47

I found an answer in this article: 「私は日本人です」は、I am a Japanese. それとも"I am Japanese? In English there is a distinction between nationalities that end in 'ian' like Canadian or Italian and those that end in 'ese' like Japanese or Burmese. Those that have the 'ian' can say 'I am Canadian' or 'I am a Canadian' interchangeably, but usually in English ...


43

Yes, I think buttload is an acceptable, informal substitute, at least in AmE. However, some might still find the usage of butt somewhat offensive since some people consider butt to be a mild curse word. These people might include parents with very young children. Even so, I think most kids, teens, and adults wouldn't mind. In any case, a few more casual, ...


34

Technically, it's possible to use these terms for any gender. The definition in the dictionary will generally support that, as Max cited. However, there are strong cultural dimensions to these terms. It has been observed for a while that insults are divided by gender. In a 2011 article entitled "The Name Game: Using Insults to Illustrate the Social ...


32

Negro is currently considered somewhat offensive in the United States, and it's not advisable to use it if you are first learning the language. I say "somewhat" because there are circumstances where it is still used, but those circumstances are historically and socially complex, and even Americans still struggle with those circumstances. It's best to ...


30

I'm not sure there's a direct female equivalent, but there's a gender-neutral expression with a similar meaning and level of vulgarity: Get off my ass! That being said, I think it's much more common to hear a female speaker use the original "... breaking my balls," then for her to adapt it for female anatomy. I know plenty of women who use the expression ...


25

"Fuckin'" here is an intensifier, and it modifies "far". The meaning is the same as "very", with the added connotation of expressing contempt for social propriety, since "fuckin'" is vulgar. Since "far" is an adjective, "fuckin'" is an adverb, if it matters. (That's not a "word class", though, that's a part of speech: the role played by the word in a ...


21

I like Max's answer, but having lived in NZ for a while (as a non-native English speaker), the first thing that came to mind was heaps. Noun (informal) - a great deal; an enormous amount ⇒ I've got heaps to tell you., ⇒ You have heaps of time. Adverb (informal) - used as intensifier; very much; a great deal ⇒ He said he was feeling heaps better., ...


18

The polite version of shitload is 'shedload' or 'shedloads'. Whether 'buttload' is acceptable or not probably depends where you are - it wouldn't be acceptable in front of children in the UK, or in BrE. I can't say I find it that pleasant either, and I'm not a child...


16

There are a lot of other options that don't refer to specific body parts, but I gather that you want something similarly vulgar but referring to female anatomy. It's not all that common, but if you said something like: "Get off my tits!" the meaning would be readily understood. (Note: the expression "off my tits" or "off her tits" can mean other ...


14

The phrasal verb is shut up. Shut up: To ​stop ​talking or making a ​noise, or to make a ​person or ​animal ​stop making ​noise: I ​wish you’d shut up and ​listen. Shut up! I'm ​trying to ​think. Can you shut that ​dog up? In the sentence "Shut the fuck up down there!" The words the fuck are most likely "semantically inert". They only serve ...


13

Sure, it can come across as rude, especially when it's uttered bitterly, and it's meant to imply, "Do whatever you want - I don't care." However, in a more casual context, it's not necessarily rude. Sales Clerk: "...and that's the main difference between the red widgets, and the blue widgets." Customer: "Thanks for that information; I'd like to buy ...


12

The New Oxford American Dictionary has a note about using Negro. Since the Black Power movement of the 1960s, however, when the term black was favored as the term to express racial pride, Negro has dropped out of favor and now seems out of date or even offensive in both US and British English. The 2010 US Census questionnaire was criticized when it ...


11

I don't recommend you speak this way. I can't say it's "incorrect", but it's certainly a poor choice. Calling someone "a native" can be interpreted as conflating the place you were born with the language you spoke from birth. There are, for example, native speakers of Japanese who were born outside Japan, and thus are not "Japanese natives" by the usual ...


11

To address your question as posed in the title, there are some (nearly) masculine-specific insults: Bastard 1. Bastard is an insulting word which some people use about a person, especially a man, who has behaved very badly. ... 3. A bastard is a person whose parents were not married to each other at the time that he or she was born. This use ...


10

Oh so many, many ways. I'm sure you will get many suggestions. The world is going to the dogs. The world is going to hell in a handcart. The world is going downhill. The world is going to pieces. The world is going to pot. Just a few to get you started...


9

Many cuss words in English have less offensive counterparts, often with phonetic similarities. If you want your speech to sound less vulgar and coarse, use the terms on the left instead of the terms in parentheses: shoot (instead of shit) : Aw, shoot! I left my keys at home! darn (instead of damn) : Darn! My ball went in the creek again. gosh darn it ...


9

“Suit yourself” is almost never rude or downright impolite, but depending on tone may come across as snippy, judgemental, or negative. It can be uttered in a perfectly bland, casual manner, meaning “Do what you like” or “Do what you like, I don’t care”; or spoken with a bit more edge, may mean “That’s a stupid idea, but do what you like”. None of these ...


9

No, it is not Ok. Using a curse word is unprofessional and shows your writing skills are not creative. It shows you can't think of any other way to convey what you want to say, except by cursing. You can say something like, "So, What is Electrical Engineering, anyway?" Or " So, What's the Big Deal about Electrical Engineering?" Or even "Do We Really ...


9

The site that you found that on is UrbanDictionary. On that site, people write their own definitions. I think this may be somebody trying to be funny or something. "Sand nazis" isn't any sort of term, derogatory or not. Take a look at the upvotes/downvotes on that definition - 50 up, ~100 down. It's not a very good definition. I would recommend not ...


9

Humans have been producing social meaning from language nearly as long as we've been producing excremental material from nutrition. We might not need many mental steps to move from buttload to shitload and, from that juncture, produce a picture, feeling or perception that some would find vulgar, inappropriate for some situations, or with which we might ...


8

Note that what the hell (or the more common and even more offensive what the fuck) is a short form for something like... What the hell is going on? So just omit the "potentially offensive" bit in the middle. According to context, it might be you need to say "What are you doing?", or "What is that?", but hopefully the general principle is clear. Lots of ...


8

As everyone has more than one friend, or at least imagines so, it is natural to attach an additional modifier to my friend which informs the listener as to why mentioning this particular friend is relevant to the conversation. What modifier is useful and appropriate depends on the context of the conversation; this construction has the effect of reducing ...


8

Why should it be negative? It's just a statement of fact. People can be a foreigner in lands that they have not come from. Andrew Grimm, you mentioned that this question was in a Japanese context so maybe the idea of the word foreigner being negative is something from Japanese culture? I know how strict Japanese people can be in terms of manners and ...


8

The Original Poster seems to be inquiring about literal meaning of the sentences "fuck me" and "fuck you". The illocutionary force of these sentences is a different issue altogether. This post then is about the grammar of the Original Poster's examples, and how this affects what they literally mean. Fuck off Fuck you Fuck me My own example, ...


8

Not sure why it was removed in later revisions, but an older version of Wikipedia's list of Indefinite and fictitious numbers had some real gems: buckets couple-few "forty-leven" oodles scads umpteen lots of made-up words ending in "-illion", like gazillion and bazillion Probably the most direct replacement for "shitload/shitton" would be "metric load/...


8

The following represents usage in AmE. I imagine there are similarities in other English speaking regions. nigga Usage alert Nigga is used mainly among African Americans, but also among other minorities and ethnicities, in a neutral or familiar way and as a friendly term of address. It is also common in rap music. However, nigga is taken to be ...


8

Max has covered most of the answer well, so I will just offer an alternative interpretation of the final sentence. As this is essentially speech, not prose, you can't assume proper use of grammar. An alternative reading of the final sentence is therefore "Fuck this, nigga.", where "this" refers to the instructions from "D", not "D" the person, and "nigga" ...


8

Yes, we can call a female person a fucker or a motherfucker. These two words are not restricted to males. The two roughly mean a contemptible person, without regard to one's gender: fucker a person who fucks: a vulgar use an unpleasant or contemptible person: considered vulgar by many any person or thing: considered vulgar by many ...


7

The asterisks are usually due to the word itself being considered offensive, not the concept since you will see synonyms for the concept which are not asterisked out.


7

The second thing you need to know about the word "fuck" is that its use as an intensifier is strongly associated with certain classes, genders, and regions, and – moving from the topic of English grammar to the anthropology of English usage – has, just about everywhere, very strong and very complex norms (social rules) around just who can use it in the ...


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