4 votes
Accepted

Complex plane "deprived from" or "deprived of" closed disk?

We don't usually say "deprived from". It is correct to say "deprived of", but in most contexts your phrase would require at least one determiner. For example: We end up with a ...
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3 votes
Accepted

What is the difference between "He made it through the crowd to me" and "He made his way through the crowd to me" in this context?

That is correct. To make it to a place is to succeed in reaching that place, with the implication that the journey may have been difficult.
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3 votes

I didn't played for a long time or I haven't play for a long time

We don't speak of playing archery, but doing or taking part in it. You play sports that take the form of games, like tennis, football or cricket. You could answer your friend I haven't done archery ...
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2 votes

Which tense is more apposite here?

"Creatures" is plural, so "was" cannot be used in the sentence. Therefore the answer is B. It means that no creatures such as vampires were found from the past all the way to the ...
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  • 5,569
2 votes
Accepted

Thank you very much for your help. / Thank you very much for the help

I don't see any grammar reason for the first sentence being more common, simply we are making the thanks more personal. We thank for the help that you have offered (ie "your help") not just ...
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2 votes
Accepted

fall silent vs. remain silent

The explanation that you received doesn't make sense to me. Falling silent is going from a state of not being silent to a state of being silent. Remaining silent is what is sounds like - i.e., ...
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  • 2,254
2 votes

Sign v. sign off

sign off: to announce the end of something (such as a message or broadcast) Source sign: write one's name on (a letter, card, document, etc.) to identify oneself as the writer or sender Source &...
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2 votes
Accepted

Do you call a/the taxi or "call in a taxi/the taxi when you want a taxi pick you up and take somewhere?

As a speaker of AmE (Specifically northeastern US), I would use and most often expect to hear "call a taxi" when the speaker means to summon a taxi by telephone or text. If the speaker means ...
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1 vote

What is the difference between "He made it through the crowd to me" and "He made his way through the crowd to me" in this context?

To 'make it' somewhere is to achieve an arrival at that place in spite of possible or actual difficulty or obstacles, or e.g. when there is a deadline - He made it to me through the busy crowd, he ...
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1 vote

Which tense is more apposite here?

There are two issues here: tense and number. The preceding clause ("that no such creatures as vampires have been seen") is in the present perfect tense, and, as Kate Bunting notes in a ...
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1 vote
Accepted

"In presupposing" or "in that they presuppose"?

Both options are grammatically correct and idiomatic. Their meaning is close to the same. The only difference is where they place the emphasis: The theories are unique in that they presuppose XYZ ...
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