3

The structure 'might had' is ungrammatical. If you are using a modal auxiliary verb (might, may, could, etc) to express something in the past, it has to be in the format have + past participle. I might have passed the exam if I had studied a harder. You might have said something that made him angry. He may have been at the party, but I can't be sure.


3

I would suggest first looking this up in any dictionary. You'll most often get no results——that is, 0 results found in your search. As shown here. You can also use WordReference to show you conjugated forms. According to usage examples in the OED, glowed is the past participle of glow. Glown is indicated as a form, but a rare form, and not cited in any of ...


2

The past tense of pain is pained, as in "it pained me". What you are talking about is the passive: present, I am pained by your disrespectful behaviour, or past, I was pained by your disrespectful behaviour. I think it is probably more common to use pained adjectivally: present: I am pained to see you behave that way. past: I was pained to ...


2

The word must has two meanings as a modal verb: one indicates necessity, and the other probability. The necessity meaning cannot be used about things in the past: instead, you use the past tense of have to. As an example, if you use reported speech you have to backshift the tense: He said "I must go to the dentist" He told me that he must go to ...


2

may and might take the bare infinitive of the verb that follows I may [to] go ---> I may go I might [to] go ---> I might go I may [to] have Covid 19 ---> I may have Covid 19 I might [to] have Covid 19 ---> I might have Covid 19 I may [to] have gone ---> I may have gone I might [to] have gone ---> I might have gone No English verbs have a ...


1

As you said for yourself, there is relevance to the present situation. So grammatically present perfect would come there. Why did the person emailed me "I did not forget you" [...]? Well this maybe because he is not a native speaker. Or he might have thought no-one would notice the mistake or the slip-up. Or he might have thought that this is the ...


1

In your example "would" is only correct as a conditional (following a subjunctive). For example: Q: If you were to win the competition, would you be using these spices? A: If we were to win, we would be using these spices from next time onwards. So, yes it does refer to the future but the conditional future.


1

We make mistakes. I'm sorry for the mistakes that I made. I'm sorry for the mistakes that I have made. Both of the above are grammatically correct. They just use different verb tenses, e.g. I saw it. I have seen it. I made mistakes. I have made made mistakes. All are correct.


1

They make sense, so there is nothing wrong with them. It certainly is a habitual usage of "would" with the meaning of "used to", and is the backshift ( the past form ) of the modal "will". Adding the adverb "often" wouldn't make much difference expect for of course giving more emphasis to the auxiliary. You would still ...


1

No, they are not the same. You asked me if they came or not. unequivocally asks about whether a particular event in the past happened or not: either they came, or they did not. (Of course I might not know the answer). You asked me if they were coming or not. also asks about something in the past, but it could be asking two different things: at the ...


1

Used to implies some change has taken place - in the past, some action was done regularly ("I used to ride my bike to school") or some state was true ("this used to be more fun"), but at some point that changed (I stopped riding my bike, or I don't go to school anymore, and the fun thing became less fun). And the negative version says ...


1

I used to refers to a situation in the past that lasted for some time. So - I didn't have a phone (at a particular point in time). I didn't use to or I used not to have a phone = There was a period of time before I acquired one.


1

The infinitive particle is always followed by the base form of the verb, so to meet, never to met. To met cannot occur in a sentence (unless if the two words are in different constituents and happen to come together, e.g. The lawyer I sent the emails to met up with us last week: The lawyer [I sent the emails to] met up with us last week). If the infinitive ...


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