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20 votes
Accepted

"A myth come true." Is the base form of "come" legitimate?

"A myth come true" is a noun phrase, not a complete sentence. You are correct in that if it were a complete sentence, the verb would have to be correctly conjugated for the subject. In this ...
stangdon's user avatar
  • 40.9k
16 votes

Why was 'Having seen that it is about to rain...' not the correct answer?

had better I suspect that you were caught out by the word “had”. After all, “had” is the past tense of “to have” (“I had a dog”), and it’s also used as a helper to signify the past perfect (“I had ...
KrisW's user avatar
  • 969
11 votes
Accepted

Having involved and Having been involved

"having involved in ..." here is definitely wrong. Involve is always transitive so needs an object. The " ...in trading etc." doesn't provide an object. you need to simply add &...
timchessish's user avatar
  • 2,014
6 votes

Possessive pronouns before gerunds

[1] I do not like [his working late]. [2] I do not like [him working late]. As with most sentences, there may be some emphasis, but it is not a distinguishing feature of either one. Both clauses mean ...
BillJ's user avatar
  • 17.1k
5 votes

Having involved and Having been involved

Having involved all those people in the scandal, he was now looking to exonerate himself. [transitive] Having been involved in the scandal himself, he was now looking for redemption. To involve ...
Lambie's user avatar
  • 46.4k
4 votes

Why was 'Having seen that it is about to rain...' not the correct answer?

This is an idiomatic use of "see", and doesn't really mean "behold" or "look at with your eyes". It means more "be aware" or "know". Seeing as it's ...
James K's user avatar
  • 226k
3 votes
Accepted

Temporal interpretation of -ing clause

With no other information, most people would infer that the "eating" occurred at the same time as the "preparing". If you wanted to suggest that the eating preceded the preparing (...
MarcInManhattan's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Difference between Perfect and Present relative time reference with the past participle form

Okay, let’s analyze both of these sentences. They filmed the thief. This is a simple declarative sentence, with the usual word order: subject (They), main verb (filmed), and direct object (the thief)...
Davislor's user avatar
  • 8,491
2 votes

wearing a beautiful wedding gown

None of these sound natural in English, mainly for the reason Yosef Baskin explained: All are ambiguous about who is wearing the wedding gown or seem to connect the kiss to the wedding gown in a way ...
mamster's user avatar
  • 1,251
2 votes

He had problems reading without glasses. In the above sentence is 'reading' a present participle or a gerund in this sentence

In "He had problems reading without glasses." reading is a gerund-participle. In traditional grammar, it was a gerund.
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

"..., with aftershocks continued..."

The choice of verb form is wrong. Since, from general knowledge of earthquakes, we know that "aftershocks" is the subject of "continue" you should choose an active form of the verb....
James K's user avatar
  • 226k
1 vote

making otoscopic examination?

If you goal is to rewrite this sentence: Some children have narrow external ear canals, making otoscopic examination difficult and perhaps predisposing them to stenosis. as independent clauses ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 128k
1 vote

Why was 'Having seen that it is about to rain...' not the correct answer?

If you put some times on exactly when both actions happened, I think it will become clearer. Five years ago, having seen it is about to rain, we had better leave now. The five years ago matches up ...
jmoreno's user avatar
  • 1,230
1 vote

Possessive pronouns before gerunds

I do not like his working late. I do not like him working late. (2) is used when the emphasis is on him. In this case, working is adjectival and was previously called a present participle. Yes, ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
1 vote

What are the difference between these two sentences?

The subject in the two sentences is, indeed, different. The subject of the first sentence is the victim. The use of the participle form of a verb as an adjective to modify nouns is described on ...
Glaadrial's user avatar
  • 383
1 vote
Accepted

Rules for Joining by Past Participle

I modified the example: I saw a chicken. It was burnt. The 2 sentences can be combined: I saw a chicken which was burnt. We can reduce the above relative clause: ... we can in cases reduce ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar

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