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1

In most contexts, there's no real distinction between the noun forms communication and communicating, but there's a noticeable difference in the idiomacy of certain constructions... I'm not sure why way is so much more likely with the continuous verb communicating, rather than the explicitly "nominal" ("noun-based") derivative ...


1

On and onto are both used when you have two different things, for example 'put the book on the table'. In this case the bottom band is not a separate thing to the skirt. The whole skirt is made up of bands. One of them has come unstitched. I would say 'can you repair this skirt' because the integrity of the skirt has been lost and you want the skirt restored ...


0

It could instead be phrased as: The ruffle on my skirt is loose. Can you repair the ruffle on my skirt?


3

Native Speakers probably would not phrase it that way. We would more likely say: The computer turned on The computer started and The computer turned off The computer shut down


7

You want to: "Mend or repair the seam that is joining two tiers on this skirt." A seam is any place where two pieces of fabric join together (one piece ends, the other piece starts). This is a tiered skirt--each individual layer is a tier. Mend is the word we use to describe fixing a seam when it is broken, repair is another generic alternative ...


15

Note that the part labelled a hem in the picture is not a hem- it is a separate piece of fabric. A hem is the edge of the fabric, folded over once or twice and then sewn to the fabric, to prevent the fabric from fraying. It is just the part below the stitching in this photo: [ Because the hem is always part of the main fabric, we don't say that the hem has ...


2

Close. It should be "back onto the skirt". "Back to ___" is usually used for places ("I went back to the office" meaning "I returned to the office") or people ("I gave it back to my sister" meaning "I returned it to my sister").


1

Option 3 ("when saving the file") sounds the most natural to me. Strictly speaking this implies that the user who is saving the file is the one doing the reformatting; to be completely correct it should be "To have the code reformatted when saving...." But this is unnecessary. Option 3 on its own is perfectly fine. Option 2 (again, in a ...


2

I don't think that the distinction which you make exists. I would use an idea for doing something to mean a possible way of solving a problem, and the idea of doing something for a completely new idea. I've got an idea for catching the rabbit. I had the idea of buying a rabbit, which could live in a hutch in the garden.


1

I can't play in the garden usually means 'I am not allowed to', but it could mean 'I am not able to' (for instance, if the child is ill or disabled). Changing can to could doesn't change that. I wish I could play in the garden could equally well mean I wish I were allowed to.


1

You use more to identify the greater of two things: you use most to identify the greatest of many things. In your sentence, there are only two things- signified and implied- so more is the correct word to use.


1

"More" would tell us that the implication is of greater importance than the significance. "Most" might mean that the implication is very important or, if it is used as a superlative, that the implication is of the greatest importance. "Most importantly" doesn't specifically compare the two. "More importantly" does.


3

In an old style phone the main part of the phone was mounted on the wall and there was a separate part, connected to the phone by a cable, which hung on a curved Y-shaped lever. To make a call or answer a call you picked up the separate part and a spring lifted the lever and changed the connections inside the phone. To end the call you hung this part back up ...


2

We turn off a mobile or cell phone when the use of mobiles is expressly forbidden; e.g. in the theatre, in an exam, and if we want to save power because the battery is low. However, when a conversation finishes abruptly, perhaps due to an argument, then it's possible to say "They hung up on me" or I hung up on them. hang up If you hang up or you ...


1

To stop is a transitive verb, whereas to struggle is an intransitive verb. From this source: A transitive verb is a verb that requires an object to receive the action. whereas An intransitive verb does not take an object. Using an object immediately after an intransitive verb will create an incorrect sentence. However, there may be other information ...


0

Yes, but as noted by https://stackoverflow.com/questions/35267365/standby-and-sleep-modes-in-a-mobile-phone Power-managment on mobile phones is quite sophisticated nowadays. Just "standby mode" and "sleep mode" are not enough to describe what is happening. So if you are talking to a regular user then "standby" is fine. If you ...


0

It depends on whether you are using a 3-dimensional (volume) metaphor (in) or a 2-dimensional (surface) metaphor (on). Hard drives, at least the rotating type, use surfaces of platters (albeit to a certain depth) to store magnetic information. Maybe that is where the terminology "on the drive" arose. "In the memory" may be a better fit ...


1

"A selected list of publications" means there are several different lists of publications, and you're selecting one of them. "A list of selected publications" means there are several publications, and you're selecting some of them and putting them into a list. Since you haven't specified how the selection is made, I can't tell you which ...


14

You could use both. The infinitive form means that you didn't know how to draw, and then she taught you, and now you do know how to draw. The "-ing" suggests that there is a skill called "drawing" and she taught a course in it. Perhaps were already able to draw, but she helped you improve.


0

Apple or banana, choose whichever you prefer. [pronoun] Apple or banana, choose whichever one you prefer. [adjective] Both are fine because whichever is a noun or an adjective. Merrian Webster - whichever


4

In American English, "on sale" can have either meaning depending on the context. The context is generally whether you would already expect the item to be available to be sold at that store or not. "Bananas are on sale at the grocery store." We would expect bananas to be available to be bought at the grocery store, so here, "on ...


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