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I'm going to give the phone to Kate. I don't use it anyway. I'm going to give the phone away to Kate. I don't use it anyway. "give" needs a direct and and indirect object. I'm going to give to Kate. (incorrect) I'm going to give the phone. (incorrect) "give away" only needs a direct object. I'm going to give the phone away. (correct) I ...


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Many core English words words (the short ones derived from Norse or German) have multiple meanings... According to the Cambridge Dictionary, the word take has fifteen meanings as a verb, one of which is to move something or someone from one place to another Similarly, off has multiple meanings, one of which is away from So it's not unreasonable for take ...


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Unfortunately, no, there isn’t, at least in a useful way. The most important words to learn are the oldest, shortest and most often used, which means they have also evolved the most over time and may have multiple meanings, irregular (often vestigial) forms, strange idioms, etc. Newer, longer words tend to be more regular simply due to less use, but that ...


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“Fly” usually means to travel on a passenger plane, but in very limited contexts (probably not this one) it can refer to driving so fast that it feels like flying—or that any bump in the road might cause your car to (briefly) become airborne. In the context of travel, the words “down”, “up” or “over” can each substitute for either “here” or “there”, with the ...


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No, there is absolutely not a formulaic way to do this, any more than there is a formulaic way to know how to spell an English word you have heard but not seen written. As with spelling, there are some patterns, which can help you learn, and may sometimes let you guess the answer; but your guesses will sometimes be wrong.


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I would suggest that you give away something that already belongs to you. Give on its own could refer to something you have just bought as a present for someone.


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I've mostly heard the first 2 words with "it" in the middle: "He's good, but I don't know if he can carry it off." "She was able to carry it off with alacrity". I've mostly heard "carry off" in the context of removing something -- "He was playing hard and intended to carry off the prize." I've heard carry and ...


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Without context, it is impossible to be 100% sure what is meant, but 99.9% of the time it means to make a telephone call to your place of employment. One reason that I cannot be completely positive is that it looks as though the speaker is not a native English speaker because First thing first is not idiomatic. Why in the world would someone who has ...


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I will be careful here...the speaker is using terrible english. This does not mean her point is wrong. But this is the worst of slang. Its meaningless. You can only understand it in context.


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To "turn someone out" in police/underworld/deviant slang can mean to make that person change roles or loyalties in a significant and relevant way. Gay people use it to discuss seducing someone formerly identifying as straight, and in a police context, including this one, to "turn out" a criminal is to recruit that person as a police ...


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to go to something If you are discussing a topic with someone and use the phrase: X goes to something, It means: to show or reveal or explain something about a situation. It is often used by people like talk show hosts or TV presenters. And yes, it is perfectly usable. I have no idea when it started being used.


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