47 votes

"Carrie has arrived at the airport for two hours." - Is this sentence grammatically correct?

It's grammatical, but it doesn't make much sense, a bit like Noam Chomsky's famous sentence, "Colorless green ideas sleep furiously." To arrive is something that happens instantaneously, not over a ...
David Richerby's user avatar
16 votes

"Carrie has arrived at the airport for two hours." - Is this sentence grammatically correct?

Carrie has arrived at the airport for two hours. This sentence does not work in English. To arrive is an action that is conceived of as taking place at once, not over time. So using a duration (for ...
Alan Carmack's user avatar
16 votes
Accepted

Reporting loss of a bag at a police station - which is more appropriate, "I lost my bag" or "I have lost my bag"?

Either one is acceptable. From the questions on this site, I have the impression that a lot of ELL students think that for any given situation, there is only one appropriate English tense. This isn't ...
Peter Shor 's user avatar
15 votes

"Carrie has arrived at the airport for two hours." - Is this sentence grammatically correct?

I would use the present perfect verb (the point of the exercise being use of the present perfect) "has been" Carrie has been at the airport for two hours.
John Burger's user avatar
  • 2,525
10 votes

"Carrie has arrived at the airport for two hours." - Is this sentence grammatically correct?

If you want to keep most of the words from the original sentence, I would use: Carrie has been at the airport ever since she arrived two hours ago. The original sentence's focus is on the arrival ...
jfren484's user avatar
  • 304
9 votes
Accepted

"You've called the wrong number" or "You called the wrong number"

Either one is ok. We know exactly when the person called the wrong number - it was when you heard the phone ring, right before you picked up. The present perfect tense ("you've called") is fine ...
Mixolydian's user avatar
  • 8,687
8 votes

Current relevance: "She has broken her leg" vs. "She broke her leg yesterday"

The present perfect tense is a present tense. The implied time is "Now". So "She has broken her leg yesterday" is wrong because the verb from means "now" which contradicts "yesterday". Roughly the ...
James K's user avatar
  • 218k
6 votes

"Have forgotten" or "forgot"?

Grammatically, either version is fine for OP's context, but most people would probably go for the shorter Simple Past version most of the time (if only because it is shorter and simpler). The ...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
6 votes

Haven't found or didn't find?

TL/DR: I haven't found it. Implies you will keep looking, as in I haven't found it...yet. I didn't find it. Implies that you will not continue the search.
DTRT's user avatar
  • 5,034
5 votes
Accepted

"Where were you yesterday?" vs. "Where have you been yesterday?"

The second sentence is incorrect. Whatever your source for the "present consequences" rule, I'm not sure what they meant by that. I don't think that's how the present perfect is usually described. We ...
Jay's user avatar
  • 65.5k
5 votes

Is my English tutor mistaken? Perfect tenses seem incorrect in this sentence

You use different ways to describe different things. Each of the four ways you said are correct in the right situation. So insisting that only one can be used is daft. Continuous vs simple is about ...
gnasher729's user avatar
  • 3,871
5 votes
Accepted

Question in present perfect, but answer in past simple. Why not a past simple question?

The "rule" you quoted is simply wrong - or, rather, it is a huge oversimplification of a complicated situation. It states that the choice of which form to use depends only on objective facts ...
Colin Fine's user avatar
  • 75.3k
4 votes
Accepted

Present perfect or simple past, which one to use when a specific time is not mentioned?

There's a lot of confusion around this, and a lot of half-true "rules" are taught. The actual rule for the present perfect is fairly simple. The present perfect is a present tense, designating a ...
StoneyB on hiatus's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

What is the difference among these sentences: "haven't been" vs "aren't" vs "weren't" vs "hadn't"

If it weren't for the word lately, the choice would simply depend on what exactly we've noticed. For simplicity we'll ignore the negation and suppose we noticed one of... 1: you have been doing it ...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
4 votes

"Carrie has arrived at the airport for two hours." - Is this sentence grammatically correct?

The syntax is valid but the semantics is not. see https://english.stackexchange.com/questions/29504/syntactically-correct-semantically-incorrect-sentence Any native speaker would conclude that the ...
mt_'s user avatar
  • 41
4 votes

difference between "Have been" and "was"

Past Simple was is used for something that finished in the past: I worked there for five years - but I don't any more Present perfect have been is used for something that started in the past, ...
JavaLatte's user avatar
  • 59.6k
4 votes

Present Perfect vs. Past Simple with unfinished time periods: this week

Present perfect is the more likely answer, but both choices are possible, depending on whether you view 'this week' as incomplete (>present perfect) or complete (>past simple), which in turn depends ...
Sydney's user avatar
  • 7,516
4 votes

Current relevance: "She has broken her leg" vs. "She broke her leg yesterday"

You can’t use present perfect when you are mentioning when something happened. That is why you cannot use present perfect in the second example.
Drossel's user avatar
  • 508
4 votes
Accepted

Current relevance: "She has broken her leg" vs. "She broke her leg yesterday"

She broke her leg yesterday This statement tells us when the person's leg got broken. The emphasis is shifted to a specific point in the past; she is not breaking her leg now, ergo "She is ...
Mari-Lou A's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

I want to make witty comments, but I don't know if I used the tenses correctly or not

As the subject matter is quite bawdy, the use of "just experienced it" is far too formal. The end of a joke is called a 'punchline' because it is meant to be 'punchy', and have an immediate impact. ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 101k
3 votes
Accepted

"Carrie has arrived at the airport for two hours." - Is this sentence grammatically correct?

Both your sentence and your friend's sentence have already diverted from the meaning of the original sentence. The original sentence is "Carrie arrived at the airport two hours ago." From that ...
Kalin's user avatar
  • 54
3 votes

"Carrie has arrived at the airport for two hours." - Is this sentence grammatically correct?

To me, the fact that the exercise is an "English exercise related to the simple past & present perfect tenses" would lead me to believe that: Carrie has.... is a prompt to write in the present ...
pob's user avatar
  • 31
3 votes

"Jack {lived/has lived/has been living} in New York for ten years. Now he lives here."

Yes, only A is correct. B and C imply that the action (living in New York) is ongoing, so they only make sense if Jack is currently living in New York. The context is important here. It would be OK to ...
Andy Schweig's user avatar
  • 1,225
3 votes
Accepted

Present Perfect or Past Simple (two similar samples) for unspecified time

The simple past expresses the past action or event as something that occurred in the past. The present perfect expresses the past action or event as something that occurred in the past, but from a ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 124k
3 votes
Accepted

I've been living-went back-came back

Neither is correct. "have been living" and "have lived" indicate something that starts in the past and continues into the present. What you wanted to say is (with slight additional paraphrasing): ...
G. Ann - SonarSource Team's user avatar
3 votes

I've recently read / I recently read

Grammatically both of your first sentences are correct and idiomatic. One uses the present perfect, and the other uses the simple past. There's really no difference between them. One might sound ...
Andrew's user avatar
  • 88.3k
3 votes

Present perfect and past simple

The present perfect is not restricted to “recent” events: The Smithsonian Global Volcanism Program defines a volcano as active only if it has erupted in the last 10,000 years. —...
StoneyB on hiatus's user avatar
3 votes

Who (broke / has broken) the glass?

Both should be fine, although "Who broke the glass?" would be more common, as "Who has broken the glass?" would sound unnaturally formal. Check out this canonical SE post and this user-submitted post ...
A. Galloway's user avatar
3 votes

Who (broke / has broken) the glass?

In these circumstances "Who broke the glass?" would be the more usual. As it had clearly happened recently in time, since the mother was last there, and it was reasonably clear that it must have been ...
WS2's user avatar
  • 5,125
3 votes

"Have been waiting" vs "was waiting"

In many contexts (like this) both are fine. Where have you been? I have been waiting for over an hour! Where have you been? I was waiting for over an hour! Both of these indicate an ongoing ...
Andrew's user avatar
  • 88.3k

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