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In sentence 1: She wanted to thoroughly clean up the house in-and-out. I think ", inside and outside", preceded by a comma, would be more idiomatic than "in-and-out". In sentence 2, the use of "were to have played" is correct, but it's uncommon. It might be better to use "would have". With singular "game", ...


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(a) Yes, it could imply that you sat down next to John voluntarily. (b) I sat could mean that you were seated next to him for the whole journey. If you had no choice but to sit next to him (there was no other seat, or he came to sit next to you) you could say I had to sit next to John or I found myself sitting next to john.


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a) Not really. It doesn't imply but, at the same time, it doesn't means you sat by his side willingly. b) In this context, this could mean it happened in a matter of seconds as well it happened during the whole road to school. It depends of your interpretation. My tip is that you specify that you passed the whole road to school by his side, for example: I ...


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Simple past is normally used with “additional” information or details about when it happened even if it is not very specific. Example: I lived in Europe in my childhood”. If you use a present perfect tense you basically talk about some action in the past without giving a specific time frame. The reason for not talking about when it happened might be ...


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That's because the Past perfect indicates something that is happened before the main event or the other event in the sentence


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To explain the difference we must add several words to each example: - Do you know how to get to the Trafalgar Square from here? ‐ Yes, of course. I must take to the right from the nearest corner and go for half a mile straight. – Well. You're perfectly right. Is this your first time in London or have you been to London before? ‐ What do you want to see in ...


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In this example, you need present perfect continuous, which is used to describe an event that began at some point in the past and has continued up until the present. You are late. I have been waiting for 20 minutes. (I have only just now stopped waiting for you, because you've arrived.) Past simple would be used for an action completed in the past: You were ...


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Both of your sentences are grammatically correct. Now, let's go back to their difference in meaning. She has seen the real meaning in these messages. ( This could mean that She has just seen .... , or she has seen at some indefinite time during the day/week, etc. ); She saw the real meaning in these messages. ( - implies a terminated period of ...


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As you say, using had multiple times like that is not grammatical. Often there is no need to use any grammatical structure to make the exact sequence of events clear as it will be immediately apparent from the context; in your example, simply saying "I found out that they had confessed that she had stolen the car which had been bought by the people who had ...


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The correct sentence is definitely 2, because the morning is finished, for a past event a past tense should be used. As for the influence in the present, if you want to use Present Perfect there must be a connection with the present moment. Let's develop your situation. For example, your friend looked at you and asked, "Why are you looking pale?" (the ...


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"Did you ever" would be better for something that you might have done in the past but wouldn't do now, like "Did you ever go to camp as a kid?", whereas "have you ever" implies that it's something that they may still be able to do now. Knowing the context, I agree that "have you ever" would make more sense.


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I would choose A because it sounds more reasonable. I think the author wants to stress that he/she has watched it for a period of unfinished time (all his/her life). But "today" is finished and definite. Also, he emphasizes the action of "watch" for today instead of the experience. If someone asked "have you watched today's match? It was awesome!", then you ...


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"Finally, we meet!" is the correct form. The present tense is perfectly appropriate, because the act of "meeting" is more than just the moment in time in which the contact was made. It is usually considered to span over the entire time the people are together during that encounter. We may say "Finally, we met!" if you are later discussing (online, perhaps) ...


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The quote in its original form: "Ever since I was first read to, then started reading to myself, there has never been a line read that I didn't hear." The author meant that she heard every sentence read at the time of its reading, either spoken by someone reading it to her, or by her internal mental voice speaking along with her reading. If she said "that I ...


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