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56

Wiktionary defines the expression plug out as Irish: (Ireland, transitive, colloquial) To unplug; to remove (an electrical device) from its socket. From The Daily Edge : 13 words you'll never hear outside of Ireland... Another uniquely Irish phrase is 'to plug out' as in ' plug out the telly'.


34

In America, we use the term "unplug", not "plug out"


25

Here in South Africa, we say "plug out" too. I am not sure if this is based on the historical European influence, or that in Afrikaans "uit prop" translates to "plug out" really... In Afrikaans, the words make sense - but I can see how it gets a little non-descriptive in English. It sounds like "rock out" (even though not really great form in my opinion ...


23

It normally means "her", but often in terms of an inanimate object like a car or a boat. I guess the quote is treating your brain as the 'inanimate object', just stretching the metaphor a bit. To "patch something up" is to make running repairs, rather than take it to the garage/dry dock/... doctor ;) & get your car/boat/brain back into working order ...


22

It is a contraction of her, found in some regional accents. Dropping h's is a feature of a few different regional accents and dialects, and while people who speak that way will endeavor to spell words correctly when writing, authors will sometimes try and imitate the way a person speaks when writing dialogue so that the reader can imagine their accent, ...


19

I work in north eastern Ohio, in a community of Amish people, where the first language is Dutch (not European Dutch - this would be Pennsylvania Dutch, or a regional dialect thereof). Here, I never hear native dutch speakers say "unplug." It's always "plug out." There are relatively few idioms that are unique to this area, but this is one of those that ...


17

They both mean the same thing. You can say "Put down the [something]" or "Put the [something] down". Using old fashioned, wired, phones, you terminate a call by replacing the receiver in its cradle ("putting it down"). On a modern mobile or cordless phone, you have to to press a button or touch a place on the screen. For either of these actions, people can ...


15

You need to consider 'take over' and 'on' separately. The phrasal verb 'take over' has its normal meaning, and (I suspect) the preposition 'on' here is used idiomatically/conversationally to denote assignment to a task or role, and, as you suggest, might be omitted in more formal speech. Consider a random example I just made up: I am head chef in a ...


14

The actual meaning is the same, but in normal conversation I would be more likely to say "put the phone down", but if I lost patience with you because you are not listening this would turn to "Put Down The Phone".


12

I am from a community in New York speaking English and Yiddish and I can definitely hear myself say "plug out". I believe this happens because we tend to express things in English the same way we would in express it in Yiddish. There are many more examples where we do it. Yiddish is also somewhat derived from German.


10

The preposition on is also used with the accounts/customers of a business, such as a PR firm or a law firm: Who should we put as lead on the Acme Widgets account? And the account/customer can be referred to by name: Who should we put as lead on Acme Widgets? -- Let's put Jim on that account. We can't. Jim's taking over on Spacely Sprockets. That ...


9

To have something locked in it means that it's definite and fixed, so that you have no worries it will go away. The phrase most commonly appears in things like negotiations or contracts, where you might lock in certain conditions as part of the deal. For example a manufacturer might lock in a vendor of one of their key components, to ensure a steady supply....


9

I came across this phrasing in a Supermicro server's IPMI Virtual Media interface. It looks like this: The plug in/out buttons could easily say "connect/disconnect" and have exactly the same meaning. Company is based in California, USA, but I do not know where their IPMI interface coders are located.


7

To be "locked in" there means to be well-established as a regular routine or regimen. Develop a nutritious diet and "stick to it", that is, do not deviate from it or lapse into the earlier bad eating habits.


6

In idiomatic English, to "look up" a female person's skirt is to deliberately direct the gaze so that areas of the wearer's anatomy, underwear, etc, that are normally hidden by the skirt, can be seen. To do this is a serious breach of good manners and privacy, and may be deemed indecent behaviour or sexual harassment. An equally deplored act is to "look down"...


5

This looks like dialect. The book notes that the twins were failures at school, and "had less grammar than any of their poor neighbours". For the highlighted part, I read "laying out" to mean "hiding" but I get this almost entirely from the context: The boys have been expelled from University, and they are avoiding their mother. Compare with "laying low". ...


5

"Filling up" a form was common in British English before about 1920. Still common in Indian English, but very obsolete elsewhere. British "fill in" and American "fill out" are common these days. British telegraph form (1890)


4

The transcript is not correct. It should be: So this idea that the Islamic empire wasn't always a califate —for much of its history, it was just an empire— is really very important because it gets to how not different ways of organizing people are, when it comes to, like, "us" and "them". gets to is being used to mean something like "brings us to ...


4

I don't think there's any difference between the two phrases. Perhaps some people think they're different but, if you want to communicate clearly, you shouldn't rely on people picking up such subtle differences.


4

This is sense 2 from the Merriam-Webster definition: to take (something) from the place where it is stored so that it can be used : to break out This is extended metaphorically to opening a programme on a computer. To "bust out the calculator" is to take the calculator program 'from' where it is stored so it can be used - that is, the software in ...


4

The two sentences do not mean exactly the same thing, no. Those positional prepositions mean two different things; you get "out of" something if you are no longer inside of it, and you are "away from" something if you are no longer near to it. In the sense of helping someone "get away" (or make a "getaway") it still means distance. If the prisoners dug a ...


4

There are many ways to express this idea in common English, but unfortunately your example is not one of them. Consider as alternatives: process (without the "up"), absorb, mull things over, think things over/through, let the gears turn, reflect (or pause to reflect), chew on the idea, contemplate, soak up (as suggested by @Bee), and probably many more. ...


3

They're not interchangeable. To go out implies somewhere relatively close, that you're going to return from sooner rather than later. You can go out to work, out to a bar, restaurant or club. You would more likely go away to a further destination. You could go away to Paris, London or Rome - even if just for the day, you wouldn't say 'go out to Rome'... ...


3

In your example, you would use "to" to show transformation Change that code to this code. Change that Python code to this R code. but as usual it depends what you want to say. If you wanted to show replacement, you might use Exchange that (piece) of code with this (piece) of code. If you want to say how to make a change happen (by way of), you ...


3

The word withdraw comes from Middle English and still means to draw or take back, like if you withdraw your hand when you're done holding hands with someone. A newer definition of withdraw is to stay away from others or stop participating in something. withdraw into oneself means to become introverted or to concern oneself with one's inner thoughts. I ...


3

It means to remain a loyal ally. To stand (figuratively) shoulder to shoulder, confronting some form of opposition.


3

You’re right: “Look it up in the dictionary” would be preferred unless the meaning of the sentence is “Look up the foreign dictionary in the library” or something like that. “Look up the dictionary” gets the meaning across, but it’s sloppy English.


3

As you said, the phrasal verb "check out" has two definitions. When used to mean "sign out" (as in the context of hotels), the verb is transitive or reflexive, taking a direct object that is the thing or person actually going "out". For example, "book" is the direct object in "I checked out a book from the library". If the direct object is not an explicit ...


3

Both are fine. Difficulties can be idiomatically sorted out, solved or resolved (and a great many other things). As The Free Dictionary explains, to sort out can mean: To understand or resolve a problem or conflict. A noun can be used between "sort" and "out." They brought in the head of human resources to sort the issue out. I've spent nearly an hour on ...


3

They're equally correct and natural. The difference between them is the subtle nuance of how much responsibility is attributed to her. In the first one, "it took her two hours to do X", it sounds as though she's directly responsible for the amount of time that passed. Here's a way to use that nuance for irony, in a case where the amount of time is your ...


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