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1

The phrasal uses, incomplete sentences are, "What is the good of" means if as a result, anything will turn out to be beneficial for us. "What is the use of" implies doubt about whether we will achieve anything positive that we need.


1

In a realistic situation neither is more correct or natural than the other. However there is a very nit-picky difference between the two which can make "write in a normal way" slightly ambiguous. "...write in a normal way" uses the indefinite article "a". This implies that there may be multiple normal ways in which it is ...


0

Yes, they are equivalent. They express that you are stating the crux of some issue.


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There are several ways you could say this, some that come to mind are: I know he’s my brother, but he really is one of the finest people. I’m not just saying this (because he’s my brother) - he really is one of the finest people. You may even simply start with: I know this could sound biased, but honestly...


1

If you knew for certain it was broken, you would say “you broke it”. Other common expressions, given that you’ve already described the problem/state (i.e. the car won’t start), would be: My car won’t start - you’ve done something to it! My car won’t start - what have you done to it?! This basically avoids the presumption inherent in saying “you broke it”, ...


0

The specifics have already been answered, but generally speaking, a scales sounds wrong immediately because you're matching a singular article with a plural noun. You either need to pair it with a determiner that takes a plural ("the scales", "some scales", "your scales") or use a singular group noun ("a pair of scales"...


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Either is fine - like you say, the present perfect also implies it's having some effect on the current time (it's still broken, I have to take the bus, I'm late etc.) whereas my car broke down just says that the event occurred in the past (the rest of your sentence is enough context to know it's still broken and affecting the present though!)


1

Used to implies some change has taken place - in the past, some action was done regularly ("I used to ride my bike to school") or some state was true ("this used to be more fun"), but at some point that changed (I stopped riding my bike, or I don't go to school anymore, and the fun thing became less fun). And the negative version says ...


0

Traditionally, things like scales, glasses, trousers have been seen as coming in two's and therefore are always used in the plural form. Nowadays, "scales" can be made from a single part. Actually, most often they are a single part, like in your first picture. But grammatically, we don't care about that. They are plural scales. Just checked the ...


1

I used to refers to a situation in the past that lasted for some time. So - I didn't have a phone (at a particular point in time). I didn't use to or I used not to have a phone = There was a period of time before I acquired one.


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I prefer the “didn’t use” option in the case where you now have a phone, but didn’t use to. The other option doesn’t seem to be clear on this. As to the whether it should be “use” or “used”, I’d say “use” in your specific case. There does seem to be some confusion around it, but I’d basically align it with the following examples: I used the soap. I did use ...


1

“Make every effort” is much more idiomatic, perhaps due to the following. The only slight nuance I can detect is that “all efforts” has the feel of knowing all of the “efforts” one could make when the statement is made, whereas “every effort” feels more like one is saying, if any opportunity presents itself, I will take it.


0

British English uses 'broken down'. Unsure if 'broke down' is considered to be grammatically correct in the USA.


-1

As an English native speaker with an A grade in English Grammar O-level ... I was taught to say 'Use some scales to measure the amount of flour needed' for example. You could say 'Use a ruler to measure that distance' but 'scales' implies a plural although it's not one. 'a set of scales' is equally fine though. As in .. 'Use a set of scales to measure the ...


3

I think that defining 'it' too strictly is causing some confusion. The word 'it' has a whole range of functions, including to refer to facts, events, or situations. In the explanation you linked, the author claims that the sentence Joe needs to prepare a list of all the projects assigned this year and to do it he needs to meet all the teachers. is ...


0

"Give [x] a hand" is an idiomatic way of saying help someone... however it is also an idiomatic way of inviting applause for someone. Context, of course, ought to make it clear which you mean. "A helping hand" is just a more specific idiom. "Lend a hand" is another.


1

Saying "personal reasons" practically means "please don't ask me for any further details." I don't hear "personal reason" very often.


4

"Personal reasons" is intentionally vague, and would be understood that way. It would not usually prompt a question as to what the reasons are, though hearers might speculate. It might be used even if there is only one specific reason. Saying "a personal reason" is less vague, implying something very specific. It would almost seem to ...


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These are not usually interchangeable. But here the headline is talking about choosing between the two, so "or" is possible. Matt Nagy had to make a choice: keep Mitchell Trubisky on, or substitute Nick Foles. He made the call to bring on Foles.


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