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1

They are very similar. However "this once" implies that the event is a one off unlikley to be repeated, whereas "this time" implies the event was in doubt or unlikely but does not suggest it will be unique. So in: "The poker player had claimed to have a full house last hand, but this time he really did." we are not saying anything about any past or ...


0

I think there is a difference. I can't find the definition you wrote, "is to deal with a successful situation or problem", in the source you linked. The second meaning of "manage" in Macmillan is to deal successfully with a problem or difficult situation That is not the definition of "manage with" but just of "manage". I can't find "manage with" in ...


1

The first describes the conveyance, that is, the primary means by which you come. The second describes something that happens coincidentally. For example, if you were sitting in a car being carried by a flatbed truck, you would be going to work by truck, in a car. Following this construction one could go to work by car in ones pajamas, or in a Scottish ...


1

In British English (and I believe AmEng too) there are idiomatic ways of stating specific times on the clock, although these expressions do not necessarily apply when speaking about hours and minutes in general. You can write any time numerically in 12, or 24-hour format: Trains depart at 15:16, 15:46. 16:16 etc How we say those times depends on the ...


2

The idiomatic expression in English related to this is "every hour, on the hour" (with the comma sometimes being omitted, as in: By 2002, the RUC was run every hour, on the hour, producing 12-hour forecasts with a 1 hour temporal resolution. Which means that it ran at 10:00, 11:00, 12:00, etc etc. Closely-related is "every hour, on the half-hour" (with ...


13

What alephzero said (in comment) is also true of US English: "every hour at 16 past the hour." From Merriam Webster dictionary Definition of past the hour used with a certain number of minutes to indicate how long after the beginning of an hour something will happen "Trains leave every hour at ten minutes past the hour." This is more ...


1

You may hear more casual variations of this such as: There are trains at 16 past, every hour. The trains are at 16 past, every hour. Generally, the trains will not be running on the same schedule for the entire day, so you'll often hear this with a time constraint: There are trains at 16 and 39 past, every hour, until 5. There are trains at ...


43

I have seen this written many times on bus timetables etc. and find no reason why someone wouldn't understand it. To be extra clear, I would make one amend:: The train departs at 16 minutes past every hour. Or even better The train departs at 16 minutes past the hour, every hour.


0

Among your options I'd pick the latter as a good choice. Besides them, here are a few more options: Is there anything I can help you with? Can I help you with anything? Would you like me to help with anything? Is there any way I could be of assistance to you? Do you need any help? What is there I can help you with? Can I be of any assistance to you?


2

"Can I help you in any way?" would be much more common. Another variation which is perhaps more common (especially in a formal setting) would be: Can I help you at all? "Can I help you somehow?" would be more suited to a casual setting, although would more likely be said as: Can I help? You might also say: Can I help somehow? Saying it like this ...


1

I think you're right to try to find an alternative for your "excessive movements" line. I would rewrite your replacement sentence a bit, from: The puppeteer had a very passionate reaction upon seeing her, and he had to make great effort to contain his excitement, in case it should turn into an unwelcome accident. To: The puppeteer had a very ...


1

I'm assuming you are asking for a word like "Prost!" (German) and "¡Salud!" (Spanish). When you drink (can be alcohol or whatever) to celebrate, we often say "to have a toast to". When you clang the mugs together like in a table for celebration, people often say "Toast!", "Cheers!", "Toast/Cheers to [the success]". For example: You and your friends are ...


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