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33

Go from [something] to [something else] can describe or define a sequence from the first something to the other something. In other words, from and to are being used in an ordinary way to indicate a starting point and an ending point. It goes from A to D. → A B C D ... goes from 1 to 3. → 1 2 3 These go to 11. → 1 2 ...


32

It is possible to buy underwear with a day printed on it as a joke or as a gentle reminder to a child (or adult) to change their pants each day. But I think Lorelai is being very sarcastic here. Emily implies that only two skirts are not enough, and Rory should be wearing a fresh skirt each day. Lorelai sarcastically says "I didn't know that there are five ...


8

This sounds like a sexual innuendo. The surrounding context makes the situation sound like a late teen female discussing a younger sibling with her mum. Given that Lorelai is shopping for clothes for her younger sibling, it is safe to assume she is either legally an adult or almost so. Lorelai's day of the week pants only go to Thursday. The literal meaning ...


5

Lorleia was poking at her mom for stating an obvious fact that there are five days in a school week. WLor: Really? Because my days-of-the-week underwear only go to Thursday. Sarcastically suggesting she thought there were only 4 days based on her set of available underwear. Emily: Is that a joke? Lor: Two skirts are fine, mom. Satisfied that ...


3

The expression "set out" has a number of definitions, but the relevant definition in this context is: If you set out a number of facts, beliefs, or arguments, you explain them in writing or speech in a clear, organized way. (Collins English dictionary)


3

Days of the week underwear are usually for school-aged children and sold seven panties in a pack (with one day of the week printed on each panty). Lorelai is sarcastically joking that she only thought there were four days in the school week because her days of the week underwear only go from Monday to Thursday. (In other words, she is pretending she didn't ...


3

Yes, it is natural, at least in U.S. English. It is, however, informal; some may say very informal. "Consult" has an implication of more than brief interaction and does not imply "need to gain consent." "Check with" implies something almost perfunctory in terms of time, but frequently implies "need to gain assent." Yes, Bobby may stay for dinner if he ...


3

I think any native speaker would understand the intent of this sentence, but I can't say that I've ever heard this used in real life. I have heard some quite similar constructs, that are visually very similar to your example, such as: "... but we settled for a red one." "... but we ended up with a red one." "...but we stopped looking after we found a red ...


2

According to that dictionary, yes, pass on can have directly contradictory meanings. I don't believe I have ever met that usage, and I'm not sure I would have interpreted it as given. I would also not expect pass on = decline for a committee, because to my ear that use is rather colloquial, and I would expect a more formal expression when talking about a ...


1

There is a subtle difference, although in the examples you cite, there is really no difference in meaning: The old man gave all his money to the people in need. The old man gave away all his money to the people in need. Usually "give away" means that you give someone something that is yours - for example, you would not usually say this about a gift ...


1

I do not disagree at all with Mike's answer, and in fact have voted it up, but U.S. speakers, particularly in informal contexts, frequently use ellipsis, meaning that they drop one or more words in the expectation that they will be understood. We were offered cars in many colors, but we stopped considering colors at red gets shortened to We were ...


1

The use of down implies a physical activity, while omitting it implies a result or activity that's somewhat removed from the physical (deleting something). ✔ I am going to wipe the computer's memory. ✘ I am going to wipe down the computer's memory. In this example, it doesn't make any sense to use wipe down with computer memory, because that's not ...


1

It's a recommendation that you not buy the printed book now, but wait for the audiobook. The closest adaptation of the dictionary entries that make sense in this statement are: Refuse to accept reading the book now for a the expected release of the audiobook. Withstand the desire to read the print book now, considering the audiobook will be released soon. ...


1

Happen to do something has a few meanings. You know to do something by chance: I happen to have some money in my pocket. (I even didn't plan it) I happened to meet an old friend in town. (I met him by chance) In spoken English, the phrase can be used for asking something politely: Do you happen to be a teacher? Do you happen to have an extra ...


1

Show up is not used correctly in this case. This expression is used when you go somewhere unexpectedly, you are meeting someone, or you are late at a destination, to mention a few. It would be better to say "How are you going to show up to your mum's place (or wherever you are going) looking like that?", or "how are you going to meet your mum looking like ...


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