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20 votes
Accepted

"I am finished" vs "I have finished"

Depending on context they could have the same or slightly different meanings I have finished would be said after completing a task either very recently or some time in the recent past I am ...
Peter's user avatar
  • 66.2k
15 votes
Accepted

The ambiguous "he is buried"

There is no ambiguity. In a present-tense narrative, it could be passive "He marries, he dies, he is buried" but in any other context, it is adjectival. He is buried is a copular sentence, where ...
Colin Fine's user avatar
  • 75.9k
9 votes

"I am finished" vs "I have finished"

You could say either one, but things get more complicated when you elaborate and mention what you've finished: I have finished this task. I am finished with this task.
J.R.'s user avatar
  • 110k
6 votes

"I am finished" vs "I have finished"

Both are grammatically correct. I am finished The speaker is in the state of being finished with a task. I have finished This describes the completion of the task in the very recent past. (...
Mini Bhati's user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

Usage of "being"

I have simplified your sentence a little to explain how it works. Start of with this simple statement: Family time is pleasurable. If you want to use this as a reason for doing something, you can ...
JavaLatte's user avatar
  • 60k
3 votes

Comma before a participial phrase at the end of a sentence

It's a case of failing to identify the correct antecedent... We know the whale is rather unlikely to be in possession of binoculars, but it kind of sounds like it might be. Dropping a comma in there ...
DoneWithThis.'s user avatar
3 votes

The ambiguous "he is buried"

This "buried" is the so-called past participle.  The past participle is a non-finite verb form.  The other non-finite forms are the infinitive and the gerund.  "Non-finite" means ...
Gary Botnovcan's user avatar
3 votes

Usage of "being"

It's incorrect to use a clause (a unit of grammatical organization next below the sentence in rank and in traditional grammar said to consist of a subject and predicate) after "due to". In other words,...
Enguroo's user avatar
  • 5,492
3 votes
Accepted

"All the organizations involved have sent ...." sentence structure problem

You present the following example sentence from the Longmans dictionary definition of the verb appeal. All the organizations involved have sent urgent appeals to the government, asking for extra ...
P. E. Dant Reinstate Monica's user avatar
3 votes

closing or closed

Without context, I could not tell you the actual meaning of: the complicated question the complicating question It could be like: He could not answer a complicated question. which ...
user3169's user avatar
  • 31.2k
3 votes

two sentences about participles

It is not true that adjectival participle clauses in general cannot precede the noun they modify. Such pre-position is acceptable if any elements modifying the participle fall before it: okThe ...
StoneyB on hiatus's user avatar
3 votes

why does expensive goes before professional?

'Expensive' is an opinion. What is expensive to one person is not necessarily to another. It is related to perceived value. Adjectives of opinion always go first. A popular guide to order of ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 105k
2 votes

"oppose", active or passive voice?

(This is an old question ... but it was bumped, so ...) Both the question and the given answer from @cbh have misunderstood the actual quoted text that's the context of the question. As pointed out ...
Lifelong Learner's user avatar
2 votes

placement of the participle phrase

The phrase "nothing worth mentioning" is an idiom, and will normally be kept together. Did anything happen? / Nothing worth mentioning. In the sentence from mthe question this phrase can be broken ...
David Siegel's user avatar
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2 votes
Accepted

placement of the participle phrase

You can place the phrase after mentioning or after nothing, they are entirely equivalent. They parse differently, but the end effect is the same. It is a matter of style or personal preference. You ...
SamBC's user avatar
  • 22.8k
2 votes

Adjective form of "develop" as a transitive verb

Verbs don't have "adjective forms". They do have participles, and some adjectives are formed from the participle form of verbs. Often there are multiple interpretations about whether ...
James K's user avatar
  • 226k
2 votes

The departed (singular)

"departed" or "the dear departed" is correct in this context. Garner is criticising the "mawkish" style, not the grammar.
James K's user avatar
  • 226k
2 votes

Passive or adjective information

Yes, in this case the adjective and the passive form are the same. Moreover the meaning is also virtually the same. So it doesn't really matter. The only difference is that the passive sentence ...
James K's user avatar
  • 226k
2 votes
Accepted

Can i say "Tree is fallen" as "considering "fallen" as an adjective instead of past participle which will make the sentence passive voice?

There is no issue of "passive voice" here: fall is intransitive, so it has no passive. is fallen must therefore be an adjectival complement. This is possible, but unusual: fallen is fine as ...
Colin Fine's user avatar
  • 75.9k
2 votes
Accepted

Person age 65 or Person aged 65

Both are wrong. If it's a person --meaning just one-- then that person cannot be more than one age at the same time, so "65 and older" makes no sense. Best would be: A person aged 65 or ...
gotube's user avatar
  • 50.9k
2 votes

I AM WOKEN UP. Could i use "woken" here as an adjective/state instead of passive voice

It's 'grammatically correct', but it doesn't mean what you think. If you want to say that you are no longer asleep, say I am awake (or, as you suggest, I have woken up). I am woken up would mean '...
Kate Bunting's user avatar
  • 56.5k
1 vote
Accepted

Is this a participial phrase?

[1] I picked the one that was immersed in water. [2] I liked the one that was painted yellow. Stricly speaking, they are both ambiguous between adjectival and verbal passives. If they are ...
BillJ's user avatar
  • 17.1k
1 vote

Usage of participles

-ly turns an adjective (or a participle being used like an adjective) into an adverb. Adjectives modify nouns, adverbs modify verbs (or adjectives or other adverbs). The effect is that this turns a ...
LawrenceC's user avatar
  • 36.9k
1 vote

Clarity on the word blur, blurred and blurry

"Blurred" is the past tense of the verb to blur. It is also an adjective to describe something that is blurred, as in the case of your example. "Blurry" essentially means the same as "blurred", ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 105k
1 vote

Can I use "offset" as an adjective?

Set is a verb where its plain, past-tense, and past-participle forms are all the same. So when used in be + X constructions, it won't change. The configuration is set (past-participle). Offset is ...
LawrenceC's user avatar
  • 36.9k
1 vote

Can I use "offset" as an adjective?

But I recently discovered (while attempting to find a synonym) that I cannot really find this adjectival usage of the word "offset" attested in a dictionary or thesaurus. You say in your question ...
Jason Bassford's user avatar
1 vote

“Gathering evidence” vs. “Evidence-gathering”

The biggest difference is that on is a gerund (gathering evidence) and the other is a noun (evidence-gathering). If you were making a list and wanted the language to be parallel, one list of ...
Tyler V's user avatar
  • 536
1 vote

Absolute Phrases vs Participial phrases with and without commas

In five, neither Jake nor his friends are late; the friends leave, and do so without Jake being late. In six, Jake's friends are late; it is at this point a compound verb; Jake's friends leave while ...
Ryan Jensen's user avatar
1 vote

road, curving vs road curving : comma with participial phrases

curving over the swell of hillside that I saw as the flanks of some prehistorical animal, deep in slumber is a participle clause modifying road. Compare: On the plate was a scoop of ice-cream, ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 128k

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