45

If person X gave you an object Y, then you can say correctly: I was given Y by X. I received Y from X. In a totally different meaning, you could say "I was given a bottle of wine from Chile" ("from" means where the wine came from), or "I received a letter by mail" (the mode of transportation). Just noticed you can combine it: I was given a ...


28

Using "by" is correct. From would also be acceptable. Grammarly seems to compare your sentence with one using "received". I received two tickets by my mother (not correct, this must be "from") However, your sentence uses a passive verb form, and "by" is the usual way to introduce the (semantic) subject. Unless there is other context (such as contrast),...


13

"The electricity was turned off" implies "... by somebody". It means that there is a person (known or unknown) who chose to do it. You would say this when you know that the electricity company is deliberately turning off the power to save fuel. On the other hand, "the electricity turn off" doesn't imply that somebody did it. If you think the power cut is ...


3

1- one of the usage of perfect tense is to show an activity happens before another activity. As a result, it seems your sentence is incorrect, because you uses "has been writing", which is present perfect continuous, and you used "turned off", which is simple past. Therefore your sentence tends to be "Randall had been writing his paper when the electricity ...


2

The difference between "was turned off" and "turned off"   Randall has been writing his paper when the electricity suddenly turned off. Randall has been writing his paper when the electricity was suddenly turned off. "The electricity turned off" suggests that the electricity turned off by itself. "The electricity was turned off" suggests ...


1

As others have said, "the electricity was turned off" implies that somebody turned off the electricity. If that's not what you mean, then you need to find a different way to phrase it. Unfortunately, "the electricity turned off" is, at best, awkward, and arguably not grammatical. If you look at Merriam-Webster, "turn off" in the context of electricity or ...


1

This is a context where preposition usage has changed over time... (I multiplied the aid values by 4 so one chart shows the same preference shift for both words at once.) It's a risky business assigning precise and consistent meanings to English prepositions. In the specific context of linking a "result" (or method of achieving a result) to some relevant ...


1

A and B are misformed passives: the direct object of inform is the person informed, not the information, so "the police" must be the subject of the passive form. In British English, D is overwhelmingly more natural than C (the question doesn't arise whether police is a plural or a collective, because we often use a plural verb with a collective, especially ...


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