6

So here, the “he” in question is not “baffled by the way the crime was committed,” but he “would” be (“undoubtedly”). I strongly suspect that “he” is not “baffled” primarily because “he” doesn’t know about the crime or how it was committed in the first place. If he later learns about it, for example, then the speaker expects him to be baffled by it. This is ...


5

Who has 'Hamlet' been written by? is grammatically correct, but an unlikely thing for anyone to say. We would use has written of a recent work by a living author. Hilary Mantel has written three novels about Thomas Cromwell. Speaking of a long-dead writer such as Shakespeare, we would say Who wrote 'Hamlet'? or Who was 'Hamlet' written by?


4

1)  The best match in Merriam-Webster's listing is definition 4 — used in [an] auxiliary function to express probability or presumption in past or present time.  Here, it seems to be a presumption about a hypothetical past.  He hadn't been baffled, but he would have been.  2)  Only the first verb in a predicating phrase has tense and attaches to a subject. ...


2

I agree with @Kate Bunting. Here is a little more detail. If you "have public speaking done" then this is present tense and you employ others to do the speaking for you. (causative) If you "have done public speaking", it is present perfect and you did the speaking yourself in the past.


2

English has been eliminating inflections for centuries. The who/whom distinction is in the process of disappearing from U.S. English, but is still recognized by some, particularly when it is preceded by a preposition. Those who do recognize it, moreover, tend to be those most adept at writing formal English. So saying both usages are grammatical is probably ...


2

(Posting an answer because the system won't let me comment.) No. 3 is neither passive nor the present tense. Stay is an intransitive verb, so it can't be used in the passive voice. Somebody else might make you stay, in which case you would have to say 'I was made to stay for the sermon' (past tense) or 'I am being made to stay for the sermon' (present ...


1

Your question isn’t entirely clear, but I believe you are asking about the verb forms. I’ll explain this sentence with that in mind: “Two men were seen running after robbing the bank” THE SHORT ANSWER “Were seen” is the only verb phrase in this sentence. So conjugate this verb as you would conjugate a passive voice verb. “(Be) (past participle)” makes it “...


1

There are two extra words in your second example "even been", although you could just use the word "even" by itself. "Even" is used to show that something is surprising, unusual, unexpected, or extreme. So, the second example is just a list of problems associated with sleeplessness, but the first example which says "it's ...


1

The sentence looks fine to me (as a statistician) although I might have written a model rather than the model. It is worth bearing in mind that the traditional use of the passive in scientific articles does seem slightly dated and you might prefer to rewrite it as Therefore, we fitted the copula model to the data


1

You are asking for more examples for the usage of the word "would." The word "would" is also used as the past tense of the word "will." For example: I will say that is true based on what I know. [All the verbs are present tense: will say, is, know.] VERSUS: I would say that is true if I knew for sure what time the other ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible