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26 votes

"Stopped talking" and "stopped to talk"

Infinitives of purpose We can use an infinitive of purpose at the end of a clause to explain WHY we do something or did something: I came to London to learn English. I went to the shops to buy some ...
Araucaria - Not here any more.'s user avatar
20 votes
Accepted

"A myth come true." Is the base form of "come" legitimate?

"A myth come true" is a noun phrase, not a complete sentence. You are correct in that if it were a complete sentence, the verb would have to be correctly conjugated for the subject. In this ...
stangdon's user avatar
  • 40.9k
16 votes

Why was 'Having seen that it is about to rain...' not the correct answer?

had better I suspect that you were caught out by the word “had”. After all, “had” is the past tense of “to have” (“I had a dog”), and it’s also used as a helper to signify the past perfect (“I had ...
KrisW's user avatar
  • 808
11 votes

have got phrase for Americans

This question and AlanCarmack's answer has gotten me to think about when I use "have/had got" and "have/had gotten." I grew up in the USA Midwest, plus 20 years in a heterogenous southern California ...
mkennedy's user avatar
  • 1,289
11 votes
Accepted

Having involved and Having been involved

"having involved in ..." here is definitely wrong. Involve is always transitive so needs an object. The " ...in trading etc." doesn't provide an object. you need to simply add &...
timchessish's user avatar
  • 1,887
9 votes

Complex object with "see" usage

"I saw her cross the street" describes the event as a complete action from start to finish, while "I saw her crossing the street" describes the action as something that was in progress when you ...
Darryl's user avatar
  • 772
8 votes

Why is there no "be" in the continuous clause?

Stark's bodyguard spearheading the thing This is not a sentence, because it doesn't contain a verb. It's a fragment and a noun phrase. It doesn't stand alone here: it's presented as a sort of ...
TypeIA's user avatar
  • 12.3k
7 votes

"Stopped talking" and "stopped to talk"

Stopped talking Ali was talking, but then stopped talking and did something else. Stopped to talk Ali was doing something (like walking), but then he stopped that something and started talking. ...
Stephen S's user avatar
  • 1,485
7 votes

Does "People should be concerned about…" contain the passive voice?

I would tend to agree. Past participles in English can be promoted to adjectives. And this can result in sentences that can be parsed in several different ways. To distinguish you can ask "could ...
James K's user avatar
  • 223k
6 votes

drunk and drunken

We have the adjective drunk which means "inebriated, physically and mentally showing the effects of having consumed too much alcohol". It is used as a predicate complement: That man is very drunk. ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 126k
6 votes

A question related to participles

✘ We starting early, arrived at noon. No, you can't say that unless you turn starting early into nonessential information by putting it between parenthetical commas. Otherwise, if it's essential ...
Jason Bassford's user avatar
6 votes
Accepted

Why is there no "be" in the continuous clause?

The "ing" form has other uses: participles and gerunds. This is a participle phrase, headed by the participle "spearheading" and functioning to modify the noun "bodyguard&...
James K's user avatar
  • 223k
6 votes

A reading man/a man reading

When you put a verb before the noun it acts as an adjective. In example 1, you are describing the man as "a reading man". In example 2, you saw a man and 'reading' is the action he is ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 103k
6 votes

Possessive pronouns before gerunds

[1] I do not like [his working late]. [2] I do not like [him working late]. As with most sentences, there may be some emphasis, but it is not a distinguishing feature of either one. Both clauses mean ...
BillJ's user avatar
  • 17.1k
5 votes
Accepted

have got phrase for Americans

Have got can mean, simply, have (as in possess). This is especially true for British English (BrE). Note that with this meaning, have got is usually contracted to 've got. Have got is also the BrE ...
Alan Carmack's user avatar
5 votes

Is "can be got/gotten?" correct?

These two Ngrams might help: can be gotten and can be got. The former has been steadily decreasing in usage since 1917 (with a slight rise and peak in 1945 and 1975), but the latter has dropped from ...
Teacher KSHuang's user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

Thanks to the newly (purchasing/ purchased) printer,

"purchased" is correct. It refers to an action that has been completed - The printer has been/was purchased. The continuous tense can't be used in this context - "a purchasing printer" is the one ...
SovereignSun's user avatar
  • 25.1k
5 votes
Accepted

Dangling participle?

I'm afraid your prior assumption is incorrect. These are not "dangling participles". These are just ordinary participles. Many participles, like those in (1-4), are formed from reducing relative ...
John Lawler's user avatar
  • 2,840
5 votes

Having involved and Having been involved

Having involved all those people in the scandal, he was now looking to exonerate himself. [transitive] Having been involved in the scandal himself, he was now looking for redemption. To involve ...
Lambie's user avatar
  • 45.5k
4 votes
Accepted

Comma with Participle Clause

If the participle clause relates to the last item in the main clause, no comma is required. In the following sentence, for example, the participle clause applies to "dog". He watched the dog ...
JavaLatte's user avatar
  • 59.9k
4 votes

The user is logged in vs The user is logged-in

As stangdon says, the hyphenated form is an adjective usually placed before the noun: Logged-in users have privileges based on their assigned role. Otherwise, as in your first sentence, don't ...
Andrew's user avatar
  • 88.3k
4 votes

'Being' a gerund 'being' a participle

*[1] I being angry is not a good thing. [2] My being angry is not a good thing. [3] Me being angry is not a good thing. No: "being" is a 'gerund-participle' verb in all three examples, but ...
BillJ's user avatar
  • 17.1k
4 votes
Accepted

What does the participle phrase describe in this sentence?

It will be understood to apply to the window was slightly open, since it's just after that phrase and the furniture having been moved won't let in a draft. Just by the way, I would use the furniture ...
Jack O'Flaherty's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

Resist < inclusion vs being included>

There is nothing inappropriate about sometimes using a noun instead of a verb. After much discussion, we decided to... (sounds better than 'discussing it for a long time'). He was arrested for the ...
Kate Bunting's user avatar
  • 55.5k
4 votes

Why was 'Having seen that it is about to rain...' not the correct answer?

This is an idiomatic use of "see", and doesn't really mean "behold" or "look at with your eyes". It means more "be aware" or "know". Seeing as it's ...
James K's user avatar
  • 223k
3 votes

Is this -ing form a gerund or a participle?

In this case "enlightening" is a simple adjective derived from "enlighten", i.e. "something that enlightens". So it's a participle that modifies "education". A gerund is a noun derived from a verb, ...
Andrew's user avatar
  • 88.3k
3 votes

two sentences about participles

It is not true that adjectival participle clauses in general cannot precede the noun they modify. Such pre-position is acceptable if any elements modifying the participle fall before it: okThe ...
StoneyB on hiatus's user avatar
3 votes

Is it OK to use the participle like this: "Today I driven a car"?

Today I drove a car. Drove is the simple past of the verb to drive. You can see how to conjugate "drive" here. Today I will drive a car. Today I will be driving a car. Today I drove a car. ...
Ste's user avatar
  • 377

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