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125

It's: one hundred quintillion or: a hundred quintillion The words for very large numbers If you're wondering how to form other huge numbers like this, here's the pattern: A thousand thousands is a million: 1,000,000. A thousand millions is a billion: 1,000,000,000. A thousand billions is a trillion: 1,000,000,000,000. A thousand trillions is a ...


81

TL;DR Your friend is incorrect. It's not *tpelf with p, but tƿelf with ƿ—Wynn—which was the Old English (OE) letter to represent the phoneme /w/. So twelve was tƿelf 1. Twenty was tƿēntiȝ 2. Two was tƿā 3. Historical prelude to W The letter that looks like a P is actually: Ƿ (ƿ) It's called Wynn which was a runic letter in Old English alphabet for the ...


68

Both are possible, although the former would normally employ a hyphen. When used as an adjective, 2-byte refers to size of something: The computer's memory is organized into 2-byte words. The token is stored as a 2-byte variable. This will need to be stored as a 2-byte character. When used as a plural noun, the 2 is simply a quantifier. However, in ...


61

This sentence as it stands is incorrect. You say either of these: A $2,000 item. (A two-thousand-dollar item.) $2,000 worth of items. (Two-thousand dollars worth of items.) In the first case, you're talking about a single item that is worth $2,000, so you use "a" and you don't say "worth of". In this case, "dollar" is a descriptive adjective the ...


58

The answer depends on the exact wording. If you say exactly what you wrote, "One cake is good but four is/are better", then the correct answer is "are". There's an implied "cakes" after "four", "four CAKES are better". "Four cakes" is clearly plural, so you should use the plural verb. But now make a ...


43

Historical accident. First derives from the same root as fore, before, in the superlative grade—it meant, originally, “fore-est”, that is ‘foremost’. Second derives from Latin secundus, originally a participial form of sequor meaning ‘following’ All the others derive from a common Proto-Indo-European ending -tos, ...


41

10/9 is never used in English to mean 9 out of 10 9/10 is used because the "/" sign means divide and if you get 9 points out of 10 (9/10) then you have a score of 9 divided by 10 (which is 0.9) or 90% (i.e., multiply by 100 %, which is equivalent to 1) Sometimes, you see a larger number first (e.g., 10/9), but this still means 10 out of 9. This occurs in ...


36

Wikipedia lists large scale numbers here. As only the 10x with x= multiples of 3 get their own names, you read 100,000,000,000,000,000,000 as 100 * 1018, so this is 100 quintillion in American and British English and 100 trillion in most (non-English speaking) other places. (Practical approach: The different naming patterns for large numbers obviously ...


35

I would tend towards is in this case, because to me the underlying meaning of this sentence is "(having) One cake is good, but (having) 4 is better" Using are here sounds vaguely off to me for that reason.


34

In the United States, when writing a check, it's customary to write and 00/100 or and no/100 or and xx/100 before "dollars" to indicate that no cents are to be added beyond the indicated number of dollars. Sometimes people also follow this custom when writing a contract. The "/100" refers to cents, since there are 100 cents in a dollar. Sometimes people ...


33

@Catija's answer is very close and covers the major points, but slightly wrong. Which is the correct way here? A two-thousand dollar/dollars worth of items. Neither. You're treating 'worth' as the subject of your sentence and acting like it's countable, but it's not. 'Worth' is treated in English as a single abstract quality, like '...


32

I'm afraid - neither! Use billions when you don't have a perfect figure and you want to say that roughly. In (the year) 2000, the Coca-Cola company sold billions of bottles But you said that you have a figure. Then it's more natural if you write - In (the year) 2000, the Coca-Cola company sold 17 billion bottles In general cases, we prefer to use ...


30

U.S. currency is denominated with "$" prefix, and many Americans would simply find the missing "$" confusing, as it is always written that way in informal contexts. The "USD" clarifies which "$", e.g. not Canadian, Australian, etc. Edit: In the world of business and international trade, you could leave out the "$&...


29

Fractional part is both used in mathematics and other fields where such things are discussed, and easily understood by lay readers.


29

Either of the ways that you show, but if you are spelling them as they are said, this is consistent: "zero point one percent" (written 0.1%) "one thousandth". (written 1/1000 or 0.001) You can also say "one part per thousand" (1 PPT).


26

In this case, "double zero" is a singular noun referring to two zeros. So you'd say: There's a double zero. If you're referring to multiple zeros in plural, you'd use "zeros": There are two zeros. Zeroes is a verb meaning to adjust to zero. For example, taring a scale: I zeroed the scale. He zeroes the scale.


26

The <new value> is ten times the <old value>. For example, The character's IQ is ten times the character's INT rating.


26

With very new terms like this, there little established use, and a lot of variation between speakers. As far as I can tell, this was the one-thousand-two-hundred-seventy-third mRNA substance that was tested, so reading as number "one thousand...three" is arguably "correct" But that is "a mouthful", so most speakers will reduce ...


25

Typical use would be one of the following: "First of all," for the first point and "Second," for the second point. "First of all," for the first point and "Secondly," for the second point. "First," for the first point and "Second," for the second point. "Firstly," for the first point and "Secondly," for the second point. (Less common.) So your analysis ...


25

The fractional part of a number is known as the Mantissa. The mantissa is defined as the positive fractional part of a real number. Your suggestion of decimal places is usually used to specify a number of digits that must follow the decimal point. The term mantissa makes no such restriction. It defines all the digits after the decimal point.


25

If you want a term similar to percent, but ten times smaller, it's per mille, denoted by ‰ sign. So, 0.1%=1‰.


23

You have several options: one point five one and a half one and one-half - can seem wordy. one and five-tenths - mathematically correct term, not used regularly. These are all correct. The hyphens in the last two are optional to some degree depending on the source. Including it is arguably more correct. one and half is not correct... usually. Based on ...


23

Often, we can use a compound hyphenated adjective as an alternative to a longer phrase meaning the same thing. The correct choice may depend on the level of the writing - more technical readers may understand at once what a '128-bit key' is, especially if the idea has been explained already. A hundred-tonne load A load of one hundred tonnes A 128-bit key A ...


22

If you want to pronounce it the way the experts in the industry would, including the scientists and clinicians who developed, researched, and actually named it, then it's "twelve seventy-three". From my personal experience, though I haven't been personally involved in the development of this vaccine, I work in clinical trials of experimental drugs ...


20

The other answers may actually say this, but they are long and convoluted, and I don't see this in either of them.  So I'll just say it: You don't use an article when you're using a name. Cases where an article is part of the name, like The Hague, The White House, The Lord of the Rings, or An American in Paris, appear to be exceptions, but aren't, really....


20

I don't know who told you that you can't use umpteen before million. M-W's Student Dictionary seems to disagree with that assertion: umpteen (adj) numerous but not fixed in amount : umpteen million things to do So, grammatically, I don't find anything wrong with your translation. That said, umpteen is an informal word in English – note how Macmillan ...


19

You could say, "Pick a number from one to ten". This is usually understood to be inclusive - going from A to Z doesn't mean you start at B and end at Y, and working from Monday to Friday doesn't mean working only three days a week. Or, if you want to be extremely precise, say "Pick a number from one to ten, inclusive".


17

In English words are pluralized only if they are used as nouns, so if we pluralize a number, we treat it like a noun: My telephone number contains three fours. Thus if you say: twelve thousands, three hundreds, and forty-five apples this would mean you have only 45 apples, and that you also have 12 thousands, and 3 hundreds. Of course, this wouldn't make ...


17

It's a bit mathematical so I don't know if would work in your case, but you could say it's an "order of magnitude" higher. Orders of magnitude are used to make approximate comparisons. If numbers differ by 1 order of magnitude, x is about ten times different in quantity than y. If values differ by 2 orders of magnitude, they differ by a factor of about ...


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