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56

Wiktionary defines the expression plug out as Irish: (Ireland, transitive, colloquial) To unplug; to remove (an electrical device) from its socket. From The Daily Edge : 13 words you'll never hear outside of Ireland... Another uniquely Irish phrase is 'to plug out' as in ' plug out the telly'.


42

It is not redundant but unidiomatic. We ordinarily speak of picking fruit or berries, without up, from the trees or bushes on which they grow; we use pick up only if they have been spilled (that is, we pick them up off the floor or other surface they have been spilled on) or if we are stop briefly at a shop or stand to obtain them.


38

stop by to visit someone briefly So stop by my desk means come over to my workplace. The term stop by has an undertone of "when you are passing place X, stop for a moment". So it typically refers to a casual visit or meeting as opposed to a fixed date or pre-arranged meeting.


36

If you're saying that you are going to actually collect flowers or berries, "up" is not only redundant, it's outright wrong. We don't "pick up" things when we gather them, we "pick" them. I spent the afternoon picking flowers in the field around my house. I picked these berries this morning. Now, you can "pick up" stuff... but it means to get them ...


34

In America, we use the term "unplug", not "plug out"


27

In formal English, adding the hyphen to log in makes your sample sentence grammatically incorrect. The hyphen has the effect of turning the phrasal verb into an adjective or a noun. For example, these sentences are valid: Click here to go to the log-in page. Upon successful log-in, you will be redirected to the subscription page. This rule mostly ...


25

The other answers do an excellent job explaining too adjective to infinitive, so I won't address that. I'll try to explain a different aspect of this, which might be what you're finding so surprising: specifically, how it could possibly be that removing an adverb could render a sentence ungrammatical? As you said, removing "slowly" from "He slowly walked ...


25

Here in South Africa, we say "plug out" too. I am not sure if this is based on the historical European influence, or that in Afrikaans "uit prop" translates to "plug out" really... In Afrikaans, the words make sense - but I can see how it gets a little non-descriptive in English. It sounds like "rock out" (even though not really great form in my opinion ...


23

It normally means "her", but often in terms of an inanimate object like a car or a boat. I guess the quote is treating your brain as the 'inanimate object', just stretching the metaphor a bit. To "patch something up" is to make running repairs, rather than take it to the garage/dry dock/... doctor ;) & get your car/boat/brain back into working order ...


22

I was born in Melbourne but bred in Sydney No. "Born and bred" is a set phrase, and when used separately its meaning changes. As a standalone word, "bred" is more suitable for use in regards to cattle or other animals. "Born and bred" is tied together so tightly that you can use it as an attributive adjective: She was a born and bred Melbourner. What ...


22

It is a contraction of her, found in some regional accents. Dropping h's is a feature of a few different regional accents and dialects, and while people who speak that way will endeavor to spell words correctly when writing, authors will sometimes try and imitate the way a person speaks when writing dialogue so that the reader can imagine their accent, ...


20

oxforddictionaries.com has this as the first definition of tap (n): A device by which a flow of liquid or gas from a pipe or container can be controlled. and for the verb, Draw liquid through the tap or spout of (a cask, barrel, or other container) When you tap a barrel of beer, you can get the beer out of it. When you tap a certain kind of maple ...


19

To [verb] something up is to apply the qualities of the verb to the object of the action. Vague that up is not a common phrase (actually, I've never heard it used before) but the meaning here is rather clear if you take into account the context. Giles made an extremely vague statement, and Buffy is pointing out this fact by sarcastically requesting that he ...


19

I work in north eastern Ohio, in a community of Amish people, where the first language is Dutch (not European Dutch - this would be Pennsylvania Dutch, or a regional dialect thereof). Here, I never hear native dutch speakers say "unplug." It's always "plug out." There are relatively few idioms that are unique to this area, but this is one of those that ...


18

This is a very common mistake! So, don't worry. Here is the cure. Ask yourself which one makes more sense: "look forward to it" or "look forward to do it"? Chances are you know that "look forward to it" sounds more natural, because you've seen or you've heard others use it that way before. And, yes, with look forward to, you need hearing from you (NOT hear ...


17

They both mean the same thing. You can say "Put down the [something]" or "Put the [something] down". Using old fashioned, wired, phones, you terminate a call by replacing the receiver in its cradle ("putting it down"). On a modern mobile or cordless phone, you have to to press a button or touch a place on the screen. For either of these actions, people can ...


16

They're both fine, and they mean the same thing. The particle down can appear before or after the object the volume: 1a. I don't know how to turn the volume down. ​1b. I don't know how to turn down the volume. However, if the object is an unstressed personal pronoun, down has to come at the end: 2a. I don't know how to turn it down. 2b. *I don'...


15

The Free Dictionary, in its article for to blow has the following definitions: blow away Slang 2. To defeat decisively. 3. To affect intensely; overwhelm: That concert blew me away. I guess, it's exactly the meaning you need.


15

First, the phrasal verb is indeed take off, which means: take off (phrasal verb) To leave the ground and begin flight; to ascend into the air Second, you can use a preposition after a phrasal verb: The plane took off from the runway. Third, we need to be careful about omitting the prepositions, because sometimes phrasal verbs can mean different ...


15

You need to consider 'take over' and 'on' separately. The phrasal verb 'take over' has its normal meaning, and (I suspect) the preposition 'on' here is used idiomatically/conversationally to denote assignment to a task or role, and, as you suggest, might be omitted in more formal speech. Consider a random example I just made up: I am head chef in a ...


14

NOTE: ✲ at the head of an utterance marks it as unaccceptable in Standard English. There are, broadly, three types of these “multi-word verbs”, also called “phrasal verbs” or “compound verbs”. In what follows I’m only going to address the ones which are likely to give you trouble, transitive verb+preposition compounds which take a direct object The first ...


14

The construction in question is: too adjective to verb Examples: I'm too tired to drive I'm too bored to continue I'm too dizzy to stand The "too" here is crucial -- it's saying you're tired to such an extent that you cannot drive. Contrast this with: almost too tired to drive In this case, you're still indicating that you're tired, but not ...


14

Flexible word order The difference is only that the words are in a different order. The grammar is the same. English actually has somewhat flexible word order, though we rarely exploit this in everyday conversation or prose. The normal word order in English is SVO: subject-verb-object. That's the order of “John came along.” (There’s no object in that ...


14

In the senses that you give above, we use pull over more often to indicate a brief pause while travelling: to look at a map, to let others pass in front, in response to a police car's red light, etc. We can also pull over without stopping, while to park implies stopping. We use park more often to indicate a longer stop at a destination. We can say Let's ...


14

to shut something down simply means to make something nonoperational. When you shut your computer down, you bring it into a nonoperational state. If authorities shut a business down (by the way, another term that's used to refer to a company or business in English is operation), they legally close it down thereby making it nonoperational. This idiom can ...


14

The actual meaning is the same, but in normal conversation I would be more likely to say "put the phone down", but if I lost patience with you because you are not listening this would turn to "Put Down The Phone".


13

Here's an example of the type of computer this is probably talking about: As you can see, the computer inputs are a series of toggle switches. So, while we now "type in" information, at that point, you'd have to "toggle in" information.


13

Cambridge dictionary gives the best and, to me, most precise definition of stop by: to ​visit someone for a ​short ​time, usually on the way to another ​place So to stop by someone's desk has the idea of make a stop at my desk on your way to the exit, break room, restroom, etc.


12

Yes you may. However, it is conventional to hyphenate the phrase: Remove old, commented-out code. This is not strictly required, and you will often see the hyphen omitted; but it is a courtesy to the reader, to make the syntax clearer.


12

These are both correct. I would add, though, that I'm looking forward to our meeting sounds (to me, at least) more conversational (and a bit more genuine), whereas I look forward to our meeting is a bit more formal/polite. I would expect to find the I'm looking form in spoken language, and the I look form in writing (likely at the end of an email confirming ...


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