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54

It's used both ways – it can indeed be an expression of confidence, but it can also be a genuine request for clarification. And even in the former case, you can usually assume that the speaker is in fact reasonably open to being corrected. (Though maybe not in a "heated debate"!")


13

I hear "correct me if I'm wrong, [name]" quite often in my office environment. It is used when someone is answering the question that they were asked while at the same time acknowledging that someone else in the conversation may have better knowledge to offer. They might also say "keep me honest, [name]" for the same effect of inviting someone to chime in ...


4

So here's a couple of things: This is Peppy the Inspirational Cat. Drawn by October Jones (who also did "Text from Dog.) He used to leave these on trains and take pictures so original poster's picture is wrong. Anyway: Peppy delivers slightly "over the top" motivational messages. So when people say they hate Mondays, Peppy says "Don't hate Monday" meaning ...


2

From Merriam-Webster: b. computers : to cause (something, such as a file or picture) to appear on a computer screen. Both bring up and pull up are frequently used in this context. For example, from a blog post about using the Microsoft Windows on-screen keyboard: On Windows 10 and 8, there are actually two on-screen keyboards: the basic ...


2

I think you may be looking at the wrong part of the sentence here. I believe you want to consider: To focus [something] on [something else]. To focus on: to give most of your attention to someone or something Def.


2

"Earliest" means the most early, hence would refer to the first of your paintings. "Earlier" means the early ones, without a specific timestamp, so it would refer to any of your previous paintings. Hence, earliest would describe those paintings perfectly, without any doubt of the time-of-their-making in the audience's mind.


1

"Staying closer to home" is simply what you do when not going away for a holiday/vacation, but still taking the time off from school/work. It does not imply that the person is at home the whole time, or even in their neighborhood the whole time. It is an extremely relative term and can change meaning based on the context: A mom saying "stay close to home"...


1

Figured out means "understood" or "solved", as you noted. I think the problem here is with "it" or "it all". "He's got it all figured out" would, in general, means "he's got life solved" and would imply that the person has worked out a successful way of living. In this context, it would go beyond merely making a lot of money (because that was explicitly ...


1

No, it doesn't mean if you omit good things. The hint of what she means is earlier in the story, when she says: "So many people visited, and the fireplace made all of them want to tell amazing stories; the child who happened to be standing on the right corner when the door of the ice cream truck came open and hundreds of popsicles crashed out; he man ...


1

"Any life will seem dramatic if you omit mention of most of it." She actually means: All lives have dramatic moments, leave out the boring parts. The author is using irony, a typical literary device. most of it=most of any life. Merriam Webster definition of irony: Irony | Definition of Irony by Merriam-Webster https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/...


1

Yes, you are correct that the passage means, "one bit [of the sand] was glinting (sparkling) more than the rest [of the sand]", and of course that bit was the diamond, not sand. But the specific phrase, "one bit glinting more than the rest", is just a literal description of the way the event happened. The story, taken as a whole, is about the extra meaning ...


1

It doesn't really mean either of those things; it suggests that music has an effect similar to that of the painting Mr Carslake looks at in the passage from Virginia Woolf's "A Simple Melody" that this scholar (Emma Sutton) is referring to: Mr Carslake, at least, thought [the painting] very beautiful because, as he stood in the corner where he could see it, ...


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