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84 votes
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Was "twelve" pronounced as "TPELF"?

TL;DR Your friend is incorrect. It's not *tpelf with p, but tƿelf with ƿ—Wynn—which was the Old English (OE) letter to represent the phoneme /w/. So twelve was tƿelf 1. Twenty was tƿēntiȝ 2. Two was ...
Void's user avatar
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80 votes
Accepted

"Once, twice, thrice,...", what comes next?

As others have stated in the comments, you would continue like this: Once Twice / a couple of times / two times Thrice / three times Four times Five times Six times Seven times Eight times Nine times ...
3N1GM4's user avatar
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70 votes
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Do you say “2 Byte” or “2 Bytes”?

Both are possible, although the former would normally employ a hyphen. When used as an adjective, 2-byte refers to size of something: The computer's memory is organized into 2-byte words. The ...
J.R.'s user avatar
  • 110k
61 votes

$2,000 worth of items: "two thousand dollar" or "dollars"?

This sentence as it stands is incorrect. You say either of these: A $2,000 item. (A two-thousand-dollar item.) $2,000 worth of items. (Two-thousand dollars worth of items.) In the first ...
Catija's user avatar
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61 votes

"Four is better" vs "Four are better". Which one is correct?

The answer depends on the exact wording. If you say exactly what you wrote, "One cake is good but four is/are better", then the correct answer is "are". There's an implied "...
Jay's user avatar
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51 votes
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How do you read "10/10"?

The traditional way to say that meaning of 10/10 is "ten out of ten". The literal meaning is that something has received a score of 10 out of a maximum possible score of ten. In the phrase &...
Dan Getz's user avatar
  • 4,439
41 votes

Is 10/9 ever used to mean "9 out of 10"?

10/9 is never used in English to mean 9 out of 10 9/10 is used because the "/" sign means divide and if you get 9 points out of 10 (9/10) then you have a score of 9 divided by 10 (which is 0.9) or 90%...
michael's user avatar
  • 1,166
40 votes

"Once, twice, thrice,...", what comes next?

once twice thrice and then there were none
Peter's user avatar
  • 66.2k
36 votes

"Four is better" vs "Four are better". Which one is correct?

I would tend towards is in this case, because to me the underlying meaning of this sentence is "(having) One cake is good, but (having) 4 is better" Using are here sounds vaguely off to me ...
steffishnz's user avatar
34 votes

Do digits after the decimal point have a specific name?

Fractional part is both used in mathematics and other fields where such things are discussed, and easily understood by lay readers.
Jon Hanna's user avatar
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34 votes
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$2,000 worth of items: "two thousand dollar" or "dollars"?

@Catija's answer is very close and covers the major points, but slightly wrong. Which is the correct way here? A two-thousand dollar/dollars worth of items. Neither. You're treating '...
lly's user avatar
  • 4,901
33 votes

Why is zero plural?

That is just how the language works. All numbers except exactly 1 are plural. Note that -1 can also be singular, but that depends on the context and dialect. Examples 0 books 0.1 books 1.5 books 1 ...
Drupal guy's user avatar
30 votes
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How do I say "1/1000"?

Either of the ways that you show, but if you are spelling them as they are said, this is consistent: "zero point one percent" (written 0.1%) "one thousandth". (written 1/1000 or 0.001) You ...
Jack O'Flaherty's user avatar
30 votes

"$x USD" vs. "x USD": does the $ serve any purpose?

U.S. currency is denominated with "$" prefix, and many Americans would simply find the missing "$" confusing, as it is always written that way in informal contexts. The "USD&...
dkamins's user avatar
  • 932
28 votes

Do digits after the decimal point have a specific name?

The fractional part of a number is known as the Mantissa. The mantissa is defined as the positive fractional part of a real number. Your suggestion of decimal places is usually used to specify a ...
Chenmunka's user avatar
  • 8,146
26 votes

mRNA-1273 vaccine: How do you say the “1273” part aloud?

With very new terms like this, there little established use, and a lot of variation between speakers. As far as I can tell, this was the one-thousand-two-hundred-seventy-third mRNA substance that was ...
James K's user avatar
  • 226k
24 votes

How do I say "1/1000"?

If you want a term similar to percent, but ten times smaller, it's per mille, denoted by ‰ sign. So, 0.1%=1‰.
Ruslan's user avatar
  • 557
23 votes
Accepted

128-bit vs 128 bits

Often, we can use a compound hyphenated adjective as an alternative to a longer phrase meaning the same thing. The correct choice may depend on the level of the writing - more technical readers may ...
Michael Harvey's user avatar
22 votes
Accepted

mRNA-1273 vaccine: How do you say the “1273” part aloud?

If you want to pronounce it the way the experts in the industry would, including the scientists and clinicians who developed, researched, and actually named it, then it's "twelve seventy-three&...
K. A. Buhr's user avatar
21 votes
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English equivalent to the German "zig"

I don't know who told you that you can't use umpteen before million. M-W's Student Dictionary seems to disagree with that assertion: umpteen (adj) numerous but not fixed in amount : umpteen million ...
J.R.'s user avatar
  • 110k
18 votes

"Once, twice, thrice,...", what comes next?

Anyone who plays DROD knows it's: Thrice Quarce Quince Sence Septence Octence Novence Tonce Edit: Just to clarify, these are - indeed - protologisms. In DROD, they're used to indicate room ...
Writhe's user avatar
  • 323
18 votes
Accepted

Which number is "four and forty thousand"?

It's an old-fashioned way to say "forty four thousand". This way of counting comes from the Germanic languages. German, Dutch keep using it, but in modern English it's considered outdated.
Andrew Tobilko's user avatar
18 votes

Does this refer to the original or sale price? W: "How much were they?" M: "70 dollars. I got them on sale. They were 30% off."

There's clear context here - the question is preceded by the statement "I like your shoes". The pronoun 'they' in the question must refer to that particular pair, because 'they' always ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 105k
17 votes

128-bit vs 128 bits

Has Hyphen Is Singular Type of Word x-bit yes yes adjective 1 bit - yes noun y bits - - noun x is any number y is any number except 1 The chart above is basically true for most countable nouns in ...
Panzercrisis's user avatar
  • 1,297
16 votes

mRNA-1273 vaccine: How do you say the “1273” part aloud?

Yeah, you're right. It's usually pronounced m R N A one two seven three (each letter separately), but can also be pronounced in other ways (such as one thousand, two hundred, and seventy-three as @...
Void's user avatar
  • 18.1k
13 votes

How do you read "10/10"?

This is a common way of writing a score, and we would say "ten out of ten". This could mean that ten questions were set and you got ten right (eg "I got ten out of ten on my school test!...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 105k
13 votes

Does this refer to the original or sale price? W: "How much were they?" M: "70 dollars. I got them on sale. They were 30% off."

Both interpretations are possible. Normally I'd assume the person meant that he paid $70, i.e. that that is the price after getting 30% off, so that the original price was $100. As a math question, ...
Jay's user avatar
  • 67.1k
12 votes

Do you say “2 Byte” or “2 Bytes”?

To add to J.R.'s answer, note that in English, adjectives never change their form. Thus, any noun which is being used as an adjective cannot use its plural form. In addition, compound adjectives (...
Scott Severance's user avatar
12 votes
Accepted

Why ordinal number has been used in "fourth helpings at every meal"?

You are correct that "four helpings every meal" probably makes more sense. This particular use refers to the common idiomatic expression "second helping", meaning a second portion of whatever was ...
Andrew's user avatar
  • 88.4k

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