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1

Adjectives don't have objects, but the "that" clause is the complement of the adjective sure.


3

This particular use of 'still' means to an even greater degree or in an even greater amount. One example of this usage from Cambridge dictionary is: I'm worried that his car has broken down, or worse still, that he's had an accident. So, the car breaking down is bad, but an accident is worse still - meaning it is bad to a greater degree than the first ...


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[1] Sort [by extension]. [2] We came [by the back road]. In these examples "by" is a preposition functioning as head of the bracketed PPs (preposition phrases). In [1] the PP is an adjunct expressing how something is to be sorted. In [2] the PP is a complement of "came". PPs expressing path are complements because they have to be ...


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Soon it will be hell [to go outside]. This is an extraposition construction, where the dummy pronoun "it" is subject and the bracketed infinitival clause is extraposed subject, outside the verb phrase. The basic (non-extraposed) version is [To go outside] will soon be hell. where this time the infinitival clause is subject. Incidentally, I would ...


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What you need is a parser and there are parsers online. https://www.link.cs.cmu.edu/link/submit-sentence-4.html +-------D*u------+ | +----AN---+--Ss--+--Ost-+ | | | | | my favourite.a sport.n is.v hiking.n Constituent tree: (S (NP My favourite sport) (VP is (NP hiking))) However computers have ...


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