Hot answers tagged

81

TL;DR Your friend is incorrect. It's not *tpelf with p, but tƿelf with ƿ—Wynn—which was the Old English (OE) letter to represent the phoneme /w/. So twelve was tƿelf 1. Twenty was tƿēntiȝ 2. Two was tƿā 3. Historical prelude to W The letter that looks like a P is actually: Ƿ (ƿ) It's called Wynn which was a runic letter in Old English alphabet for the ...


29

U.S. currency is denominated with "$" prefix, and many Americans would simply find the missing "$" confusing, as it is always written that way in informal contexts. The "USD" clarifies which "$", e.g. not Canadian, Australian, etc. Edit: In the world of business and international trade, you could leave out the "$&...


26

With very new terms like this, there little established use, and a lot of variation between speakers. As far as I can tell, this was the one-thousand-two-hundred-seventy-third mRNA substance that was tested, so reading as number "one thousand...three" is arguably "correct" But that is "a mouthful", so most speakers will reduce ...


23

Often, we can use a compound hyphenated adjective as an alternative to a longer phrase meaning the same thing. The correct choice may depend on the level of the writing - more technical readers may understand at once what a '128-bit key' is, especially if the idea has been explained already. A hundred-tonne load A load of one hundred tonnes A 128-bit key A ...


22

If you want to pronounce it the way the experts in the industry would, including the scientists and clinicians who developed, researched, and actually named it, then it's "twelve seventy-three". From my personal experience, though I haven't been personally involved in the development of this vaccine, I work in clinical trials of experimental drugs ...


17

Has Hyphen Is Singular Type of Word x-bit yes yes adjective 1 bit - yes noun y bits - - noun x is any number y is any number except 1 The chart above is basically true for most countable nouns in English in general. This includes nouns like "dog", "cat", "house", "car", "person", etc. In your question, ...


16

Yeah, you're right. It's usually pronounced m R N A one two seven three (each letter separately), but can also be pronounced in other ways (such as one thousand, two hundred, and seventy-three as @KRyan pointed out in a comment). A cursory search for mRNA 1273 on Youglish yielded one video where the speaker pronounces it m R N A one two seven three.


12

I would say it as 'twelve seventy three' for conciseness.


12

Strictly, no it doesn't. The "USD" itself means "United States Dollar", in the same way that "CAD" means "Canadian Dollar" or "AUD" means "Australian Dollar" and in their original places of use, such as Forex trading, wouldn't be written with symbols. Part of it was that while the character sets we ...


9

The hyphenated phrase “128-bit” is, all together, an adjective. The hyphen indicates that it is being used in this manner. As an adjective, it modifies the noun “key.” These kinds of hyphenated adjectival phrases are very common, often with units of measure (“128-bit,” “12-inch,” “100-gram,” “5-hour,” and so on), and they always use the singular form of the ...


7

No, it doesn't, and is a mistake of the same kind as saying "ATM machine" (automatic teller machine machine), or "PIN number" (personal identification number number). It's a combination of sloppiness and not knowing that "D" in USD stands for "dollar". It's been made significantly worse through the sloppy coding ...


6

When talking about a house, if another house is "opposite", it means it's directly across the street. There's no implication about what the house number of the other house is, only that its location is on the other side of the street.


5

You're using a select subset of many definitions for figure, number, and digit. A digit is a single numeral (0-9), like the digit 5 in the number 5, or the digit 5 in the number 2507. A number can have one or more digits, like 7 or 2507 or 2,507.38. A figure can be a shape, a diagram, or a number; if used to describe a number, it can be composed of a single ...


4

A figure is something that is drawn, which might be digit. A figure can also be a number or amount, for example in this dialogue: We will need to pay them off. What figure do you have in mind? I suggest 10,000 should be enough. A digit is a single number in the range 0 to 9. It is the same word for fingers/thumbs and toes, of which we have 10 each. ...


4

I find it clearer to read, and worry that some readers might not know what "USD" means there, or not notice that it is a price because they are used to seeing the dollar sign. So I choose to write both the $ and the USD. The $ makes it stand out and register as a price easily, and is understood by all. The extra USD then clarifies that I mean U....


4

$x USD is redundant and thus kind of annoying, but not wrong wrong like "knots per hour" or "rate of speed", and partially justified for the sake of clarity (as many redundancies are) since as others have said, there are many $'s, some of them not even "dollars". If you're reading it, sigh and move on. If you're writing it, try ...


3

As an adjective it is hyphenated: a 3-bedroom apartment an 18-inch tire a 128-bit key 99-bit security As a noun it is not hyphenated: an apartment with 3 bedrooms a tire with diameter of 18 inches a key with length of 128 bits security with strength of 99 bits In titles and in advertising it is often ignored.


3

The correct choice is nearly always 'bit', not 'bits', and you would include the hyphen. In your example of "128-bit security", '128-bit' is a compound noun acting as an adjective, effectively describing the level of encryption technology providing the security. A comparable example would be "a 12-inch pizza". We never say "12 inches ...


3

I'm not even going to count We don't use -illion for numbers like this (except as a joke) We use "million, billion and trillion" for some very large amounts (usually large amounts of money). Higher terms like "quadrillion" etc are very rare. For numbers that are too large to write never occur in normal converstation. In a scientific or ...


3

A "share" is a fraction of ownership of a company. The ownership of this company has been divided into 24 parts. So each share is 1/24 (one twenty-fourth) of the company. This person owns 13 such shares. This means that they own over half the company. They have a controlling stake, and can overrule any other shareholders at the company meetings.


3

In modern English, we give the largest amounts first and then work down. "Ten thousand three hundred eight-five", NOT "eighty-five, three hundred, and ten thousand". I have seen the smaller numbers given first in old books. Hundreds of years ago apparently English-speakers did say things like "six and twenty". But that's just ...


3

In the US AND should ONLY be used when there is a Decimal point, as in dollars & cents For example: $200.02 =two hundred dollars and two cents 200.002 = two hundred AND two Thousandths 202,000 = two hundred two thousand .202 = two hundred two Thousandths ( no and !! ) Also by the same rule there should be NO AND's in any years: 2001 = two thousand ...


2

In the case of kilowatt (kW), three forms appear: The device dissipates 1 kW of power. The device dissipates a power of 1 kW. The device dissipates 1 kW. (power is implied by the name of the unit) You can verify that all three forms appear by searching for them, in the Google search bar and at Google books. The same forms appear for current (ampere or A), ...


2

A very simple explanation: 128-bit is together an adjective that describes a characteristic of something, for example: "We use 128-bit encryption." ... where "128-bit" is the adjective describing the noun "encryption". "128 bits" is a number followed by a noun. It together describes the number (amount) of bits ...


2

At first it looks like this is the practice? only seen in the U.S, but since Rich commented there are a few countries using dollars, so I googled by "$100AUD" and "&100NZD". Australia From this site,, It says $100AUD. New Zealand From this site, The banknote is called "$100 NZD" The U.S From this site, So when there are ...


1

There's no single correct way to read a street address aloud. Every person has a particular style they prefer, and the same person might use different formats for different addresses or in different circumstances. That said, a four-digit street number—which is probably the most common length in most parts of the country outside New England—is commonly read ...


1

The word million can be used as a noun or an adjective in English. million In your example "million" is an adjective. We don't pluralise adjectives Let us substitute a different adjective. We will substitute "good" for "million". [Stack Overflow has] more than 31 good answers, compared to 11 good for the rest of the network. &...


1

Whereas the Latin alphabet has been used for English from the earliest times, the numerals are relatively late. In early Middle English there were words for one, two, three (etc) but there was no word for "zero", as the symbol hadn't yet arrived in England (from India, via Arabia and Italy), and even when the symbols did arrive, they were, at ...


1

When we say "imply" it means that we can be certain, and in this case we can't be certain. So it does not imply it is the same woman. For example: I eat an apple everyday. Does not mean it is the same apple. The apple example is unambigous. But your example looks much more ambiguous. It is possible to have nearly married the same woman on two ...


1

To my ear the sentence is slightly ambiguous, though most people in most situations would assume the first meaning rather than the second in the absence of additional information. However, if your audience has some prior reason to think that you did indeed fall at least once yesterday (e.g., you have been discussing your injuries), then the second meaning ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible