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to sign up means to put your name on a list to be used by whomever is managing the course. Most courses require some kind of signing up. One can sign up by adding one's name to a list on a bulletin board, or on a clipboard or electronically or by (in an institution) telling the admin person you want to take the class. You sign up for a class that you want ...


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The answer comes down to two things: first, is it a noun or a verb phrase? That is, a thing, or a command? (Both "research" and "estimate" could be nouns or verbs.) It sounds like you're treating it as a thing. Next, is it some research, or is it an estimate? You say it's an estimate, which means "research" is modifying "...


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This really depends on whether there is an acceptance process or not. To sign up means to formally state your wish to join the class. To join means to actually start attending lessons. If acceptance is automatic, then you can probably use these terms interchangeably. However, acceptance may not be automatic. Maybe it's an advanced class that requires an ...


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In your case, if attending the class requires registration or similar enrollment process, then use I signed up for a dance class. I joined a dance class sounds more abstract. It doesn't tell anything about the class, whether it requires registration or enrollment process.


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I've only ever encountered "Someone of the opposite gender" so that's what I would use. I think "Someone from the opposite gender" is perfectly understandable and seems like the same meaning, but I have never heard a native speaker say it exactly that way.


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I would say on the stick. Whatever the mechanics of attaching it, the balloon ends up mounted on the end of the stick.


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I think it is correct to say "The Lego got broken apart." You could also say "The Lego broke apart." Either way is correct. As suggested in the comments, it is also correct to say "The Lego came apart." I agree that "separated" may be too a big word for a young child.


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Not natural. "Let's introduce ourselves" is okay. "... to each other" is rather redundant, but not really wrong. But I wouldn't feel the need to say anything at all. It depends a little on the students, and their ages and English abilities and the reason you want them to introduce themselves. But I'd probably just introduce myself, ...


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I think thrive in something like in a habitat. E.g. Flamingos thrive in habitats like the lake. Thrive on, however, is taking advantage of someone’s ability to do something. E.g. Flamingos thrive on interactions with one another.


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You are right that "in the street" literally means being in the road when it refers to a person or any other thing that perhaps shouldn't be there. Strangely, when it's a car or another vehicle, that car is "on the street / road". "On the street" can mean a number of things. For example, a house or other building on a street ...


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Your definitions are mostly correct but there is more to say. As you state fall off implies you were on something and then you fell so that you were no longer on it. You fall off a ladder for instance. Fall out implies being in something and then falling so you were no longer inside. So you might fall out of the door. Note that it also has figurative uses, ...


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You can be allowed or permitted to do something, but neither of these logically fits your sentence. If the prize(s) are for a competition that people have to pay to enter, you wouldn't expect someone who hadn't paid to be 'allowed' to win. They are eligible to win because they have bought tickets.


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Of course: a conversational context a colloquial context can stand-in for and/or explain informality of speech. But not all informal contexts are oral. But why not just say conversation and colloquy and not use that word context at all.


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I'd understand that, I don't find "I booked you in..." to be particularly strange. I'd prefer saying "Remember you have a dentist appointment" or similar. I think its better to use "You..." instead of "I..." since it doesn't really matter who made the appointment.


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There is no significant difference. Both expressions mean that the handcuffs were quickly closed round the arrested person's wrist(s) with a sound described as either a snap or a click.


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Neither is a complete sentence The first is a noun phrase which would mean something like "This (or that) is a required login" The meaning is rather unclear: does login mean a "login name" or a "login in process". Perhaps the context makes it clear, perhaps not. The second would mean something like "A login is required&...


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There are many types of barriers. Yes, and therefore it might be a little tricky to pick the right preposition in certain cases. For example, in your second picture, "on the barrier" does not work because the child's foot is going through the barrier ("on the barrier" would work if the foot was resting above the upper/top rod/pipe). But &...


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Both would be correct depending on what you wanted to convey. I would probably say, "The mug covers the hole."


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While simply reversing the original sentence sentence as written is not natural, there are still a few ways it could be done. First, you could break it into two sentences: Those books that you don't really like? Don't read them. However, if the intent is to form a simple statement, that wouldn't work. Another possibility, as a simple statement, is to ...


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Those books that you don't really like, don't read them. It's possible but casual, not suitable for technical language. It would be okay in speech. Structurally this is two sentences. The first is a reduced sentence composed of a single noun phrase. This is equivalent to a complete sentence like: I'm referring to those books that you don really ...


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No, we don't say "can have to." Generally the options are: You may/might have to do x. (possibility) You could have to do x. (possibility) You will have to do x. (certainty)


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I agree with Brian Hitchock completely. I just sent a card to a college graduate with Brian's exact sentiment. Live "in" is being aware that one is aware at all times, while "for", to me, means that one is going to create something that might not have otherwise just happened and, once it's over, I'll move on. I much prefer "in" to "for".


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What verb or phrase do you use to describe situation where someone chooses to ignore or not to react to bad treatment from others. I personally use the phrase “put aside something” to describe such situations. Put aside something: to ignore or not deal with something: There are other phrases which can be used: Close your ears to something. Don’t mind ...


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