37

Without context (or the pronunciation pattern), it's hard to tell. The sentence is ambiguous - it can very well be both. "You made me like this." with "like" as a verb would mean "You forced me/caused me to enjoy this". For example: - I thought you didn't like eggplant? - You made me like this! Your cooking is amazing! "You made me like this." with "...


22

The ODO says Vietnamese ADJECTIVE Relating to Vietnam, its people, or their language. ‘He liked Asian people, Vietnamese people in particular, and their culture, considerably more than he liked Australian culture.’ ‘We were representing a Saturday morning Vietnamese language school.’ NOUN 1 A native or inhabitant of Vietnam, or a person ...


15

There is no ambiguity. In a present-tense narrative, it could be passive "He marries, he dies, he is buried" but in any other context, it is adjectival. He is buried is a copular sentence, where "buried", an adjective, is the complement of the copula "is". You can call it a participial adjective if you like, as it originates as a participle: I'm not ...


14

You can also understand that sentence like this: They dug the well (to be | so it was) deep. in which case deep is a characteristic of the well, not a manner of digging. Compare: They ate the fish raw. P.S. Consider the following. The parentheses around to be indicates that those words could be used in an actual statement but may be omitted without ...


13

Scotland Police Dogs Training Centre is what is known as a Noun Compound. English is full of noun compounds, which are formed by putting nouns together, in what seems like any order at all, to form multi-word phrases that behave like single nouns. Noun Compound is a mnemonic name, because it is itself a noun compound; it's composed of two nouns and means '...


13

Traditionally, it's referred to as a "subordinating conjunction" because it introduces a subordinate clause. But in modern grammar, it's analyzed as a preposition that takes a clause rather than a noun phrase as a complement.


12

A guard of honour, according to yourdictionary, is: A group of people (especially military), arranged in one or more rows, at a ceremony to honour, or a visit by, an important person. It is not uncommon to treat nouns that represent groups of individuals as plural nouns, even when the noun itself is strictly singular, especially when referring to an ...


11

You said you weren't asking for a list, but I think making a list is the easiest way to answer this question. Filtering part-of-speech.txt, I found the following entries which matched A, [Vti], N, and v simultaneously: Ojibway Adjective, Adverb, Verb (transitive), Noun ad-lib Verb (usu participle), Adjective, Adverb, Noun aggregate ...


10

"public" is a noun = "the general population" "voting" "is a present participle used as an adjective" (per StoneyB) = "the portion that is both eligible to vote and bothers to vote" "Québec's voting public" = "the people in Québec who vote(d)"


9

It's an attributive noun. It makes "president" more specific: it's talking about a president that has something to do with "jobs". In this case, that means a president that encourages or creates job opportunities, reducing unemployment. Similarly, a "dog person" is someone that likes or is good with dogs.


8

Nothing but is not a part of speech. Nothing is a pronoun meaning "no thing". But is a preposition meaning "except", and taking fog as its object; the preposition phrase but fog modifies nothing. Note that the PP can be separated from its host: There was nothing we could see but fog. Nothing will do but the best.


8

Yes, they're synonyms. Or else is two words, so it’s not a part of speech. Or is a conjunction, which introduces a coordinate phrase or clause, meaning that the next phrase/clause is an alternative to the previous one. Else is an adjective or adverb, which means “in addition to what has been covered or seen so far.” Though its meaning is the same as ...


8

A predicative Complement is a Complement of a verb that describes the Subject or Object of that verb. Bob is a doctor. Bob is happy. In the sentences above, the phrases a doctor and happy are Predicative Complements, because they describe the Subject, Bob. The verb FEEL also takes Predicative Complements: I feel hot. I feel an idiot. Adverbs cannot ...


8

The word closed is an adjective, describing the state of your nose after pinching. The structure is called resultative: Wikipedia "resulative" "In linguistics, a resultative (abbreviated RES) is a form that expresses that something or someone has undergone a change in state as the result of the completion of an event. Resultatives appear as ...


7

It can be all three. Verb in participle form: I am shopping. Gerund: Shopping is fun. Noun: I finished the shopping an hour ago.


7

Scotland Police Dogs Training Centre In this phrase, 'Scotland' modifies 'Police,' 'Police' modifies 'Dogs,' 'Dogs' modifies 'Training,' and 'Training' modifies 'Centre.' 'Scotland,' 'Police,' and 'Dogs' are nouns acting like adjectives. These are called noun adjuncts. Here's a nice article explaining it. 'Training' is a verb acting like an adjective. ...


7

“Like” can mean “resemble” or “enjoy”, so You made me like this has two possible meanings: (a) You made me into the person I am now, or (b) You made me enjoy something. For example: (a) We fight all the time now. I find that I’m getting angry even at work. You made me like this. or (b) I never knew I liked asparagus until you started serving it ...


6

It's a performative exclamation. By uttering the word, you're not just describing the action of thanking, you're actually performing the action of thanking. There are a number of words and phrases like this; for example, you can welcome someone simply by saying the word "Welcome!" So why the peculiar grammar? Well, take a look at its history: I ...


6

To summarize the discussion that has happened in the above comments: There is no general single-word replacement for "part of speech" that has any real usefulness. If you want the average English speaker to understand what you mean, just say "part of speech". If you are speaking with academic grammarians, it may be more appropriate to use the term "word ...


6

The ‘Longman Student Grammar of Spoken and Written English’ describes a lot of as a quantifying determiner. That makes the structure of your example [determiner: a lot of] [noun: fun].


6

Oh, dear. It's originally not a word at all, but an "ejaculation" or "interjection"— a (presumedly) spontaneous sound expressive of strong emotion, such as surprise, vexation, joy or grief. It's also used frequently as a "discourse marker" to perform a transition or cover a momentary groping for words. In the early 12th century, however, English ...


6

Succeed is an intransitive verb: it does not take an object. Its subject is companies. Horses run. Men breathe. Companies succeed. These are all complete sentences. In this sentence succeed is specifically an (unmarked) infinitive, the head of an infinitival clause which is the complement of the verb makes, understood in this construction (MAKE ...


6

Fit to VERB in this case† is a construction with the approximate meaning "to the point of VERBing". "I cried fit to bust" means "I cried so hard I almost burst", and you might encountered this in "I laughed fit to bust" or "He was mad fit to bust", meaning "I laughed so hard I almost burst" or "He was so angry he seemed like he would burst". Bust ...


6

Yes, but that's not what's being done here. "Cold" here is used as a noun, referring to an illness where the person has a runny nose, watery eyes, and sneezes. So "Johnny had a cold" means that the person named Johnny had the illness which is called a "cold". "Yesterday" is an adverb saying when he had it: he had it yesterday. That said, there is a very ...


5

The definition of adverb from Webster's College (1) and Collins (2; quoted from definition 1a), via thefreedictionary.com: a member of a class of words functioning as modifiers of verbs, adjectives, other adverbs, or clauses, typically expressing some relation of place, time, manner, degree, means, cause, result, exception, etc. ... a word or group ...


5

A locative or preposition phrase immediately following a noun is usually taken as a restrictive modifier on the noun, if the semantics permit. I have no hesitation in describing your [ii] and [iii] as modifiers on the preceding nouns. Which people screamed? —the people behind him. What kind of parts do they buy? —parts for their cars. But in a different ...


5

Hopefully is an adverb in your excerpt, but it modifies the entire sentence rather than any individual word within it. It is an example of a disjunct, about which Brinton & Brinton (via LinguisticsGirl) say Disjunct adverbials denote the attitude of the speaker toward or judgment of the proposition such as truthfulness of manner of speaking. … The ...


5

I don't know why, but there's something I don't like about that woman. In this sentence, is "why" a noun? If not, what is it? The word "why" in your example is most likely an interrogative word. RATIONALE: The matrix verb "know" can take an interrogative clause as complement. And the complement "Why" in the OP's ...


5

I don't think it is written correctly. I would write: This trouble could soon spill over on to the European Central Bank, thanks to an estimated $1.2 trillion in consumer loans tied to the Russian economy. or This trouble could soon spill over on to the European Central Bank, thanks to consumer loans estimated at $1.2 trillion tied to the Russian ...


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