One. There are three prides of lions in this nature reserve. There were once four different herds of buffalo in this area. Crowds are prone to mob ...


1

Yes, absolutely – sentences like "the two armies met on the field of battle" or "crowds of protesters surged into the street" are quite common.


2

Well, Frank Thomas has already answered in a comment but According to the Cambridge Dictionary fan someone who admires and supports a person, sport, sports team, etc He's an avid football fan. Just replace "football" by "baseball" in the example. There is even a movie starring Robert DeNiro about a baseball lover titled The Fan.    &...


0

"Baseball fan" would be the obvious expression, but there is nothing wrong with "baseball lover". The noun would be "baseball maniac". I wouldn't use that. It sounds like someone who is actually insane


0

The words demonym and ethnonym are both fairly recent words, but they are based on classical Greek roots. The -onym suffix indicates the name or word for something. Demonym derives from demos, meaning community or region, and ethnonym derives from ethnos, meaning nation or tribe. There's not a direct correlary to "religion" but the word pístis means faith ...


0

Your first sentence is OK (it adds the quality of the adjective 'good' to the noun 'throw'). As for the second sentence, you can't modify a noun with an adverb ('well') it is only possible to modify a verb with it. Fortunately, by addition of a verb you can transform that sentence into: Your throw was well performed.


2

The first one is actually correct. Here, "throw" is acting as a noun, so you want the adjective (good) rather than the adverb. Your hint here is "your," which always comes before nouns. Another way to think about is "Your action is good." Action is always a noun, so obviously it uses the adjective. And a throw is a specific action.


1

The OP is correct, this should be "confections". A "blockbuster confection" here is a specific film, a member of the category, not the category as a whole. Thus "confection" acts here as a countable noun, and should agree in number. Note that the illustrative quote under sense 4 is the play was merely an ingenious confection and the use of "an" ...


-1

In this sentence, "sorry" is actually a quoted word, and it can be anything. I can even be an entire sentence. Saying "Tomorrow will rain" will not make you smaller. However, in different sentences, it is an adjective (possibly with the value of an adverb). I am sorry. The noun associated with "sorry" is most likely "apology". Please accept my ...


0

"Have been waiting" is a verb in the present perfect progressive tense, also called the present perfect continuous tense. This tense is formed by combining "has been" or "have been" with the present participle of a verb. In this case, "waiting" is the present participle of "to wait". The present perfect progressive/continuous tense is normally used to ...


2

I'm not entirely sure what you mean by "BE", but yes it in very common to describe a human as an object. It is usually used as a description where the properties of said object fit the description you would like to use. The third example you've given is slightly different. As opposed to saying I'm not a house, property here is defined as "belonging to". ...


-1

Yes. Using the article the in this sentence definitely makes it grammatically better than the original.


2

As a BE native, the things that office workers use for getting past security or through electronically locked doors is usually called 'a pass' or an 'I.D. Badge' or an 'Identity Badge' - the latter two normally if it's got a photograph of the bearer on it. Quite often in BE it might even be shortened to just 'I.D.'. Sometimes it'll be called 'a token' or 'a ...


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