52

You would use We were married for [X time] if the marriage has ended, for example you are now divorced, or your spouse has died. You are saying that the duration of the marriage is fixed, and will not change. You would use We have been married for [X time] if the marriage is still in effect. The statement is accurate as of the current date, but there is an ...


13

With "already", they mean the same thing. The function implied by "already" is "a completed action in the past with present result". The difference between the two types is Americans tend to prefer the simple past version, while everyone else --including Canadians-- prefers the present perfect. The only exception is with 5. &...


4

The events are in the past, and the writer (who is the child involved) is looking back on them from a time well after the events. Thus "would remain" is chosen, to indicate that the concerns remained a hunch for a time period now long ended, specifically through the end of the pregnancy when the birth revealed the actual condition. This form, with &...


3

"Fireworks are supposed to have been invented in China." Tell me if I'm wrong but it is present perfect "Fireworks are supposed to have been invented in China" is not a use of the present perfect. This is a common misunderstanding. The present perfect involves the use of a present-tense form of the auxiliary "have" followed ...


3

I would say there there is no significant difference in meaning between examples 1 and 2, and that both might be naturally used by fluent speakers. I think 2 would be more likely in the US at least. In this context the "have" doesn't really contribute anything, and most people would leave it out. I suppose that technically 1 is past-perfect rather ...


3

A statement about an ongoing condition should definitely not use simple past tense. The most common is to use present perfect tense ("have" + past participle): We have been married for 15 years. You could refer to the marriage ceremony itself as a past event. This would not be typical for responding to the question, "How long have you been ...


2

Strictly speaking, the present perfect is more precise. The simple past is completely fine too though, and you can still qualify the simple past to get that "present perfect" meaning, with an adverbial phrase like "just now." For instance, "I just now stepped out onto the balcony" and "I didn't understand what you said ...


2

If one verb is in any way governed by or subordinated to another, the second verb is non-finite: I wish to leave. I must stay. I am singing. He made me stay. However, if the verbs are joined by a conjunction, or are parallel to each other, no such grammatical link between them exists, and both may be finite and tensed: I came, saw and conquered. He walked ...


2

Your question is based on a misconception. There is absolutely no rule in the English language saying: if the first verb in a clause is in the simple past, a following verb must be in the root form. You have extrapolated from a relatively uncommon form to create a non-existent rule. In traditional grammar, “suffer” would be classed as an infinitive. The ...


2

Both are correct. I hope that is simple enough. If you want more, see below about British English, simple past and present perfect. In American English, the form "I just finished" (past tense) is very common. In British English, a present perfect is more often used "I've just finished".


2

The meanings are different. "My parents have fallen in love and (have) got married" means it has happened recently. So you were born before they fell in love and got married. It is possible :-) You probably need the simple past. "My parents fell in love and got married." This simply means it happened. Only a newborn baby can say, "I ...


2

Well, if you accept the definition the dictionaries give of AGO, like for example Merriam-Webster: earlier than the present time (that is, earlier than NOW, the time of speech), then your expression of time five months ago is very definite. So your sentence should be: Five months ago (which is in August 2020), I decided to learn (how) to play the piano. (...


2

Ago generally takes the past tense, as you are looking back on the event. It was 30 years ago that something happened. You can rephrase it using since, which takes the present tense and uses now as its perspective: It is (now) 30 years since something happened. Narrators often use the historical present tense in these situations: It is 30 years before ...


2

Despite what you may have been taught, the past perfect is not about the order that events happened. It is a choice that a speaker or writer makes, to set or maintain a "temporal viewpoint" - to look back on events from some later time. English speakers often do not bother to use it when that temporal relationship is made clear in some other way. ...


2

They could apply to exactly the same circumstances; but they have different implications. I didn't have a tablet before says that just before winning it, I didn't have one. I might have had one a while ago. I haven't had a tablet before suggests that I have never had a tablet. More precisely, it says that over some relevant period extending up to the ...


2

They would both be grammatically correct (but write Moon's surface instead of Moon surface). The first sentence is in the present tense; the second one is in the past tense. There's kind of a nuanced difference that using the present tense might imply he stepped on the Moon recently (as if you're just reacting to it), or it could imply that no one else has ...


2

However, I didn't find this on Stackexchange in the context of YouTube, where likes and dislikes are discrete actions rather than reactions. So saying "I've never seen a video on YouTube that hasn't been disliked by people." means at least one person put a dislike on each one. while saying "I've never seen a video on YouTube that wasn't ...


2

Both sentences are correct and idiomatic. Which one you use really just depends on the context. The use of wasn't would signify at some point or period in the past. The use of hasn't been also refers to the past but implies that the dislike continues up until the present day. Take a slightly different example to understand the difference. Imagine that two ...


2

Some people think the invention of fireworks must have happened over a thousand years ago. In the OP's sentence Fireworks are supposed to have been invented in China. the focus is not "when" but "where". In other words, the statement is focused on China and, presumably, its deserved reputation for resourcefulness and skills in problem-...


2

"I was rescued" of course refers to an event in the past. "I have been rescued" refers to the very recent past. For example, a person who falls over might call out "I have fallen!", but later when they recall the same event they would more likely say "I fell".


2

The idea that "we use past perfect in a sequence of events to show that the action expressed with that tense was before the other one" is an unhelpful simplification. We use the past perfect when we are referring to an event from the perspective of a later time in the past. That later time may be another event, but (especially in narrative) there ...


2

There’s a slight difference. “We read” implies a completed action, whereas “we have read” implies an action that may continue. Which is best depends on which you mean. That said, we generally prefer to stick with the simple past for simplicity because such slight differences often don’t matter. Don’t use a more complicated tense when a simple one suffices. ...


2

I see a slightly different meaning, but not of much practical importance. Where did you think I was all this time? - All this time, where were you imagining that I was? Where do you think I have been all this time? - Where (now) do you think I was? Your version Where did you think I have been...? is not obviously wrong, but seems to me slightly illogical.


2

In all do-support constructions, and in all auxiliary verb (helper verb) constructions, the tense is indicated by the auxiliary verb (do, have, is) and not by the main verb (enjoy, enjoyed, enjoying) Do support For questions, negations, and the emphatic use of "do" in the present tense the structure is always "do/does/did" + base-form I ...


2

If I understand you correctly, what you'd like to know is if a sentence such as the following is possible: When I was younger, I could only watch television if I had finished my homework first. The past perfect (had finished) is fine here. The entire scenario refers to a repeated, iterative situation in the past, not to a single event. To summarize, the past ...


2

She could have used "I cycled" in the past tense. She is referring to her condition, and not the time so I think her sentence is acceptable. Consider: I have fallen over while ice-skating. The phrase "while ice skating" doesn't refer to a particular time (I have been ice skating many times) and the sentence means "falling over ...


2

In your example sentence the entirety of the action takes place in the past. You took the class in the past and the person you like took it. You were both alive back then and may have made a good match. Whether you or they are still alive has nothing to do with your example sentence. The question is asking you about your past experience. It is not asking ...


2

When telling a story, even a brief anecdote, the simple past is the time of the story itself, and past perfect is what happened before the main story line to give context to the simple past sentences. That said, while telling one story, especially in conversation, it's quite natural to skip backwards and tell a story that happened before that one in the ...


2

This is "future in the past". Historically, various modals were originally in pairs, present and past: will - would can - could may - might shall - should All the historically past forms have their own separate meanings now, but they are also used as past tense forms in some contexts. The most common context is reported speech: He said "I ...


2

This is "future in the past" The story is being told in the past tense. It is a past tense narrative. Then there is an event that is in the future of that past time. For this we use "would" instead of "will". Compare a present tense narrative John has a guitar. He practices every day. He will be a famous pop star when he ...


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