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32

This is a mistake, perhaps the result of hypercorrection on the part of the writer. As the object of the preposition for, the pronoun I should actually be me. A grammatically correct version of the sentence would read as: And in order for you, me, or any other end user to access the database engine, we need to go through some sort of database ...


21

All your examples are grammatically correct. I haven't collected statistics but I'd guess "her homework" is most commonly used. You could certainly say that "her" is not required, as the reader is unlikely to suppose that she does someone else's homework. I have an intuitive feel that "she does homework every day" sounds like it's saying that she has a lot ...


16

His driving the car isn't wrong. The book might be wrong. It depends on whether the book is talking about nouns in particular. Gerund-participle clauses We can use a gerund-participle clause in many of the same situations where we use noun phrases. We can use them as Subjects, Objects and as the Complements of prepositions. A gerund-participle clause is a ...


11

Because it is not the subject of the sentence. This is an imperative (a command or directive), given to the listener. The you is ellipted, because it's understood by both parties that the second is receiving an instruction from the first. Make it happen. You make it happen. These two sentences have the same meaning (when given as commands). It wouldn't ...


10

Your suggestions are sound. Most people think [that] she is at the peak of her career. She's an actress who most people think is at the peak of her career. The objective form "whom" is not appropriate here. It doesn't function as the object of to think. That role is filled by the entire subordinate clause. The role relevant to this word choice ...


8

Part 1 Subjects: Words, Phrases and Functions To make this section of the answer easier to think about, let's look at an even simpler example: There's a new president. The number one question here is: What is the subject of this sentence? This isn't as easy as it looks. If we want to answer this question we need to really understand what a subject is. ...


8

If you're asked a question with a transitive verb that takes an object: Do you like football? you may safely convey your answer using something called "ellipsis," i.e., the omission of words that your reader or listener will supply from the context: No. No, I don't. But if you repeat the verb but omit the object No, I don't like. it will sound ...


8

I think that this is confusing because you're using your and my when we already have a word our which would normally be preferred. For this reason the sentence is a little awkward, because it's not really clear why the writer has decided to not use our here. If you want to use your and my for emphasis, which you certainly could do, then it would be a good ...


7

When a pronoun is the object of "for", it must be in the appropriate case. English doesn't have cases like some other languages, but it has something similar to cases in the pronouns: case pronoun example nominative he; she; I He is here. I am fine. possessive his; her(s); my, mine Is that my pen or ...


7

In this case I would not use to but there's more to it than that. When you say come it implies that you're referring to the place you are in. And when you say there it implies that you're referring to somewhere else than where you are. So neither is really correct but if you switch out come with go, or there with here, it will change, for example. Are ...


7

or is the object her required? I wouldn't call her an object, but rather a pronoun that modifies the object homework. It's not required for grammatical correctness, but in practice the version with the pronoun has a connotation of all of the subject's homework, while the version without is more indefinite. She does homework every day. At least in ...


6

Denis, look up this article: "Ditransitive Verb". A ditransitive verb can have two objects, one direct, one indirect. They are also called primary and secondary. In the sentence I gave Tom a cup. Cup is the direct object, and Tom, the indirect.


6

They have different meanings. She does homework every day. This means that every day she does at least some homework. It neither says nor implies that she completes her homework (because it doesn't specify what homework it's talking about). It's also perfectly consistent with her doing other people's homework. (For example, she might be a nanny who, ...


6

The verb answer is normally used either without any Complements, or with a Direct Object: "Yes", she answered. (no Complement) Answer the question. (with Direct Object, the question) I answered him. (with Direct Object him) Answer the phone. (with Direct Object phone) When answer means to respond as in the sentences above, it does not take preposition ...


5

2. "There" is a dummy pronoun. A simple diagnostic test that demonstrates that the existential "there" word is a pronoun is to show that it can occur as the subject in an interrogative tag. For example: "There was a cat under the table, wasn't there?" Only pronouns can be used as a subject in an interrogative tag like the one ...


5

Highlighted sentence is not complete till the colon, and the structure is: Subject+ verb+ object(the word)+adverb(only as connected with... till the colon) The advocacy of this thought is that the adverb is not complete without a part of it; "only as connected with" can not be split at this example, and the whole thing can answer the sole question asked to ...


5

The source of your confusion seems to be an overgeneralization of the word 'detailed'. You are correct that if something is complicated, it is most likely going to be difficult to understand. From The Free Dictionary: complicated, adj. Containing intricately combined or involved parts. Not easy to understand or analyze. See Synonyms at complex, elaborate....


5

The verb oversleep is normally intransitive (it doesn't take an object), but the full OED does have this for their second definition... oversleep To sleep beyond (a particular time); to miss (a train, etc.) by sleeping too long; to sleep through (something). Also figurative. So in principle you can say I overslept my plane. But I think that's a rather ...


5

When we use the verb win, for example, it often takes an Indirect Object and a Direct Object: It will win [you] [money]. Here, the Indirect Object, you, represents the person who is going to get the Direct Object, in this case the money. If we wish to put the Direct Object money directly after the verb, then we cannot use an Indirect Object, but we can ...


5

The phrase "do so" means, "do the thing previously mentioned". It's a way to avoid repeating the same words. In this case, the sentence could be reworded, "Did they 'fill in' for market failures, or did they often help to preserve existing inequalities, frequently giving rise to inefficiencies in the attempt to fill in for market failures?" But just ...


5

Look in this sentence is used as a Linking verb. they link the subject of the sentence to a word or phrase in the predicate that renames or describes the subject. If the verb is a form of be (be, being, been, am, is, are, was, were), you have a linking verb. For other verbs, if you can replace the verb with a form of "be" and the sentence makes sense, you ...


5

No, you don't need a conjunction or anything else between the two clauses. To so would unnecessarily separate the two objects of to ask. Let's look at two simpler sentences: John asked his friends something. John asked his friends how they rated the movie. The verb to ask can take two objects, traditionally called indirect (his friends) and ...


4

It's endorse. Assuming dell means a small wooded area, they are asking Diana, what dye pigments she thought was required to capture the colors of the leaves of the trees in the dell in her painting because the speaker believes they are much too red. [Thanks to everyone who pointed out the real meaning here]


4

Who finally receives? TOM, so it's object. Okay, What you give? A cup, so cup too is an object. So, the question is which is direct and which is indirect. I gave Tom a cup - TOM is the indirect object of the verb give Excerpt from the page having useful information An indirect object is the recipient of the direct object, or an otherwise affected ...


4

Law Area 51 Proposal - Co, I think your confusion stems from you not using the sentence as it is strictly constructed to figure out what are the direct and indirect objects. (On another note, this is why diagramming sentences shouldn't be a lost art.) Specifically the direct object is the primary target of the verb and the first necessary thing to happen. ...


4

Is it okay to omit the object? What object? If you use informing in an object verb sense, then an object must be supplied or it is nonstandard grammatically and has no sensical meaning in any ordinary context. It is almost certainly--or almost always--nonstandard or nonsensical to write or say He left me without informing. If we deem informing to be a ...


4

The answer is (2). Are you going to come there?" There is an adverb that means "in, at, or to that place or position". It already provides direction, which the preposition to expresses (hence 'to' should be omitted). Note: you may use 'to' if you replace 'there': i.e., "Are you going to come to the sports event?" or in spatial terms: "Are you going to ...


4

"Him driving" focuses on that person, "his driving" focuses on how that person drives. For example: "I don't agree with John driving to the shop" vs "I don't agree with John's slow driving to the shop". It should also be noted that "the mere knowing of his name" would be "merely knowing his name" in a more modern setting. BrE and AmE have moved on since ...


4

The game will lose money for you means that by playing the game, by way of the game you lose your money. Only by you playing the game do you lose money. No play, no loss. In other words, only you can lose your (own) money There are two basic ways to do this: by yourself you misplace the money yourself and can't find it you buy something ...


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