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47 votes

"Carrie has arrived at the airport for two hours." - Is this sentence grammatically correct?

It's grammatical, but it doesn't make much sense, a bit like Noam Chomsky's famous sentence, "Colorless green ideas sleep furiously." To arrive is something that happens instantaneously, not over a ...
David Richerby's user avatar
23 votes
Accepted

"My boss was furious with me and I have been fired" vs. "My boss was furious with me and I was fired"

The first thing to realise is that in most cases, whether or not to use the present perfect is a free choice: it depends on how you are choosing to relate the events to the present circumstances. If ...
Colin Fine's user avatar
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22 votes
Accepted

Shouldn't it be "HAVE been put on hold" instead of "HAD been put on hold"?

First, it can't be “have been put on hold”. It would have to be “has been put on hold”, because the subject is “the repair …”, which is singular. It is also possible to say “the repairs … have been ...
Gilles 'SO- stop being evil''s user avatar
20 votes
Accepted

"I am finished" vs "I have finished"

Depending on context they could have the same or slightly different meanings I have finished would be said after completing a task either very recently or some time in the recent past I am ...
Peter's user avatar
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18 votes

Is "I have been to Italy two years ago for 2 months" correct?

It would be fine to say I have been to Italy, but once you add the time and duration, the event becomes much more specific. I think the simple past is more appropriate: I was in [or, went to] ...
Matthew Leingang's user avatar
16 votes

"Carrie has arrived at the airport for two hours." - Is this sentence grammatically correct?

Carrie has arrived at the airport for two hours. This sentence does not work in English. To arrive is an action that is conceived of as taking place at once, not over time. So using a duration (for ...
Alan Carmack's user avatar
15 votes

"Carrie has arrived at the airport for two hours." - Is this sentence grammatically correct?

I would use the present perfect verb (the point of the exercise being use of the present perfect) "has been" Carrie has been at the airport for two hours.
John Burger's user avatar
  • 2,525
15 votes

Shouldn't it be "HAVE been put on hold" instead of "HAD been put on hold"?

One would generally expect the sentence to read: *The repair of the 300-year-old building began nearly a decade ago but HAS been put on hold because of a lack of financial support." That would ...
Ronald Sole's user avatar
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11 votes
Accepted

How can an event prove by itself?

The it in the sentence is just the dummy it. An English sentence has to have a subject, but sometimes there's no obvious subject for a sentence, so we use it to stand for the existence or nature of ...
stangdon's user avatar
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10 votes

"Carrie has arrived at the airport for two hours." - Is this sentence grammatically correct?

If you want to keep most of the words from the original sentence, I would use: Carrie has been at the airport ever since she arrived two hours ago. The original sentence's focus is on the arrival ...
jfren484's user avatar
  • 304
9 votes

"I am finished" vs "I have finished"

You could say either one, but things get more complicated when you elaborate and mention what you've finished: I have finished this task. I am finished with this task.
J.R.'s user avatar
  • 110k
8 votes

Is 'She has been taken' active or passive voice?

This construction is present perfect passive. When you talk about 'subjects' and 'objects' you must be careful that you do not confuse syntactic roles, the functions word or phrases play in a ...
StoneyB on hiatus's user avatar
8 votes

How can an event prove by itself?

There are multiple senses of the verb to prove. In the example sentence, the following form is used (from Oxford Dictionaries): prove Verb 2.1 [no object, with complement] Been seen or found ...
LMS's user avatar
  • 5,562
8 votes

Can I say "something is happened to my phone"?

You can say "something happened to my phone". That tells your listener that the thing that happened, happened in the past. Your listener doesn't know whether there is still a problem. So you'd have ...
MMacD's user avatar
  • 2,293
8 votes
Accepted

Using "when" with Present Perfect

As FumbleFingers and 1006a mention in the comments, there's nothing grammatically wrong with using the present perfect with "when". However, it imbues the question with nuance, since it often implies ...
Andrew's user avatar
  • 88.4k
8 votes

"My boss was furious with me and I have been fired" vs. "My boss was furious with me and I was fired"

Both are fine. ...and I was fired. This explains what happened in the past - you were fired. ...and I have been fired. This explains your current situation - you are in a state of having been ...
Davo's user avatar
  • 4,150
7 votes
Accepted

Is the phrase "are you come" in this sentence correct?

It's "correct" but outdated. You'd be hard pressed to find someone using it in modern English. The modern equivalent would be "have you come here". In this example, the Giant is asking the man why ...
Catija's user avatar
  • 25.4k
7 votes

"My boss was furious with me and I have been fired" vs. "My boss was furious with me and I was fired"

Can I also say "My boss was furious with me and I have been fired."? That's an error, but it's not a grammatical error, more of a style error. "My boss was furious" is simple past. "I have been fired"...
Acccumulation's user avatar
7 votes

"My boss was furious with me and I have been fired" vs. "My boss was furious with me and I was fired"

If the speaker were talking to someone soon after the firing, the "was...have been" construction would be appropriate. The "have been" verb is in the present perfect tense, which describes an action ...
Joe McMahon's user avatar
7 votes

Do these sentences mean the same: "He has been found not guilty" and "He has not been found guilty"

They do not mean the same thing! In one, the trial has concluded and the verdict given. In the other, the trial may not have even begun yet. You are correct that "not guilty" is a fixed ...
Luke Sawczak's user avatar
  • 13.1k
6 votes

"I am finished" vs "I have finished"

Both are grammatically correct. I am finished The speaker is in the state of being finished with a task. I have finished This describes the completion of the task in the very recent past. (...
Mini Bhati's user avatar
6 votes

"My boss was furious with me and I have been fired" vs. "My boss was furious with me and I was fired"

The answer depends on what language you are asking about. In English, "...have been..." is a statement about the present as well as the past. It talks not only about what happened, but also about ...
Martin Kochanski's user avatar
6 votes
Accepted

Use of "had/have been"

(1) I had been for a long walk and was feeling tired. This (1) is the past perfect construction (or tense). It indicates that the action (here the walk) started and ended in the past, and probably ...
David Siegel's user avatar
  • 41.3k
5 votes

"I have submitted the application" is it a right sentence?

I have submitted the application, and await your feedback. is correct. Present perfect tense is used, because the actions related to your application (review and decision) are in the present time ...
user3169's user avatar
  • 31.2k
5 votes

What tense to use for an event that was no longer valid?

Your analysis is correct, but there's one thing you overlooked: the present perfect cannot be used with a time adverbial which does not include the present. This is because the present perfect is a ...
StoneyB on hiatus's user avatar
4 votes

Complicated sentences in past perfect regarding hypothetical situations with reflection on the past?

Grammar is like water, in that speakers will take the path of least resistance. Things begin to become ungrammatical, or at the very least unidiomatic, when the water starts flowing upstream, as it ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 130k
4 votes

"Carrie has arrived at the airport for two hours." - Is this sentence grammatically correct?

The syntax is valid but the semantics is not. see https://english.stackexchange.com/questions/29504/syntactically-correct-semantically-incorrect-sentence Any native speaker would conclude that the ...
mt_'s user avatar
  • 41
4 votes

usage of 'having been + past participle'

Is it okay to use 'Having been+third form' as the reduction of Passive Relative Clause in Simple Past Tense in order to put more emphasis? In a word, no—because BE having been VERBPaPpl is not ...
StoneyB on hiatus's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

Why is the past simple used in "As soon as I started the car I realised..."?

If you want your verb form to convey, explicitly and unambiguously, the idea that you had the realization immediately after the car had (fully) started, and not rely solely on adverbial phrases to ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 130k
4 votes

Using "when" with Present Perfect

The most likely paraphrase of simple past: When did your brother contact you? is, On what occasion or at what time did your brother contact you? An answer might be: My brother contacted me ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 130k

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