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The word closed is an adjective, describing the state of your nose after pinching. The structure is called resultative: Wikipedia "resulative" "In linguistics, a resultative (abbreviated RES) is a form that expresses that something or someone has undergone a change in state as the result of the completion of an event. Resultatives appear as ...


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As a noun: Two halves make a whole. ~ Basic math concept As an adjective: "I would shiver the whole night through..." ~ Where Did You Sleep Last Night by Lead Belly As an adverb: The exile of the face takes on a whole new meaning in the context of a sensible world revolving around the self... ~ A Philosophy of Exile, Emmanuel Levinas Do you ...


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We had [to go [to get a book]]. Preliminary point: most speakers treat stative "have" as a lexical verb, but some treat it as an auxiliary. The sentence consists of a main clause (the sentence as a whole) and two embedded subordinate clauses, as bracketed. "Have" is a catenative verb and the subordinate clause "to go to get a book" is its complement. ...


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Yes, it’s a verb. A word has been elided, which is technically correct, but looks a bit odd in this context. And it’s treating “data” as a plural, which is also technically correct (the singular is actually datum), but is very unusual these days. Think of it as “Such data as exists comes from clinical studies...”.


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Pretty is an adverb in this sentence, meaning quite, fairly. See Google/Oxford Dictionary: Adverb to a moderately high degree; fairly. "he looked pretty fit for his age" Note that this usage of "pretty" is informal in register.


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I don't agree with the analysis of these words as "nouns used as adverbs". "Break-dancing" is a compound noun. There is a compound verb "he break-dances", but I would not consider "break" to be an adverb in that phrase. It is part of the verb. Also "Christmas shopping" uses "Christmas" as an attributive noun (which are very common in English) to modify th ...


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"Have to" is used in the sense of "must" to mean something is obligatory. "Must" is an auxiliary verb; but "have" is a main verb. e.g., I must do it. (Subject + auxiliary verb + main verb + object) = I have to to do it. (Subject + main verb + to-infinitive) I will have to do it (Subject + auxiliary verb + main verb + to-infinitive). "We had to go to ...


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Have you eaten all the cake [THAT I made ___ yesterday?] "That" is not a relative pronoun but a subordinator. https://simple.wiktionary.org/wiki/that It's the same subordinator that introduces declarative content clauses, as in Ed told me that he had passed his exam. There are a number of reasons why it's not a pronoun, one of which is that it has ...


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Traditionally it is analyzed as a relative pronoun (a subclass of noun). However, it is now considered a subordinator. Traditional grammar analyses the that which introduces relative clauses as a relative pronoun, comparable to which and who, but we believe that there is a good case for identifying it with the subordinator that which introduces declarative ...


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In the sentence "He made her disappear.", the word disappear is a bare infinitive verb. The phrase "her disappear" is a bare infinitive clause. The bare infinitive is used with certain main verbs, like "make", as described here: Thoughtco "bare infinitive" The zero (or bare) infinitive is used after verbs of ...


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He acted in a cowardly manner. "Cowardly" here is an adjective. We usually have the structure a + adj + noun, which is the case here. The base noun of "cowardly" is "coward", which means "a person who's not brave and is too eager to avoid danger".


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Firstly, why would you need to "find an adverb". If you can understand and communicate effectively, do you need to do this at all? However this doesn't work. At best it can find "Adjuncts", ie words that are not required for the sentence to be grammatically complete. Some adverbs are adjuncts, but so are some adjectives and nouns. ...


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It made me realize something. It helped me [to] realize something. The verb to help is unusual.  It licenses both full and bare infinitives as object complements.  Most verbs that license object complements do so for only one infinitive form, if any.  There are other differences in the kinds of constituents that these two verbs license as object ...


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He alleges another £1m had gone on material purchases based on projections of Arcadia orders he was told were coming down the line. It's a complex sentence with several subordinate (dependent) clauses, some embedded within another: [1] (that) another £1m had gone on material purchases based on projections of Arcadia orders he was told were coming down the ...


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He alleges [that] another million pounds had gone on material purchases based on projections of Arcadia orders [that] he was told were coming down the line.  This sentence is not simple at all.  We should be able to count the finite verbs to discover the number of clauses involved.  He alleges 1 another £1m had 2 gone on material purchases based on ...


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There are (at least) two valid ways to parse this, but the context eliminates all but one. Firstly [Drinking(adjective) tea(noun)](subject) is(verb) [good for health](complement) Here the phrase drinking tea is adjective-noun structure [Drinking(gerund) tea(noun,object of drinking)](subject) is(verb) etc. However while "Drinking chocolate" is idiomatic, ...


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We all felt ill after the meal. "All" belongs to the word class (part of speech) 'determinative'. In your example, "all" is separable and not part of the subject NP but a quantificational adjunct in clause structure. This is evident from the fact that when the verb is an auxiliary it preferentially follows rather than precedes it: We had all felt ill ...


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The simplest way to parse this is to consider "we all" to a compound pronoun. The two words have been brought together and now function as a single "word", although the spelling doesn't (yet) reflect this (y'all is sometimes seen for you all) As such "all" isn't functioning on its own, but "we all" is functioning as a pronoun.


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The function of "being basically good" in this sentence is to describe the conception of people that "she" has, so you can think of it as a kind of adjective. So the "-ing" or "being" isn't meant to convey a tense, but rather to make an adjective out of the verb. The infinitive, at least to my knowledge, can't be used in an adjective context, so "as to be ...


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I searched "The Corpus of Contemporary American English", a collection of a billion or so words from 1990 to 2019, for "the reschedule" and "a reschedule". The search had 2 results with "the" and 3 with "a", that is, not many at all. It's completely understandable, but it might be better to stick with "rescheduling". You can try this yourself: COCA search


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In that use, it's an adverb, modifying "think". See a similar adverb use at AHD "much" adverb 3 and in other dictionaries.


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The first example is ungrammatical. The second example is correct. The third example is grammatical, but it is not comparable to the second. The second example "sincerity and courtesy are ... traits", equates the predicate to the subject. The third example doesn't equate the predicate to the subject, but says that the subject has a particular property. ...


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That car has two doors. The cardinal numbers one, two, three, four etc. belong to the class (part of speech) determinative and they function as determiner to suitable nouns such as "doors" in your example.


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Our blessings come from above. Sorry, but you were taught nonsense! Prepositions take a range of complements comparable to that of verbs: not just noun phrases, of course, but preposition phrases, adverb phrases and clauses (both finite and non-finite). Trad grammar treats "above" as an adverb, but some modern grammars treat it as a preposition, in ...


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The word "above" can be used as a noun in a couple of limited, and one general way. It can mean "heaven", "god" or metaphorically "the boss". This is what is meant in your quote. "Our blessings come from god/heaven" The preposition "above" can also be used a noun elliptically, by removing the noun when the context makes the meaning clear. Is the ...


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Replacing a noun with a more complex expression is using a "noun phrase". For example, "That movie struck me as funny." We can expand "movie" by turning it into a noun phrase: "That Peter Sellers movie 'The Pink Panther' struck me as funny." So, the answer to your question is "Yes, we do it all the time."


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This was answered on english.stackexchange.com """ It looks like nothing more than a typing mistake (typo) to me: "slowly" was intended, but the typist lost focus and accidentally typed the "ing" ending of the following word, instead of "ly". This is an easy kind of mistake to make when typing. All three of the examples you cite look grammatically ...


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The distinction between the gerund and present participle is no longer relevant. Quirk et al. (1985) and Huddleston & Pullum (2002) both reject it: We conclude that there is no difference of form, function, or interpretation that correlates systematically with the traditional distinction between 'gerund' and 'present participle'. The distinction ...


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