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24 votes
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One should love everyone's wife. Is it right grammatically?

one should love everyone's wife Well ... it is grammatically correct. However it does not mean what you think it should mean. What this says is that you (or someone) should love everyone else's ...
Andrew's user avatar
  • 88.4k
23 votes

Grammarly says that starting "Like Pearl was hesitant to..." with "Like" is fine, but my parent says it is grammatically incorrect

Grammarly is right because the sentence is grammatically correct. Your teacher has a point because there are several issues with the usage of like in this sentence. According to the Cambridge ...
JavaLatte's user avatar
  • 60k
22 votes
Accepted

Why isn’t the pronoun “it” placed after But?

The two verb phrases sent soldiers... and is nonetheless... are conjoined by but and share the subject, Poland; parse it like this: sent soldiers ... Poland but is nonetheless ... ...
StoneyB on hiatus's user avatar
22 votes

Grammarly says that starting "Like Pearl was hesitant to..." with "Like" is fine, but my parent says it is grammatically incorrect

In the strictest sense, it is indeed grammatically correct. However, it’s not well written, and this is often misinterpreted as being equivalent to saying it’s grammatically incorrect. Consider for ...
Austin Hemmelgarn's user avatar
15 votes

One should love everyone's wife. Is it right grammatically?

You are right grammatically both sentences are correct but they differ in meaning. Suppose there are three persons in the context : a,b,c With the sentence One should love one's wife, you are ...
ab29007's user avatar
  • 326
11 votes

Should I include “as a” for every item in a list of jobs, or just the first item?

Both versions are syntactically fine, but idiomatically native speakers would tend to "delete" all "highly predictable" repetitions of as a in such contexts (or at the very least, delete repeated as). ...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
8 votes

Why isn’t the pronoun “it” placed after But?

It probably makes more sense to treat this as a kind of parallelling, rather than ellipsis. The two sentences are Poland sent soldiers to fight alongside Americans in Iraq Poland is nonetheless ...
JavaLatte's user avatar
  • 60k
6 votes

exception in the past tense clauses sequence rule?

I heard a little boy waving his hands above the water. This sentence is fine. "A little boy waving" doesn't violate the rule you stated because it's not a finite present tense verb phrase; it's a ...
eques's user avatar
  • 4,485
6 votes

Why isn’t the pronoun “it” placed after But?

Yes, it's a kind of ellipsis for style. It doesn't change the meaning. Other examples: She was top of her high school class, but (she) isn't planning to go to college. The computer can do ...
Andrew's user avatar
  • 88.4k
5 votes

One should love everyone's wife. Is it right grammatically?

(In light of the OP's recent edit) Grammatically speaking, the sentence: One should love everyone's wife is perfectly acceptable. It means it is a good idea if "you" (one) love the wives of ...
Mari-Lou A's user avatar
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5 votes
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Two-part question with "or"

The "or" part is correct, but the rest of the grammar is bad. ... do we have full control of our destiny or are uncontrollable factors involved in shaping... Each part of the question separated by ...
John Feltz's user avatar
  • 5,136
5 votes

Grammarly says that starting "Like Pearl was hesitant to..." with "Like" is fine, but my parent says it is grammatically incorrect

Your paragraph is grammatically correct. Your teacher was wise to ask you to re-write it. As written, the paragraph is difficult to understand. The first question is very long. I needed to read it ...
Jasper's user avatar
  • 24.3k
5 votes

Grammarly says that starting "Like Pearl was hesitant to..." with "Like" is fine, but my parent says it is grammatically incorrect

It's not quite correct. It's missing one word, at a minimum: "Like when Pearl..." or "Like the time when Pearl..." Alternatively, you could recast the sentence and make it slightly ...
Luke Sawczak's user avatar
4 votes

What's wrong with "university students would have to choose study over work, especially if they are undertaking a degree in theoretical subjects."?

If we don't substitute anything, we get the sentence from your title: Nonetheless, university students would have to choose study over work, especially if they are undertaking a degree in ...
ColleenV's user avatar
  • 12k
4 votes
Accepted

Is it possible to drop "do" to make the sentence parallel

If you remove do the meaning changes. Both versions are talking about two groups of people: Those who exercise daily Those who exercise 3-5 times a week. The original sentence has only one meaning: ...
nnnnnn's user avatar
  • 1,894
4 votes
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Ellipses following coordinating conjunction

Gapping Ellipsis is the elimination of repeated words from coordinate structures. The coordinating structures need not necessarily be of the same type: see Mismatch in syntactic category in this wiki ...
JavaLatte's user avatar
  • 60k
4 votes

on TV, radio, or in films?

1) The phrase "on TV, radio, and in films" sounds like a perfectly fine parallel structure to me. 2) As for the phrase "on radio", it sounds fine. However, there are some contexts where it might ...
J.R.'s user avatar
  • 110k
4 votes
Accepted

Parallel structure and comma

The GMAT wants the parallelism to reflect the manner in which the sentenced should be parsed. The way they would parse the sentence is: Joan of Arc, a young Frenchwoman who claimed to be divinely ...
PMV's user avatar
  • 957
4 votes
Accepted

Should I write "to" again in this sentence?

Her words seemed to make him happy and pacify his inner turmoil. Her words seemed to make him happy and to pacify his inner turmoil. Both are correct, and the meaning is much the same. The second ...
David Siegel's user avatar
  • 41.2k
4 votes

2 'The's with 2 consecutive nouns joined with a conjunction: "X and Y", "the X and Y", or "the X and the Y"?

I take this sentence as grammatical (but an extra "the" could definitely be added). This is because the writer is treating "transliteration and translation" as two things so closely related that they ...
katatahito's user avatar
  • 3,204
3 votes
Accepted

Two "not only" with one "but"; What should I do?

The second (emphasized) "not only" should be "only" to make it a logical sentence. It appears to be an editorial mistake. For completion of the sentence, I personally perfer "but also" over "but" (...
laugh salutes Monica C's user avatar
3 votes

What is the ellipsis of the sentence?

The use of the present participle with to isn't some strange infinitive thing; to is being used in the prepositional sense. The important thing here is that he had been trying to be helpful, so the ...
BobRodes's user avatar
  • 15.1k
3 votes

Which is correct - "policies of..." or policies in"?

Both are grammatically correct, because a country counts as a place and an "entity". For 1., since a country is a place, actions and rules apply in the country - therefore, the health policies in ...
sandm44n's user avatar
3 votes

Changing "It is strange that families adopt dogs but not a child." into passive voice

"It is strange that families adopt dogs but not a child." the OP's sentence. The passive: It is strange that dogs but not a child are adopted by families. Still "a child" vaguely referring to ...
SovereignSun's user avatar
  • 25.1k
3 votes

Parallelism test question: "By having a budget and (we stuck to it)"

In such situations, you are supposed to pick the answer with both the right structure and the right semantics. Actually, you did pick an answer with the right structure.  "Having a budget" and "...
Gary Botnovcan's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Parallelism in comparison

Yes, this sentence is ambiguous out of context. He is more interested in video games than his girlfriend. We don't know whether video games interest him more than his girlfriend does, or if she ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 128k
3 votes
Accepted

Going out is more interesting than GOING / TO GO with your family

I don’t think either one is “incorrect,” but I do think the second option reads better. The reason? It’s a parallel structure. Had the sentence begun like this: To go out with your friends is... ...
J.R.'s user avatar
  • 110k
3 votes
Accepted

Omission of subject and verb in parallel sentence

It is correct and appropriate. This comma is known as a "gapping comma", whereby the comma replaces words used earlier on. But you should use a semicolon instead of the full stop: On the top half ...
MotherBrain's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Is this sentence awkward?

Sorry but your re-write is awkward: The kids had scattered their books all over not only the bus but also the sidewalk. It is the placement of "not only" that breaks the sentence up in the wrong ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 105k

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