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Past tense. "when Tom went [was going, would go, used to go] to high school."?

Go in go to school is not the same as the normal word go: it is already habitual. Therefore your A2 and B2 are not idiomatic in this sense. You can say He would go to school ... but this would refer ...
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I didn't eat since breakfast vs. I haven't eaten since breakfast

It is not standard grammar to use since with a simple past. Standard grammar calls for the present perfect there. This is true in AmE and BrE. I haven't eaten since breakfast. He hasn't seen her since ...
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Is it I knew I was into or I knew I am into you?

The second sentence is correct. But the phrase has an informal character. Although I've been hearing this expression for some 30 or more years, it still carries a tone of fadishness, at least to my ...
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Yesterday was the best day of my life

Thanks JEL. It seems like 'is/are' is used for general truths, not specific. E.g. Correct: "Those shoes from yesterday were mine." Wrong: "Those shoes from yesterday are mine." E.g....
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before anyone had got up VS before anyone got up

I did my exercises before anyone got up simply states the order in which things happened. The writer had envisaged the time of day at which they planned to do the exercises. "It will be quiet ...
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1 vote
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Proper tense for this sentence? "The rapid spread of water-borne diseases in the town derive(d/s) from bacteria in the polluted rivers."

It is a poorly designed question. In the first sentence, about oily fish, “derived” is correct. It is being used as a passive participle and does not indicate a tense. In the second sentence, about ...
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Using is vs was when talking about the past

Both sentences (1 & 2) are correct. In sentence 1, the verb in the main clause is in the present tense (is). So, the verb in the subordinate clause can be in any tense (liked). Therefore, the 1st ...
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2 votes

Why is it right to use the Past Perfect tense, not the Past Perfect Continuous in this sentence?

No. With a negative, for ages does not emphasise - or in any way relate to - the duration of the activity. It refers to the length of time since the activity last happened. You could also say I hadn't ...
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Can present perfect and present simple be used in the same sentence?

Yes, present perfect and the present can be combined in a sentence idiomatically and grammatically. I feel very sick so I have scheduled an appointment with my doctor. Now with respect to your ...
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"Is written" or "was written"?

You're absolutely correct. It is common to say that something "was" written by someone: This year's speech was written by NN, who's in Mrs B's class. Because no specific time is mentioned, ...
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1 vote

"Is written" or "was written"?

When speaking about an event, several tenses are possible. A speech has both event and authorship aspects. It also depends on whether you are introducing the speaker, or telling someone about the ...
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The past simple of "gaslight" – "gaslighted" or "gaslit"?

I'm not an English major or anything, but I think it's safe to say the following about 'gaslighted' as opposed to 'gaslit': The word 'light' can be used as a noun as in "Can you hand me a ...
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Is it better to match tenses here

It is optional, and could depend on whether the focus of your conversation is the "trip to the shop" or "the state of the phone". So if you are standing with the (broken) phone in ...
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3 votes

“Matt was calling while we were having dinner” Is this correct?

The best answer is (A). There is no grammar mistake in (B) but it is unlikely to be used. The verb "call" has a number of meanings, from "shout" to "guess", but the ...
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was past perfect used to emphasize the event (journey)

In the past you had started a journey to Italy, but it wasn't completed. is unnatural. We could consider You had previously started a journey to Italy, but it wasn't completed. or You had ...
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1 vote

Asking was formula

I think you are mistaking this for a past progressive tense, but it is not. It is the past simple passive. There is the past progressive active, which emphasizes the subject "Perry:" Perry ...
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Asking was formula

"Was accompanied" is legal here, it's just suggesting past tense. This [was + past-tense-verb + by] structure is generally allowed: "The man was hurt by the accusations", "the ...
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1 vote

Why is "had started " used in this example?

we need to understand what function past perfect tense serves to answer this question. in that spirit: The past perfect refers to a time earlier than before now. It is used to make it clear that one ...
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Past tense in relative clauses to describe facts and general truth

The sentence is fine as is - except for a couple of unrelated points: One goes to school, not at school, and "public school" is ambiguous if you are writing for an international audience (...
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Past tense in relative clauses to describe facts and general truth

Your sentence seems fine to me, except that I wouldn't put a comma after adults. This makes it look as though who have been at a public school is a description of adults in general, rather than an ...
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