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14 votes

and fixed himself a cup of coffee = fixing himself a cup of coffee?

The second version just sounds wrong to a native speaker. He wasn't fixing himself the coffee while waking. You might want something like it in context. Perhaps John got up at 7:30. Fixing himself a ...
Ethan Bolker's user avatar
  • 7,123
11 votes
Accepted

Having involved and Having been involved

"having involved in ..." here is definitely wrong. Involve is always transitive so needs an object. The " ...in trading etc." doesn't provide an object. you need to simply add &...
timchessish's user avatar
  • 1,891
10 votes
Accepted

Why ", removing ..." is better than ", which removes ..." in this case?

Grammarly replaced a relative clause (the clause starting with "which") with a participle. This is often possible. Both relative clauses and participles can be used as postmodifiers of nouns....
James K's user avatar
  • 223k
8 votes
Accepted

"no + gerund" or "not + gerund"

Consider the following: There was no scaling that steep cliff. Going around the mountain was the sane choice, not scaling that steep cliff. The first means that the cliff was impossible to ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 127k
6 votes

Understanding absolute construction

A participle clause is called "absolute" only when it has no syntactic relationship to its matrix clause†—when it plays no role in the syntax of the matrix clause but is just tacked on ...
StoneyB on hiatus's user avatar
6 votes
Accepted

and fixed himself a cup of coffee = fixing himself a cup of coffee?

I was taught that your second sentence, “*John got up at 7:30, fixing himself a cup of coffee,” is in error. This doesn’t work to describe a sequence of events. That construction would be correct if ...
Davislor's user avatar
  • 8,474
6 votes

What is the subject of the “sizzled”?

I think it should be in instead of into: At this, the man coughed and walked over to a can of water, throwing something into that sizzled for a split second. Or it could be missing it: At this, the ...
swmcdonnell's user avatar
  • 6,950
6 votes

How do we determine which person the participle clause is talking about?

'While', as a conjunction, links an action, event or condition to a marked time period. The action in your opening clause is the verb 'caught'. It was you carrying out that action, so many would ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 104k
5 votes

"no + gerund" or "not + gerund"

In modern English grammar, verb + ing is catogarized into three classes: Gerundial Noun Gerund-Participle Participle Adjective So whether no or not will come immediately before a verb + ing will ...
Man_From_India's user avatar
5 votes

participle with different subjects

Based on Longman English Grammar, page 32, you can use participle constructions after there and it. However, it occurs in formal style. It being a bank holiday all the shops were shut. (i.e. As it ...
Yuri's user avatar
  • 7,583
5 votes
Accepted

Being washed two weeks ago

It's not wrong to use "being", but as WendyG says, most native speakers would probably choose "having been". It makes more sense to describe washing as a relative action, especially (as stangdon ...
Andrew's user avatar
  • 88.3k
5 votes

Which of the two words sounds more natural and common to native speakers? “Though merging/merged...”

Merged and merging mean something different. In your sentence they are used as participles- one present participle the other Perfect participle. Merging would mean in your sentence that they are ...
user1535037's user avatar
5 votes

and fixed himself a cup of coffee = fixing himself a cup of coffee?

The first sentence is a compound sentence with two primary verbs. The second sentence is the subject, "John", modified by the present participle "fixing." sentence #1 (sentences ...
reqkuma's user avatar
  • 122
5 votes
Accepted

What does this past participle attribute refer to?

The phrase in italics modifies "personal judgments" (not including "catalogs of"). The rule for determining what a relative clause should modify is the closest noun that fits the ...
gotube's user avatar
  • 50.9k
5 votes

Having involved and Having been involved

Having involved all those people in the scandal, he was now looking to exonerate himself. [transitive] Having been involved in the scandal himself, he was now looking for redemption. To involve ...
Lambie's user avatar
  • 45.7k
5 votes

Why ", removing ..." is better than ", which removes ..." in this case?

This is a construction using a participle clause. Participle clauses enable us to say information in a more economical way. They are formed using present participles (going, reading, seeing, walking, ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
4 votes

What is the grammatical function of "knowing" in the sentence "he's grown up knowing your name."?

This is not a 'reduced' form. Knowing here acts here in its participial capacity, not gerundial, so the phrase/clause knowing your name acts as an adjectival. Syntactically it is a 'secondary ...
StoneyB on hiatus's user avatar
4 votes

usage of 'having been + past participle'

Is it okay to use 'Having been+third form' as the reduction of Passive Relative Clause in Simple Past Tense in order to put more emphasis? In a word, no—because BE having been VERBPaPpl is not ...
StoneyB on hiatus's user avatar
4 votes

"He / his being..." In this context

John being a good teacher, his son never failed. This is a grammatically correct sentence. John being a good teacher is a Gerund_Participial clause (non-finite clause) with John is the explicit ...
Man_From_India's user avatar
4 votes

Can someone help analyze the structure of the second clause?

Participial clauses do not always share subjects with other clauses. (If anyone told you that they do, then that person was very mistaken.) In this case, it makes no sense for "wind" to be &...
MarcInManhattan's user avatar
4 votes

Participle or gerund clause

There is little likelihood of [Boris winning the prize]. "Winning" is a verb. "Boris winning the prize" is a subordinate non-finite clause functioning as complement of the ...
BillJ's user avatar
  • 17.1k
3 votes

What does it mean when the sentence take the form of '~ , meaning ~'?

I don't agree with user178049 that the participial clauses mentioned in the OP postmodify the noun phrase head. This will be usually the case when there is no comma between the noun and the "ing"- ...
Gustavson's user avatar
  • 4,136
3 votes

participle clause vs participle phrase

A clause is a part of sentence that contains a finite verb; a phrase is a part of sentence that does NOT contain a finite verb, but many sources just do not pay attention to this difference in the ...
Claire Wilson's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Present simple with "that" vs. a participle

The that can be omitted from a relative clause except when the relativised noun phrase functions as the subject of the relative clause: He was the person I saw/that I saw but He was the person that ...
Colin Fine's user avatar
  • 75.8k
3 votes
Accepted

participial construction: the driver dying instantly

It's correct. I might say, "The car crashed into the building, with the driver dying instantly." And instead of "dying instantly," you could say "being killed instantly."...
zunojeef's user avatar
  • 769
3 votes

Isn't it supposed to be 'it' instead of 'its'?

We can use the possessive before a gerund. Marjorie’s showing up late for meetings was nothing new This, in Keller's view, amounts to "a clear presumptive case against patriotism's being a ...
Michael Harvey's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Isn't it supposed to be 'it' instead of 'its'?

Here is the traditional position: A noun phrase is required after the preposition of. Thus, having fallen should be considered a gerund rather than a participial phrase. Thus, it should be introduced ...
Jeffrey Carney's user avatar
3 votes

How do we determine which person the participle clause is talking about?

There's no magic method that you can use. You infer the subject from context. There are some rules of thumb: the closest noun is more likely to be the understood subject, but it is easy to create ...
James K's user avatar
  • 223k
3 votes

How do we determine which person the participle clause is talking about?

Yes, it can be ambiguous who a pronoun refers to. Not just when using the word "while" but in many cases. Sometimes it's obvious from the context. "While the doctor was operating on the ...
Jay's user avatar
  • 66.8k
2 votes

participle with different subjects

These are called Absolute phrases, which are noun phrases (usually a noun plus a participle phrase ) working as adverbs modifyingthe the verbs of tha main clauses like any other adverbs.
HAYDER's user avatar
  • 21

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