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1

Gilligan's Island, unlike Genghis Khan, still exists: you cannot share a beer with a dead warlord, but you can still watch the show. Whether it stars or starred Bob Denver depends on what the verb means: does it mean that he is seen in a prominent role (present), or that he participated prominently (past)?


2

Despite what you may have been taught, the past perfect is not about the order that events happened. It is a choice that a speaker or writer makes, to set or maintain a "temporal viewpoint" - to look back on events from some later time. English speakers often do not bother to use it when that temporal relationship is made clear in some other way. ...


0

As I wrote in my comment, the first version of your question would have been useful to may here. But nonetheless, I will try answering for both of them. It turned out that what happened was different from what I had/expected in my mind. The resultant situation is something that happened later in time than when you made predictions about the same. And what ...


0

Gilligan's Island is no longer on television. It is a show from the past. To discuss it we will use past tense. *It was on in the 1960s. It starred Bob Denver etc. The confusion comes from the very first sentence, Gilligan's Island is an American sitcom. The usage can best be explained by asking someone, Is Gilligan's Island an American sitcom? You will ...


-1

As a native US English speaker, when I read your example for Gilligan's Island using the present tense, it sounds to me like it's describing a show that is currently on air. In this example, using the past tense makes it clear that it's talking about a show that is no longer running. I don't think the present-tense example is necessarily wrong; it's just a ...


2

If one verb is in any way governed by or subordinated to another, the second verb is non-finite: I wish to leave. I must stay. I am singing. He made me stay. However, if the verbs are joined by a conjunction, or are parallel to each other, no such grammatical link between them exists, and both may be finite and tensed: I came, saw and conquered. He walked ...


2

Your question is based on a misconception. There is absolutely no rule in the English language saying: if the first verb in a clause is in the simple past, a following verb must be in the root form. You have extrapolated from a relatively uncommon form to create a non-existent rule. In traditional grammar, “suffer” would be classed as an infinitive. The ...


0

The present perfect is not required when talking about the recent past. In this case, the second verb is talking about a specific time in the past, namely the second time the documents were reviewed, and recency has already been implied by the first verb. Moreover, without context, it is not clear that the present perfect was used to establish recency of ...


2

Both are correct. I hope that is simple enough. If you want more, see below about British English, simple past and present perfect. In American English, the form "I just finished" (past tense) is very common. In British English, a present perfect is more often used "I've just finished".


0

It has more to do with context than strict tense usage. Consider contracts that were signed last year and compare these two versions Last year the company has signed contracts to equip two large factories. Last year the company signed contracts to equip two large factories. where clearly the second is correct. With more recent case of this year, both are ...


0

After further research, I found the below answer:- Simple Present - It generally is used for the activities that have been performed many times. Present Perfect - Basically, for the activities that were either performed once/or for the first time or never performed earlier. So considering the above example, the present perfect tense should be appropriate. ...


2

The meanings are different. "My parents have fallen in love and (have) got married" means it has happened recently. So you were born before they fell in love and got married. It is possible :-) You probably need the simple past. "My parents fell in love and got married." This simply means it happened. Only a newborn baby can say, "I ...


1

I don't know the credentials of OP's source (Trudy Aronson), but so far as I'm concerned, any sentence of the general form [subject] didn't [infinitive verb] yet is inherently invalid (or at least, "awkward" compared to Past Perfect). Here's what Cambridge Dictionary has to say about it... We use yet as an adverb to refer to a time which starts in ...


0

Yet is perfectly acceptable and common in the past tense, especially in the present perfect. Yet most often means "up to the present/stated time". This could be in the present or the past tense. In the examples above, the first reply is the better one. I haven’t written the letter yet... This is because there is a temporal relation to the present....


0

We don't use since to modify a time like this, except in constructions like It is now 50 years since the beginning of his career. In any other context, only after works .


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