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4

There are many ways to express this idea in common English, but unfortunately your example is not one of them. Consider as alternatives: process (without the "up"), absorb, mull things over, think things over/through, let the gears turn, reflect (or pause to reflect), chew on the idea, contemplate, soak up (as suggested by @Bee), and probably many more. ...


3

That's a common phrase in football. The meaning might not be obvious at first, but once you understand it it's actually quite a literal description. It describes a type of pass typically played towards a team mate who is already running. Instead of being passed directly towards the player's feet, the ball is passed into empty space ahead of the player, at ...


3

That is not a phrasal verb. It is a passive construction. "be + past-particple". "Seen" is the past particple of "see". It means "One sees Saturn in Leo", (Here "one" is the pronoun, meaning "someone") With a sentence like this, it is natural to use the passive, since the identity of the subject isn't known and isn't important.


2

I think the phrase you might be looking for is "soak up". Generally I think this would only ever be used metaphorically so it might be worth clarifying: I will leave her alone for now so that she can soak up the information. Do let me know if that's not the what you were looking for!


1

You beat someone up. You beat someone up badly. You would not say to someone: Get out of here, or you will get beaten (up) badly [by me]. You would say: Get out of here, or I will beat you up! That is what you tell someone else: He got badly beaten (up) by those guys.


1

Figured out means "understood" or "solved", as you noted. I think the problem here is with "it" or "it all". "He's got it all figured out" would, in general, means "he's got life solved" and would imply that the person has worked out a successful way of living. In this context, it would go beyond merely making a lot of money (because that was explicitly ...


1

You can still use to come up, there's nothing inherently one-sided to this phrasal verb that the first person can only be the object or something. When everybody was dancing, I came up to her and after greetings started talking to her and fortunately we made quick friends. (note that I have changed 'were' to 'was'; 'everybody' is singular even though it ...


1

The words "coming up" are a commonly used set phrase, if not quite an idiom. In the sense used in the question, they mostly indicate that someone is coming to a higher floor, particularly to an apartment from street level. Buzz the door open because I'm coming up. On the other hand, "I'm coming" in a comparable sense means merely that the person is on ...


1

Context is very important in English, so it yes, the normal meaning of 'putting up a picture' would be 'on a wall' but for a web developer, it would be perfectly valid to use exactly the same phrase for adding to a website. A very similar example with a rather different meaning would be 'putting up with a picture' which would generally mean that a picture ...


1

The term draw in a larger sense means simply to move something by pulling on it. One common sense of the phrase came from pulling on the reins of a horse or team of horses to cause them to stop. Now, "draw up" has expanded to mean bringing any vehicle to a stop. From its original meaning, also, "draw up" can also convey the sense of pulling something more ...


1

In the UK, back off is generally used to mean stay out of this and is generally seen as aggressive: "You better back off or else." If we're talking politics or in polite conversation we'd use step down or back out instead: The PM has said she will step down after the next election. You'd better not back out of your promise to do all the planning for the ...


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