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11 votes
Accepted

Having involved and Having been involved

"having involved in ..." here is definitely wrong. Involve is always transitive so needs an object. The " ...in trading etc." doesn't provide an object. you need to simply add &...
timchessish's user avatar
  • 2,014
10 votes
Accepted

Why ", removing ..." is better than ", which removes ..." in this case?

Grammarly replaced a relative clause (the clause starting with "which") with a participle. This is often possible. Both relative clauses and participles can be used as postmodifiers of nouns....
James K's user avatar
  • 226k
6 votes

How do we determine which person the participle clause is talking about?

'While', as a conjunction, links an action, event or condition to a marked time period. The action in your opening clause is the verb 'caught'. It was you carrying out that action, so many would ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 105k
6 votes

What is the subject of the “sizzled”?

I think it should be in instead of into: At this, the man coughed and walked over to a can of water, throwing something into that sizzled for a split second. Or it could be missing it: At this, the ...
swmcdonnell's user avatar
  • 7,562
5 votes
Accepted

What does this past participle attribute refer to?

The phrase in italics modifies "personal judgments" (not including "catalogs of"). The rule for determining what a relative clause should modify is the closest noun that fits the ...
gotube's user avatar
  • 50.9k
5 votes

Why ", removing ..." is better than ", which removes ..." in this case?

This is a construction using a participle clause. Participle clauses enable us to say information in a more economical way. They are formed using present participles (going, reading, seeing, walking, ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
5 votes

Having involved and Having been involved

Having involved all those people in the scandal, he was now looking to exonerate himself. [transitive] Having been involved in the scandal himself, he was now looking for redemption. To involve ...
Lambie's user avatar
  • 46.5k
4 votes

Participle or gerund clause

There is little likelihood of [Boris winning the prize]. "Winning" is a verb. "Boris winning the prize" is a subordinate non-finite clause functioning as complement of the ...
BillJ's user avatar
  • 17.1k
3 votes

How do we determine which person the participle clause is talking about?

Yes, it can be ambiguous who a pronoun refers to. Not just when using the word "while" but in many cases. Sometimes it's obvious from the context. "While the doctor was operating on the ...
Jay's user avatar
  • 67.3k
3 votes

How do we determine which person the participle clause is talking about?

There's no magic method that you can use. You infer the subject from context. There are some rules of thumb: the closest noun is more likely to be the understood subject, but it is easy to create ...
James K's user avatar
  • 226k
2 votes

What does this past participle attribute refer to?

The phrase made by each individual user of quantum mechanics modifies the term judgments. In the active voice, judgments would be the direct object of the verb "make." A way to rewrite your ...
Quack E. Duck's user avatar
2 votes

Participle clauses with different subjects

Neither of your sentences is correct English. You could say While Tom was doing his homework, Jane cleaned her room. If Tom was mentioned in the previous sentence, so we know who you are talking about,...
Kate Bunting's user avatar
  • 56.5k
2 votes

'Having been released in ...' or 'Released in ...'? Is the Perfect Participle Necessary?

The Perfect aspect (particularly as Having been X'ed, and even more particularly when "fronted") normally implies a causal relationship, not just a temporal one. One thing followed the other ...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
2 votes

'Having been released in ...' or 'Released in ...'? Is the Perfect Participle Necessary?

You don't need the "having been" in the Avatar movie sample sentence. Other examples: Painted in purple and blue, the room now looked very merry. Decried by some and praised by others, the ...
Lambie's user avatar
  • 46.5k
2 votes

He felt sick and threw up a lot because drinking too much one day before. - correct use of a participle phrase?

Both are incorrect. Better would be because he had drunk or even because of drinking. And either of these can be reversed to put the cause after the effect. Which ordering might be preferred depends ...
Paul Tanenbaum's user avatar
1 vote
Accepted

Commas before participle clauses

In many cases we use a comma where it would be natural to make a slight pause in speech. In your last two examples, it would be wrong to include a comma. Cleaning cars is what the job consists of, not ...
Kate Bunting's user avatar
  • 56.5k
1 vote

What is the subject of the “sizzled”?

As already noted, the word "into" is a mistake. You should therefore be cautious about using this book for learning English. The fix is to use "in" to form a verb phrase "...
James K's user avatar
  • 226k
1 vote
Accepted

'Having been released in ...' or 'Released in ...'? Is the Perfect Participle Necessary?

Note: Having researched this topic in detail, I am posting an answer that I feel best addresses my question. In short, the perfect participle is not always required to indicate that the content of the ...
MJ Ada's user avatar
  • 277
1 vote

He felt sick and threw up a lot because drinking too much one day before. - correct use of a participle phrase?

You can also say He threw up from drinking too much the night before. He was exhausted from traveling for two days without sleep. The children were dizzy from riding the spinning teacups at the ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 128k
1 vote

He felt sick and threw up a lot because drinking too much one day before. - correct use of a participle phrase?

In this particular case 'example 2' makes much more sense. Stating the cause first and then the consequence makes it sound like vomiting is a foregone conclusion if you drink too much; whereas stating ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 105k
1 vote

participle clause vs participle phrase

A phrase is a grammatical structure. Phases are headed by a word. For example Noun Phrases are headed by a noun. A clause is a grammatical structure headed by a verb. This is significant because ...
James K's user avatar
  • 226k

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