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4 votes
Accepted

Do you really distinguish the difference between "the shirt's rumpled" and "the shirt's wrinkled" and "the shirt's creased"?

You forgot crumpled! My take on it: I would call a garment wrinkled if it hadn't been ironed after being washed - full of small creases. I would call it creased if it had been placed between other ...
Kate Bunting's user avatar
  • 57.1k
4 votes

Is "let loose" better than "let slip", when it comes to "dogs"?

In the answers to your previous question it was indicated that the phrase "let slip the dogs of war" is quoted directly from Shakespeare's Julius Caesar. Changing it would weaken the ...
Spehro Pefhany's user avatar
3 votes

If so, I **will give/ going to give/ am giving** you 5 months

There's a missing am for the second one, and 's' for month. Edit I will give/ [am] going to give/ am giving you [five additional] month[s] to finish this project. All three versions are fine. I ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
2 votes

Do you really distinguish the difference between "the shirt's rumpled" and "the shirt's wrinkled" and "the shirt's creased"?

First, no, creases aren’t necessarily intentional. To call something creased often conveys that the thing bears a single crease. And creases are sharper, more pronounced than are wrinkles. Also, the ...
Paul Tanenbaum's user avatar
1 vote
Accepted

Should I use "a test" or "the test"?

In the specific situation probably "Have you booked your test?" Otherwise, a specific instance of the test is "the test", one, undetermined test is "a test" You will ...
James K's user avatar
  • 226k
1 vote
Accepted

Is it correct to say "the baby can walk 4 steps today" or "the baby can take 4 steps today"?

When reporting the ambulatory progress of a toddler it is idiomatic to say The baby took her first steps today. The baby took four steps today. The baby walked across the room today. "walked ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 130k
1 vote
Accepted

Is it correct to say "don't eat walking around" or "don't walk around eating"?

Clarity This is clearer: Don't walk around while you are eating. This is even clearer: Sit down and stay in one place while you are eating. It's usually clearer to ask for what you want than to ...
Ben Kovitz's user avatar
  • 27.6k
1 vote

Is it correct to say "don't eat walking around" or "don't walk around eating"?

Without while connecting your two clauses, your sentences sound like the following, where the two actions are integral to each other, not simply being done at the same time. The potential buyer ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 130k

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