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Latin grammar Latin has an inflected grammar, in which words change their form to indicate the role they're playing in a sentence. English has a little bit of inflection; Latin has a lot. For example, in English, these are all the possible forms of a verb: show, shows, showed, shown, showing. Most Latin verbs have about 150 different forms. These indicate ...


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I have some material that couuld help you. Would can be used as a modal verb or in conditionals (2st conditional -> If i could, then I would... 3rd conditional -> if i had been, than I would have...). So if you search for MODAL VERBS and CONDITIONALS, i think most of your questions about "WOULD" will be answered. Here are some images that ...


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It would be hard to give a complete list of such rules of Latin grammar being applied to English, and there is still some degree of controversy on these matters. The simplest example, however, is the rule about not ending a sentence with a preposition. This is a hang-over from when Latin grammarians were adapting practices appropriate to Latin to English ...


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This is something of a comment on the other answers, especially @benkovitz, but I wanted to add a couple of additional thoughts. As Ben Kovitz says, English grammar and Latin grammar are certainly not the same. I'd add the caveat that there are surely many cases where English and Latin grammar do accomplish the same thing in different ways. Like in general, ...


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There's not a right answer for that question. It depends on you. The more you study, read and listen and practice conversation, the more you will learn. A good habit to keep when you are learning vocabulary is to keep a word list of the words you have learned, and update it regularly. There are great sites for that, such as www.vocabulary.com. English ...


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Barrie England's answer is correct, the CEFR is a very helpful guideline but if the OP is interested in taking exams to measure his level and prove to others that his English is progressing I would say that: TOEFL is awful but IELTS is better. As I understand it, although I'm not an expert; TOEFL has one fixed format (which by the way is continually updated)...


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Link:Learner's Dictionary You've asked a very difficult question. I know because I am a native speaker of Canadian English, but I cannot tell you why. When I was a child the rules were different from the examples in the link. "Can I go to bed?" Would have meant, was I physically able to go to bed. I was corrected ad nauseum to say, "May I go to bed?" That ...


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What that means is that you are likely to pass the C2 exam, not that you have. So, no. Your only certification is C1. You could say you believe you have a C2-level of proficiency, but nothing beyond that. However, there's certainly nothing wrong with stating passed C1 Advanced with an A, and letting others interpret that how they wish.


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I shall try to answer this question, but it is so badly posed as to be nearly unintelligible. What do you want to say? (Remember that "component") may be used as a noun or an adjective. So the short answer is If "component" is being used as an adjective, adjectives have neither possessives nor plurals. If "component" is being used as a noun, both ...


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Your best resource is your child; she'll teach you. Children at this age are absorbing language in ways that are not well understood. They are too young to tell us how to do it. Your child is picking up new words all the time and pretty soon you'll start learning through her. One fear that ESL parents have (I'm not sure, perhaps you too) is that their ...


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1) Watch children’s TV shows with the English subtitles on. 2) Read for yourself books directed at 2 year olds. The ones with minimal or no plot but lots of words. Richard Scary wrote a few good ones


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An interesting topic. My view is the computer, electronic dictionaries and smart phones with large memory capacities are the optimal things for language learning. But this is just the beginning of a new way of language learning. We are far from using the possibilities of these new developments. Youtube, eg hasn't yet seen the potential of good videos for ...


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Translations are almost always approximations. Languages have contained within them all of the many subtleties that differentiate one culture from another. Languages not only differ in their sounds and word order. The people of every culture have many of their very own subconscious assumptions about how the world is ordered. This order is encoded in the ...


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That paragraph says that grammatical descriptions used to study Latin were applied to English. Native English speakers do not study actual Latin grammar. English education varies from country to country (and from state to state in the U.S.). You can search online using the word "curriculum" to see what sort of stuff gets taught. Here's an example from a ...


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The NC levels in British schools (to my knowledge) work by building up complexity in ideas using small sets of vocabulary. Tenses are worked in. The first three levels involve reporting: small statements about small things. You could whack out colours, pencil case items, instruments, sports, insert generic group of common objects here, and have people try ...


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What is the class size for which you are interviewing? I assume that the committee won’t be much more than five people. In this case I would say that your lesson should be designed for a five person classroom. A smaller class size gives you some flexibility to adapt a lesson to the relative skills of the students. To this end, I would recommend my tutoring ...


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The first step is to find the basic meaning of the sentence. Somewhere in there, there will be a subject and a finite verb; there may also be an object or complement. In your example sentence, the basic meaning is 'he helps people' (subject pronoun - verb - direct object). Almost everything else gives extra information about one of those things or about the ...


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I've never researched this, but I would be very surprised if you found that words in English that have multiple unrelated definitions -- like "trunk" the nose of an elephant versus "trunk" a large suitcase versus "trunk" the main branch of a tree -- have the SAME multiple unrelated definitions in another language. Even related definitions -- like "talk" a ...


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Learning single words is not effective. The brain doesn't understand why it should remember those single words. What you put into your brain at the front is thrown out again at the back because it is uninteresting for your brain. Read books that fascinate you and work through some text for an hour and write down the words you have looked up.. You will see ...


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