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5 votes
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Being washed two weeks ago

It's not wrong to use "being", but as WendyG says, most native speakers would probably choose "having been". It makes more sense to describe washing as a relative action, especially (as stangdon ...
Andrew's user avatar
  • 88.4k
5 votes
Accepted

are the phrases that begin with "unable" considered participle phrases?

She fluffed the pillow and changed position, [unable to sleep]. We both looked at her intently, [unable to respond]. No: "unable" is an adjective functioning as head of the adjective ...
BillJ's user avatar
  • 17.1k
4 votes
Accepted

During the tour, you will hear interesting stories about the city, learning (?) about its establishment

We can use the participle clause as you do there to express an incidental or tangential fact. We will visit the ruins on our tour, fording the stream to reach the dig site. The problem with your ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 128k
3 votes

two sentences about participles

It is not true that adjectival participle clauses in general cannot precede the noun they modify. Such pre-position is acceptable if any elements modifying the participle fall before it: okThe ...
StoneyB on hiatus's user avatar
3 votes

He ducked behind a tree before being spotted

In a comment above I stated: No, we can't know from the sentence as written whether he's been spotted. The "before being spotted" phrase can go either way. Let's unpack this. The sense of the OP's ...
Robusto's user avatar
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3 votes
Accepted

"All the organizations involved have sent ...." sentence structure problem

You present the following example sentence from the Longmans dictionary definition of the verb appeal. All the organizations involved have sent urgent appeals to the government, asking for extra ...
P. E. Dant Reinstate Monica's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

What does this -ing phrase refer to: "IL17A is produced by Th17 cells, constituting a subtype of T-helper cells"

Consider these sentences: 1a Walking through the meadow, I noticed several orchids. 1b I noticed several orchids, walking through the meadow. 2a Sweeping through the sky, I watched the ...
JavaLatte's user avatar
  • 60k
3 votes
Accepted

relative clause or participle phrase

People will buy the classics based on her recommendation but sales won't reach the kind of numbers (which is) achieved in the first book club. It is perfectly reasonable to say that "which is" is ...
Mohd Zulkanien Sarbini's user avatar
3 votes

You slept with your mouth open VS with your mouth opened (could be difference?)

"Open" is the classic example of an "ergative" verb. It can be used with an object The dentist opens John's mouth. Or intransitively John's mouth opens. Notice the object of ...
James K's user avatar
  • 226k
3 votes
Accepted

"Steering clear" vs "Steered clear" in this participle phrase

Steered clear, the orca will be like, "I'm going straight to it cuz I love Chinook salmon." Being steering clear is ungrammatical. Steering clear is grammatical but unlikely in this ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
3 votes

Are Participles adjectives or are they both adjectives and adverbs?

Participles are verbs. Some adjectives have been formed from participles and retain the "-ing" or "-ed" ending. Just because a word or phrase modifies a noun does not make it an ...
James K's user avatar
  • 226k
2 votes

During the tour, you will hear interesting stories about the city, learning (?) about its establishment

To use learn, it would need to be: During the tour, you will hear interesting stories about the city and learn about its establishment and history. The verb forms of "hear" and "learn" are the ...
user3169's user avatar
  • 31.2k
2 votes

Do "Though it hurts, ..." and "Hurting, ..." bear the same meaning?

Because "listened" is in the past tense, I'd say that the first sentence would be better as follows: Though it hurt, Linda still listened to Jeff. or Though it hurt her, Linda still listened ...
Mitch Lillie's user avatar
2 votes

Being washed two weeks ago

In that particular sentence, where the main clause has "the car still looks clean", Being washed is ungrammatical. You can more readily hear that is ungrammatical when you reverse the order of the ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 128k
2 votes

He ducked behind a tree before being spotted

I'll start here: He ducked behind a tree before he could be spotted. To me, this version clearly indicates that he was not spotted. I disagree with user1369's comment that "could" adds nothing, ...
cjl750's user avatar
  • 3,003
2 votes
Accepted

Complementing an indirect object

"wielded by a swordsman" is a participle phrase acting as an adjective on sword. The branch was cut with a sword. The sword was wielded by a swordsman. Thus: The branch was cut with a sword ...
SamBC's user avatar
  • 22.8k
2 votes

Complementing an indirect object

The branch was cut with [a sword wielded by a swordsman]. It's perfectly grammatical, but a tad odd semantically (see Andrew's answer). But "sword" is not an indirect object (there is no indirect ...
BillJ's user avatar
  • 17.1k
2 votes
Accepted

"combined with the fact that" and "this means"

I would not omit this means from your sentence. This is referring to the two previous sentences. The combined with... clause is not modifying the entire sentence -- it is actually just modifying this....
Justin's user avatar
  • 2,256
2 votes

The word "Combined" at the beginning of the sentence

It means "together", or "considered as a whole". It means that the papers are all contributing to the yielding of data, or the illustration of the breadth of biomechanics research, ...
Chris Mack's user avatar
  • 5,848
2 votes

"I use my phone to keep in touch with my friends asking them about homework."

This line was spoken, so you of course couldn't hear punctuation. Written out, the best punctuated sentence without ambiguity is I use my phone to keep in touch with my friends, asking them about ...
Eddie Kal's user avatar
  • 18.9k
2 votes
Accepted

Is "One of them being tourist attractions" a complete sentence?

No, that is not generally considered a complete sentence. It does have a verb ("being"), but that is not enough. A complete sentence should have a subject and a predicate, and the predicate ...
MarcInManhattan's user avatar
2 votes

Do these sentences mean the same: "I sat watching the rain" vs "I sat while I was watching the rain."

Your interpretation of the two sentences and their difference is correct. Although (2) could be taken as meaning the same as (1) depending on the wider context. As Kate Bunting says, the second one is ...
Peter Jennings's user avatar
2 votes

He felt sick and threw up a lot because drinking too much one day before. - correct use of a participle phrase?

Both are incorrect. Better would be because he had drunk or even because of drinking. And either of these can be reversed to put the cause after the effect. Which ordering might be preferred depends ...
Paul Tanenbaum's user avatar
2 votes

'Having been released in ...' or 'Released in ...'? Is the Perfect Participle Necessary?

You don't need the "having been" in the Avatar movie sample sentence. Other examples: Painted in purple and blue, the room now looked very merry. Decried by some and praised by others, the ...
Lambie's user avatar
  • 46.4k
2 votes

'Having been released in ...' or 'Released in ...'? Is the Perfect Participle Necessary?

The Perfect aspect (particularly as Having been X'ed, and even more particularly when "fronted") normally implies a causal relationship, not just a temporal one. One thing followed the other ...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
1 vote

My question is about the words "when" & "while" in the sentences

All of the sentences are fine. Although just taking a shower, I heard . . . is quite unusual and would not normally be used. Verbs that convey an ongoing action are most often preceded by something ...
Jason Bassford's user avatar
1 vote

Which noun does "be nontoxic" describe in this sentence?

The part "processed from these materials" is a participle phrase modifying the noun biomaterials. It functions like an adverb, and is thus adverbial, telling you what kind of biomaterials the ...
Eddie Kal's user avatar
  • 18.9k
1 vote

"each light deserting her" or "each light was deserting her"?

Each light was deserting her is a complete sentence: it has a subject (each light) and a verb (was deserting). Then the glow faded is also a complete sentence, because it has a subject (the glow) and ...
stangdon's user avatar
  • 40.9k
1 vote

Is this a correct usage of participial phrase?

'Being used' sounds slightly odd in this context, as does 'used by thousands of people on a daily basis'. This sounds like something you would say in a resumé. If so, I would keep it simple and just ...
James's user avatar
  • 6,554
1 vote

Do you ever use "being" instead of because

The short answer is that your two examples do mean the same thing, so if it helps you to think of it that way, in this example, you can. But it might be dangerous to do so, because you will run into ...
joiedevivre's user avatar
  • 4,660

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