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English commonly uses "over" that way to speak of a visit, e.g., "I will come over later." "We'll come over to your house tomorrow." The word in that use is classed as an adverb. See American Heritage Dictionary: AHD "over" 3e c. To one's place of residence or business: invited us over for cocktails. The form "will be over" means the speaker will have ...


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One of the meanings of 'over' is 'to another place'. When people are going from one place to another, they can call that 'going over' to the other place. If someone says 'come over' they mean 'come to my house or apartment, or my current location'. 'I'll be over right away' means 'I will be where you are very soon; I am leaving now'. One of the meanings of ...


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Not quite. Said as much is an idiom meaning said roughly the same thing. It doesn't actually have the idea of the amount they said. She caught herself means "She stopped, and didn't do something". So, together, it means Hadn't Mrs Pritchard nearly said the same thing, but she stopped and didn't say it?


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First, in case it wasn't apparent, "can't lie around" is a contraction of "It can't lie around". Leaving off the initial "it" here gives more of a feeling of a quick, casual thought, rather than something that the speaker is really thinking about carefully. As for the meaning, the speaker is saying "What does a cat do on its day off? It can't lie around ...


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It simply means that she took two steps at a time. To better visualise it she skipped one step each time she took a stride.


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It's a set phrase or idiom. If something or someone gets under your skin, it means you are constantly thinking or obsessing about that thing or person. I cannot really speak for the quality of the Spanish translation. Using Google translate Te llevo bajo mi piel comes back into English as "I wear you under my skin". Given the metaphorical nature of the ...


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To plot a route on a map is, in its most literal sense, to draw a line on it indicating the path you intend to travel; plot here is a verb in the same sense as plotting a graph. The phrase is also used metaphorically when nobody is actually drawing a line, or indeed has an actual map to draw on, but is deciding upon the course a planned journey of any sort, ...


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Nothing is said about whether you hit him or not. To take a swing at someone or something (e.g. a ball in a game such as baseball) is to attempt to strike them or it, with a fist, weapon, bat, etc. The context or following words will clarify whether the swing connected (the objective was achieved). It is possible to say "He took a swing at me but I ducked". ...


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This is some financial jargon, and is principally an American usage. "Closing" a loan is when you and the lender sign the final legal documents and the lender sends the money. It is the last step of taking out a loan, but before you start paying back any money. https://www.readynest.com/homebuyer-stories/what-to-expect-at-loan-closing When buying a house, ...


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"To close" is to finalize the purchase of a home, with the signing of documents. That phrase is used whether there is a mortgage loan or not. The buyer becomes the owner of the home, but does not possess the deed, which is held by the mortgage company until the mortgage is paid off. The author seems to use the phrase "closing on a mortgage loan" to mean ...


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No, in that sentence, it means "I was not present during those events." AHD "around" adj (3) 3. Being in evidence; present: asked if the store manager was around.


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The use of "etc." (and its period) I don't think are really a problem. This is fairly common (and correct usage) and most people will not be confused by the use of a period in an abbreviation in the middle of a sentence. There are a couple of comments I would make on other aspects, however: First, you should have a comma before "etc." as it is a separate ...


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"Full form" here does refer to a whole body. It refers to the entirety of the thing being referenced. In this case the thing that has been referenced is the hands so full form would refer to the entire thing(we can assume here that it would be a human or similar) including the hands The "chiefly" refers to the entire list that follows it. So it mostly ...


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A governess is hired to take care of children. They are her "charges". These charges had reached an age where they didn't need her to take care of them ("they had outgrown her"), so she lost her job.


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The second sentence strikes me as atypical English usage. A more typical way of writing it would be "She ran up the steps two at a time", meaning that she ascended two steps with each stride. Although "stair" can be used as a singular noun, the word "step" is used far more often for that purpose. If someone goes "up the stairs" from the first to the ...


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A jury makes decisions based on provable facts, not from rumour or gossip. So the question Is there, in reality, anything, as lawyers would say, to go to a jury with? means Is there enough evidence to convince anyone that [sceances, levitation etc] are genuine?


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Holy compound sentence Batman. Yes. Or at least they should not be disregarded. But even an imposture may call for unmasking, And popular delusions howeverabsurd, are often too important to be neglected by the wiser portion of mankind . Could be ()Popular delusions () are () too important to be neglected by the wiser portion of mankind . But note ...


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To answer this question we need to learn some basic terminology in typography: type: The term type is used generally to mean letters and other characters assembled into pages for printing or other means of reproduction Leading: (it's pronounced LEDing - as in the metal lead)Leading is the spacing between the baselines of type. The term leading is ...


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The creator of the program is being interviewed. He is talking about how he controls the way his program will appear to viewers. He says that when the program is presented on different devices (computers or television sets), the appearance may change due to different settings, such as brightness and contrast, that the viewer can change. He simplifies his ...


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Imagine someone who wrestles pigs or alligators or pythons for a living, having to pin them down in the mud of their habitat. That's literally "down in the mud", where the worker gets all dirty doing their work. Imagine someone who has to deal with criminals, as a bounty hunter must. He probably gets dirty in another sense. That's figuratively "down in the ...


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More of A and less of B: speaking of a mixture of two things, he says there will be more of A in the mixture and less of B. A is "the freakier side" B is "the geekier side". The word "side" means approximately "aspect" or "character". Both "freakier" and "geekier" are comparatives, but that's not important. It would mean the same if it said "more of the ...


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