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1

There are two extra words in your second example "even been", although you could just use the word "even" by itself. "Even" is used to show that something is surprising, unusual, unexpected, or extreme. So, the second example is just a list of problems associated with sleeplessness, but the first example which says "it's ...


0

First off, the usual position of the agent is as the subject of an active sentence: He will buy the house next month. In a passive sentence the agent, if included, can go in either position. There's no real difference in meaning. We tend to put long phrases at the end of sentences so if the agent is a complex phrase it would be better at the end: ... ...


1

You are asking for more examples for the usage of the word "would." The word "would" is also used as the past tense of the word "will." For example: I will say that is true based on what I know. [All the verbs are present tense: will say, is, know.] VERSUS: I would say that is true if I knew for sure what time the other ...


0

I can't imagine what auxiliary verb you expect to see.  What I can do is explain why none fits under a traditional analysis.   Maogamalcha ... suddenly found itself taken by assault.... When we disregard the parenthetical clause, we find one predicate.  That predicate is formed by the past-tense verb "found".  The verb "found" is ...


0

Maogamalcha, which a little before had boasted of being impregnable, and had laughed to scorn the vain efforts of the emperor, suddenly found itself [taken by assault and undergoing the extremities of sack and pillage]. There is no omission here. "Found" is a catenative verb and the subordinate past-participial clause "taken by assault and ...


0

No verb has been omitted. However, found itself taken... and undergoing could have been expressed as found that it had been taken... and was undergoing. To find oneself followed by a participle is quite a common construction, expressing in a concise way find that [verb] is being or has been done to oneself.


1

The sentence looks fine to me (as a statistician) although I might have written a model rather than the model. It is worth bearing in mind that the traditional use of the passive in scientific articles does seem slightly dated and you might prefer to rewrite it as Therefore, we fitted the copula model to the data


4

1)  The best match in Merriam-Webster's listing is definition 4 — used in [an] auxiliary function to express probability or presumption in past or present time.  Here, it seems to be a presumption about a hypothetical past.  He hadn't been baffled, but he would have been.  2)  Only the first verb in a predicating phrase has tense and attaches to a subject. ...


1

Your question isn’t entirely clear, but I believe you are asking about the verb forms. I’ll explain this sentence with that in mind: “Two men were seen running after robbing the bank” THE SHORT ANSWER “Were seen” is the only verb phrase in this sentence. So conjugate this verb as you would conjugate a passive voice verb. “(Be) (past participle)” makes it “...


-1

It's a good question that points up to some not so well‐known issues of learning grammar. The question poised by the OP is that h/she must choose a right grammatically answer specifying the precise grammatical manner of the sentence about Charles Dickens from the available three options. After some short personal reviewing the experienced substantive ...


6

So here, the “he” in question is not “baffled by the way the crime was committed,” but he “would” be (“undoubtedly”). I strongly suspect that “he” is not “baffled” primarily because “he” doesn’t know about the crime or how it was committed in the first place. If he later learns about it, for example, then the speaker expects him to be baffled by it. This is ...


0

"Object to" can be put into the passive voice as follows: The proposal was objected to. or The proposal was objected to by him. FYI, the use of passive voice in contexts like this is as ugly as sin.


0

Use do as a "shim": Present Perfect Continuous Active: I have been buying and selling for 3 days. Present Perfect Continuous Passive: Buying and selling for 3 days has been done by me.


2

(Posting an answer because the system won't let me comment.) No. 3 is neither passive nor the present tense. Stay is an intransitive verb, so it can't be used in the passive voice. Somebody else might make you stay, in which case you would have to say 'I was made to stay for the sermon' (past tense) or 'I am being made to stay for the sermon' (present ...


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