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3

To be honest, both sound perfectly fine. If I had to mark a difference between them, I would say that your second example sounds a bit more professional, like a question being proposed in an interview. Also, there is a mild difference in natural answers: "What new features of C# have you used?" In this case, you could honestly answer this question with ...


1

As an English man I have just come across this phrase in a foreign school teaching children English. I have to admit I have never heard anyone say or use the phrase, "What is the weather today ?". In England we would say, "What is the weather like today?" or " What is the weather forecast for today?". I hope that helps.


2

Here, "You have to wait" feels somewhat abrupt and rude. But if you switch that to "Parking will have to wait.", could this be heard more soft and polite? Ah at last a question I really appreciate about use of English and being Polite You have to wait and Parking will have to wait are both instructions and whilst using instructions maybe OK to use when ...


3

I think that this is referring to "raised eyebrows", but without more context I wouldn't be certain. Its a less common way to say the phase, but that's how I would interpret it. raise an eyebrow/ to raise your eyebrows - If something causes you to raise an eyebrow or to raise your eyebrows, it causes you to feel surprised or disapproving. Source ...


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You can write this either way, the single "is" is more fluid, a little smoother.


0

“Setup work environment” and “Configure development environment” are both understandable and idiomatic. The latter emphasizes the new employee’s role as a developer, is more specific, and is thus likely the better choice. Setting up the work environment may suggest other necessary but less important tasks like obtaining office supplies, arranging physical ...


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These are fine. With "names" of tasks you often use "headlinese", and drop particles and articles. The main function is that the name should be clear, short and easy to understand and remember, rather than "idiomatic". As part of a text or in speech, you would normally use "the". It isn't needed as a "headline". However you may want to use a different ...


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