45 votes
Accepted

Do you say "my car is high on fuel" as a counterpart of "my car is low on fuel"?

No, "high on fuel" is not an idiomatic opposite for "low on fuel". An idiomatic opposite would be, "my tank is nearly full." While high can be the opposite of low, it's ...
Juhasz's user avatar
  • 9,794
35 votes
Accepted

Does "I slept in" imply I did it on purpose or by accident?

slept in means slept late intentionally. overslept means woke up late, unintentionally. P.S. I'm a native speaker of American English and it's possible other dialects of English might use this ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 124k
31 votes
Accepted

Does the phrase "Tom has been seeing Mary for a while" always imply they have a romantic relationship?

Without any context, the sentence "Tom has been seeing Mary for a while" would strongly imply that they had a romantic relationship. In the dictionary entry that you cite, the only example ...
MarcInManhattan's user avatar
27 votes

Does "I slept in" imply I did it on purpose or by accident?

The dictionaries all agree that to sleep in is to stay in bed longer than usual - but none I can find indicate whether or not that's intentional. My own personal experience as a UK native differs from ...
DoneWithThis.'s user avatar
16 votes
Accepted

Word/phrase for straight-lined

streamline From Merriam-Webster: streamline verb 3 b : to make simpler or more efficient a system that streamlines the process This is a standard and very common verb in the business world that ...
gotube's user avatar
  • 49.6k
13 votes

Can I say "graphic design is my passion so you are"?

With the warning that it is slightly rude (but this might be the joke). You need to invert the subject and verb in the second clause Graphic design is my passion, and so are you. Inversion is ...
James K's user avatar
  • 218k
12 votes

Does the phrase "Tom has been seeing Mary for a while" always imply they have a romantic relationship?

Depending on context "seeing" could be in a professional capacity i.e. Mary is a psychiatrist, doctor, hairdresser, personal trainer, etc. However, lacking additional context, I would assume ...
colintd's user avatar
  • 229
12 votes

In which situations do we say "Bob flirts with Mary"?

It can be used in all of the above. It doesn't rule out any of those three, or imply a particular one of those three. However, the word "flirt" has the connotation of something light; that ...
BigMistake's user avatar
  • 1,122
11 votes

Do you say "my car is high on fuel" as a counterpart of "my car is low on fuel"?

As you know, the phrase "we're low on fuel" essentially means "the amount of fuel we have is less than we would like it to be" or "it would be better if we had more fuel."...
Tanner Swett's user avatar
  • 5,932
11 votes
Accepted

What are rollers that are sat one after one called?

A calender is a series of rollers used to process paper, rubber, or other materials that form thin sheets. The verb to calender refers to the process of passing through a calender. (Not to be confused ...
Stuart F's user avatar
  • 2,374
10 votes

When do we say "I cycle to work", "I bike to work" and "I ride a bike to work"?

american-english I suspect there are differences depending on what side of the Atlantic you're on, but for me, a veteran cyclist from Canada, all three of your sentences are correct and natural to ...
gotube's user avatar
  • 49.6k
9 votes

Do we say "she is sitting on the shore of the pond" or "the bank of the pond"?

The words have different connotations. A "bank" suggests a fairly steeply sloping piece of land, that is covered with grass or other vegetation. It normally remains above the waterline, ...
James K's user avatar
  • 218k
8 votes

Word/phrase for straight-lined

Straightened out is a possibity, depending on context and precise meaning.
Paul Tanenbaum's user avatar
7 votes

Do we say "She looks prettier with her naked face" or "She looks prettier with her bare face"?

The answers and comments saying that "barefaced" can't mean "without makeup" are incorrect. It may not be common in their personal varieties on English, but it definitely is one ...
curiousdannii's user avatar
7 votes

When do we say "I cycle to work", "I bike to work" and "I ride a bike to work"?

There may well be differences between American and British English, or between sub-regions in either. Where I live -- Michigan, USA -- we would typically say, "I ride a bicycle to work." If ...
Jay's user avatar
  • 65.6k
7 votes
Accepted

When do we say "I cycle to work", "I bike to work" and "I ride a bike to work"?

british-english "Cycle to work" seems the most likely. "Bike to work" could mean bicycle or motorbike. "Ride a bicycle to work" is exactly the same meaning as "...
James K's user avatar
  • 218k
7 votes

In which situations do we say "Bob flirts with Mary"?

Ditto @gotube when he says that flirting is an action and not an intention. Flirting means making casual romantic advances. Like telling someone that you think they are attractive, laughing at their ...
Jay's user avatar
  • 65.6k
7 votes

Do you say "my car is high on fuel" as a counterpart of "my car is low on fuel"?

If you want to use a similar phrasing, you could say you are "good on fuel"- this doesn't mean necessarily that you have a lot, but that you have enough. Good - adjective h (informal) : ...
Edward's user avatar
  • 171
6 votes

Does the phrase "Tom has been seeing Mary for a while" always imply they have a romantic relationship?

Yes, "seeing" means "having a romantic relationship with". Well, unless the context calls for it to be taken literally. Like, "Once he got new glasses, Tom could see Mary.&...
Jay's user avatar
  • 65.6k
6 votes

Can I say "graphic design is my passion so you are"?

Given the context that this is supposed to be written on a humorous mug for your boyfriend, I think the best way to say this would be: Graphic design is my passion... and so are you! It retains the ...
David Maness's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

When do we say "I change the bed" and "I change the bedding"?

"Change the bed" is just an idiomatic way of saying "change the bedding" (the sheets, the pillow covers, duvet covers etc). A similar example is how "change the baby" is ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 101k
4 votes

Do we say "I will tattle on you to the teacher"?

It's definitely possible for an individual to disapprove of their own past actions. There's no restriction on using I or we with tattle. A person can even disapprove of their own present or future ...
Jack O'Flaherty's user avatar
4 votes

In which situations do we say "Bob flirts with Mary"?

Flirting is the act of making romantic advances; this is true no matter the intent behind those advances. However, these advances are "not meant to be taken seriously" in the sense that ...
DotCounter's user avatar
  • 1,020
4 votes
Accepted

Is it correct to say "tell me the location I need to go to to get the document"?

You need both "to"s. But it does sound a little odd, doesn't it? You could simplify it as "Tell me where I need to go to get the document." But if you kept the original form, the ...
Andy Bonner's user avatar
  • 13.4k
4 votes
Accepted

Are "the prisoner broke free from the cell/ the policeman" and "the prisoner broke away from the cell/ the policeman" the same?

Someone can "break free" or "break away" from a human grip or hold. The prisoner broke free from the guards who were escorting him. The prisoner broke away from the guards who ...
TimR on some device's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Couldn't have cared less vs couldn't care less in context

Couldn’t care less is used for the present. “It’s raining, but I couldn’t care less.” It means, roughly, it wouldn’t be possible for me to care less. That’s just how the idiom works. Thus, for the ...
Paul Tanenbaum's user avatar
3 votes

In which situations do we say "Bob flirts with Mary"?

Flirting is an action only, not an intention or desire, so 1 and 2 are not examples of flirting because they aren't even actions. Bob may want some kind of relationship with Mary, but do nothing at ...
gotube's user avatar
  • 49.6k
3 votes

In which situations do we say "Bob flirts with Mary"?

Strictly speaking, flirt describes situation 3. (I would use Bob behaves towards Mary rather than says to.) It definitely doesn't mean situation 1; it implies that you don't have real romantic ...
Kate Bunting's user avatar
  • 54.7k
3 votes

Is it correct to say "Bob was at home watching TV. Mike was at the shopping center. After playing there for 30 minutes, Mike went/came to Bob"?

I like that you have a basic understanding of the whole who was where at what time, from whose viewpoint; which indicates "direction". That's a tough one to grasp. I'd say, for your third ...
DoneWithThis.'s user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Does "I went to school at 7 am" mean I started going to school at 7 am or I arrived school at 7 am?

It means to you what it means to a native English speaker. We'd need clarity. We can specify by saying things like: I left for school at 8am I got to school at 9pm There are occasions where it might ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 101k

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