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2 votes
Accepted

"When I was playing she was cooking" and "she had been cooking"

Sentence 2 is wrong. Sentence 1 could do with a bit of a tweak. The narration of past events can indeed be done using different tenses, for example: I was cooking when she knocked at the door I had ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 104k
0 votes

past perfect to explain the completion of an action

How to use Past perfect tense? I just ordered the book after seeing this aleatorick's post on the blog (probably as soon as he had posted it). The past perfect expresses the idea that something ...
James Mathai's user avatar
0 votes

I had/have saved up for months to afford it

1) is fine, Yesterday, I bought a new laptop. I had saved up for months to afford it. 2) is not. You don't follow a simple past with a present perfect in those two related things. Use the simple past ...
Lambie's user avatar
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1 vote
Accepted

I had/have saved up for months to afford it

People might say it as in your second version, but it’s not standard grammar. The saving up that is relevant is that which created the conditions (of sufficiency of resources) that were already ...
Paul Tanenbaum's user avatar
0 votes

Are you coming to see the movie?

The idiomatic choice for most dialects of English is B: No. I have already seen it. Option A, "I already saw it" is common but sounds like an Americanism to my British English ears. BrEng ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 104k
0 votes

Past simple V/s Past Perfect - was already left and had already left.

Sentence a) is incorrect a) When we reached the platform, the train was already left/ gone. This sentence is past simple tense in the passive voice. 'was left' and 'was gone' = be verb + past ...
James Mathai's user avatar
1 vote
Accepted

What should I use (Past perfect or Past Simple)

The main variation in your answer is the non usage of past perfect tense. The answer key has correctly used Past perfect tense wherever necessary. Please note - Past perfect tense is the past of the ...
James Mathai's user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

When I had watched TV

The past perfect makes sense in dialog 2, but not dialog 1. Dialog 2 When I had watched TV, I did my homework. This means the same thing as "after I finished watching tv, I did my homework next....
Friendly Racoon's user avatar
0 votes

Why is it not past perfect for the word 'left'?

A very important use of the Past Perfect Tense is that it is used to clarify which event happened earlier when two actions were completed in the past. I had gone out in the garden when he left. It ...
James Mathai's user avatar
1 vote

Use of past perfect tense

No difference in meaning - finite verb or gerund The past perfect tense is used to describe a past event that occurred prior to another past event. 1. Simple past tense can be used if 'before' is ...
James Mathai's user avatar
0 votes

Are you coming to see the movie?

As far as speech goes, you are safe to use either A or B. I would stay away from C when talking with people. The past perfect is used primarily when telling a story. The most correct answer is A. ...
ethan lamb's user avatar
6 votes
Accepted

Are you coming to see the movie?

The grammar is correct in all three, but the meaning is probably best expressed with a present perfect. Your reply is giving the reason why you don't want to see the movie now. That is a clear ...
James K's user avatar
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