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121

There are a couple of things about this sentence which make it tricky, but I don't think it's outside the range of what would be considered normal for spoken English (remember it's a quote of what a character is saying). Firstly there is an omitted noun, secondly "try and" is used instead of "try to". I am not sure why people say "try and" instead of "try ...


44

Conformity is a virtue, creativity suspect, humor forbidden, and voice mute. This isn't a list describing "conformity", it is a list of things about legal writing. Conformity is a virtue. Creativity is suspect. Humor is forbidden. Voice is mute. I think the 4th part might not be clear. The word "voice" here is referring to the author's "voice" or their ...


20

Jesus. I can't answer all of them because I only have ten minutes. 4: The rat the cat the dog chased killed ate the malt. I'm going to slowly build the sentence. 1: The rat ate the malt. 2: The cat killed the rat. 3: The rat (that the cat killed) ate the malt.---------------- 4: The dog chased the cat. 5: The cat (that the dog chased) killed the rat.------...


18

First, I have read this book and 'bend down his head' is meant literally. Calcifer is a living fire who can be used as a stove, but only if he puts his head in the right position first. Second, the phrase "He won't bend down his head to be cooked on." When we cook using a fire or stove or similar, we say that we cook on it rather than with it. &...


18

To cook something on something: They cooked fish on a grill. To sit on something: He sat on a chair. To be sat on: The chair is designed to be sat on. To be cooked on: The grill is designed to be cooked on. Why are you scraping off loose paint with a dinner fork? A dinner fork is meant to be eaten with. I would like to be in the school play, but I ...


15

It's an example of ellipsis (specifically, gapping). The author has chosen to remove the repeated word "is" from Conformity is a virtue, creativity is suspect, humor is forbidden, and voice is mute. So, this isn't a description of conformity but, rather, a list of four separate points. "Voice", here, means one's personal style of writing, rather than ...


14

I am a British English speaker. I think the person who posted the online petition just accidentally made some grammar mistakes because they created a petition in a hurry, and the website offered no feature to correct the grammar later. The petition was posted very shortly before the final result of the voting was announced. Perhaps the poster thought that, ...


13

In fact it needs to read "based on" (or "based upon"; see comments). As you indicated that you expected, base on is a phrasal verb here. It is a multi-word item which has a meaning like using in X is calculated using Y. It cannot retain this meaning if the on element is omitted. It's obviously a typo. http://www.macmillandictionary.com/dictionary/british/...


13

My understanding is that picks should be changed to picked. As for the philosophical content explicitly picked over in the film’s dialogue, it’s something for the viewer to digest. Now it sounds normal.


12

In this phrase, 'that' is being used as a pronoun, standing in for the noun 'the vote'. So perhaps it could be read as: Indeed, in the first round he got a vote 80% of the vote of Emmanuel Macron's. In less terse, more readable wording, one might say: Indeed, in the first round, the votes he received totalled 80% of the votes received by Emmanuel ...


11

..and #5. Anyone who feels that if so many more students whom we haven't actually admitted are sitting in on the course than ones we have that the room had to be changed, then probably auditors will have to be excluded, is likely to agree that the curriculum needs revision. Breaking it down: Anyone who feels that if so many more ...


11

It's grammatically fine, but awkward because the first that is ambiguous. When I first encountered it I took it to be a subordinator (subordinating conjunction), but in fact it's a demonstrative pronoun, pointing to an event which preceded it in the article. The second that is a relativizer (relative pronoun), employed in a comparative construction the same ....


10

With context being somewhat limited, it seems he is saying that he had (knew/met) two people who tried and paid him "with great gold coins the size of hubcaps ten minutes ago". The HAVE + NOUN PHRASE (NP) + VERB construction means experience NP doing what the verb describes. For example: I have had many people come up to me and ask me for money. Another ...


10

There are two verbs in that sentence that have a subject. These are was and provided. Was is a little confusing because it's in a non-standard order. To be is a linking verb, so it can take an adjective as object - and in certain circumstances it can be OVS rather than SVO, which is what has happened here. The object is conspicuously missing, that is the ...


9

Your first example relies on a double meaning. On the first read through, the first sentence will most likely be interpreted as: One morning I shot an elephant [while I was wearing] my pajamas. That is, Groucho was wearing his pajamas while he shot the elephant. Upon reading the second sentence though, we realize Groucho had a much more absurd ...


8

Taking #3, the easiest one out of the lot... The complex houses married and single soldiers and their families. Breaking it down: The complex houses soldiers. (= the soldiers live / have housing in the complex) The complex houses married and single soldiers. (= both single and married soldiers live in the complex) The complex houses married and single ...


8

I'll pick the 6th: Buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo. It has three buffalo's - buffalo the animal, buffalo the city and buffalo the bullying. Now it makes it easy for us to understand. Paraphrasing: Buffalo buffalo (buffalo from the city Buffalo) [that] Buffalo buffalo buffalo (that the buffalo from the city Buffalo ...


8

How I, a dyslexic, parse #3 3: The complex houses married and single soldiers and their families. Oh! House is a noun! So the sentence must be talking about houses. Married is a verb, so the houses married something. Complex is an adjective. So far i know that weird looking houses married something. and single soldiers... hmm... oh the houses got married, ...


8

The word closed is an adjective, describing the state of your nose after pinching. The structure is called resultative: Wikipedia "resulative" "In linguistics, a resultative (abbreviated RES) is a form that expresses that something or someone has undergone a change in state as the result of the completion of an event. Resultatives appear as ...


7

Maintain is used here in the sense defined in Collins, 4: verb (transitive) [...] 4. (takes a clause as object) to state or assert ⇒ he maintained that Talbot was wrong Maintains parallels insists in the first clause: The ministry says that, but Strelkov says this.


7

Which refers to the initiative for nomination reforms and is the object of the preposition on. Embattled is not a past-tense finite verb but a past participle employed as an adjective modifying Chairman Moon. It means "confronted or surrounded by hostile forces". Pin X on Y means "rely on Y for [the success of] X*. Usually we pin our hopes on something; ...


7

The sentence is a question. It is difficult to read, even for a native speaker, so let's consider what it asks, one piece at a time: At the time of your entry to UA, will you have been... The question asks about a condition being true at the time you enter UA. The condition might be true now (at the time of your application) or you might expect it to ...


7

I don't quite understand why the singular form of 'try' is being used It isn't. In that sentence, "try" is a verb. With verbs, the singular version ends in an 's' and the plural version does not (mostly, as always, there are exceptions). So "try" is the plural version of the verb, while "tries" would be singular. "They try and he tries." Of course, ...


6

Ahem! Now taking the garden path sentence, the second one. The horse raced past the barn fell. It can be paraphrased as... The horse (that was) raced past the barn, fell! The trap here is due to the lexical category of the word raced which can be either a past-tense verb or a passive participle. Replace the horse and race and make the sentence. It'll ...


6

Is my understanding correct? Yes. I think preventing is a gerund here. Correct. Preventing employee crime couldn't be semantically in parallel with background checks and traditional audits. I'm not quite sure what you mean by in parallel. They are definitely not equivalent, but they are related. Background checks and traditional audits are ways to ...


6

I take this one: The horse raced past the barn fell. From merriam-webster.com: Definition of FELL dialect British : a high barren field or moor The horse raced past a barren piece of land that happens to have a barn on it. (Now go and correct your English teachers if they ever try to use this sentence as an example! Or in my case, Computer ...


6

I'm not familiar with the book, but clearly the fire-demon is a source of heat; and is not consenting to be used in this way by just anyone; presumably the mechanism of deriving heat involves him bending his head down (to a height suitable for cooking) and the frying pan goes on top... So the fire-demon is not the subject of the cooking, but the source. The ...


6

What you may be finding confusing regarding this sentence is the dropped 'that'. It is relatively common in English for words to be dropped if their presence can be inferred by the context. For clarity, I include it in italics with the noun phrase bolded (exactly as per snailboat's comment) It looks a lot like the China that May and I used to see in ...


6

This is a rhetorical form called zeugma, where common elements are dropped . As David pointed out, the repeated "is" is dropped for effect. Zeugma is not exclusive to English. In 66 BC, Cicero said "Vicit pudorem libido timorem audacia rationem amentia." ("Lust conquered shame; audacity, fear; madness, reason") — the word vicit ("conquered") is dropped ...


5

The main clause of the sentence is The sanctions come. Everything else in this sentence is a single long subordinate as clause expressing the occasion for the ‘coming’ of the sanctions—when and why they came. The subject of this subordinate clause is Travel bans and asset freezes aimed at President Vladimir Putin’s inner circle ... The last part ...


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