60

The expression is not even that dated, e.g. here's a movie from 2020 with exact this title, and there's another one from 2012. In neither case is the title supposed to be a sentence addressed to a male kid. Note that you can also say "Oh, brother" (quote from Daria) even if you don't have one: Daria - (rolls eyes) Oh, brother. Jake - He calls ...


51

In the context of architecture, 'in plan' means 'as viewed from above' (it's the same as 'bird's eye view'). It's because building plans are drawn as if you're looking at them from above. So 'rectangular in plan' means that the building is the shape of a rectangle when you look at it from a bird's eye view.


37

You can, the "boy" in the phrase is not addressed to the person you are speaking to. (It probably started as a minced oath with "boy" replacing the blasphemous "Jesus" or "God") There is a well known song by Buddy Holly with lyrics "Oh boy, when you're with me...". As slang it is a little dated. Buddy Holly'...


25

I don't know the technical term for it, but I believe this is a common pattern for nouns describing aspects of something: the sky was red in colour he was stocky in build it was square in shape The pattern is that "X (concrete noun) is Y (adjective) in Z (aspect noun)" means roughly "the Z (aspect noun) of X (concrete noun) is Y (adjective)&...


8

In this context "plan" is an adjective describing a drawing or view and is distinct from "section" and "elevation". See Plan, Section, Elevation Architectural Drawings Explained In that phrase "in plan" is an abbreviation of "in plan view".


7

Can I say “Oh boy” to a girl? The best way to understand this issue for an English learner. When you utter phrases such as ... "Fuck!" "O-M-G!" "Oh Boy!" "Wow! "Holy Hell!" ... you are not addressing anyone. That speech fragment is not directed to the person you are talking to. They are exclamations. ...


6

"The least" is just a measure of less than the others. Like A < B. A < C. A < D... The first sentence does not necessarily mean you dislike her. Maybe you like everyone else very much, and of all the people you like, you like her the least. In the second sentence, the device may be expensive, but it is cheaper than the other options.


6

That is ambiguous. Now pragmatically I'd assume you went to the restaurant last night. I guess this because 1) people usually go to restaurants in the evening. and 2) if she'd recommended it last night, there isn't much time for you to have gone since then. But adding context, or changing a word can change the interpretation Last night, before we left, I ...


6

'In the last week' suggests that you don't know when exactly your son was born, but are sure it was no more than one week ago, which would, as you observe, be an odd thing for a new parent to say. 'Last week' is natural though. The French website is right. La semaine dernière means 'last week', and la dernière semaine means 'the last week'. 'In the last week'...


4

If you said "eye ache", you would be understood, but you will notice that it is not an accepted compound word like headache or toothache. I think most people would say they have "eye pain" or "pain in my eyes". "Sore eyes" tends to mean tired or strained eyes rather than pain. Remember that 'headache' has come to mean ...


4

"Another" is always singular. Despite how its usage has drifted, it still grammatically functions like the two-word phrase it's derived from, "an other": singular article "an", i.e. one. With a plural noun like headphones, we have to construct the sentence differently. "The other ones" of course has a definite article, ...


3

The word "those" is a pronoun, and refers to something. It's plural so it must refer to a plural somethings. Looking at the quote you should realise that it says Her eyes met those of a large caterpillar. "Those" refers to "eyes" so this could be paraphrased as Her eyes met the eyes of a large caterpillar. With the idiomatic ...


3

Their meaning is near identical. There is a slight shade of emphasis because of the verb tense, though. "How did you make it this far" puts the emphasis on what might have happened to get you here—it asks you to explain your past. "How have you made it this far" puts the emphasis on your current situation—it asks you to explain your ...


3

It could be about any of those things. How it would be understood could depend on the wider context. For example if you were visiting a restaurant for the first time they might tell you the "speciality of the restaurant". If you went regularly, they might tell you about something that was not usually on the menu.


3

It may be the age of the translation, but I don't think the English works well here. A comma may help. A "level" can mean "a flat tract of land". (This is a rarer sense, nowadays mostly in proper nouns like "The Somerset Levels", but here it is a common noun) But then the translator seems to get slightly mixed up. Perhaps ...


2

To "sit with" something, as in your quote, doesn't mean to fully accept it, but to consciously not struggle with it, so observe yourself thinking about it or feeling it. Sitting with something can help you come to accept it, or "come to terms" with it, but they don't mean the same thing. It's possible to sit with something, and still not ...


2

The meaning is like these: Merriam-Webster sit 8 : lie, rest 9a : to have a location 10 : to remain inactive or quiescent When you are sitting, you are remaining in one place. You aren't walking or running or fleeing, you are stationary. In this context, it means that there will be negative emotions, and there's no point to struggling against them.


2

It's a dated expression. When pre-recorded videocassettes first became available (long before it was possible to watch films online), shops used to hire them out so that you could watch a film without having to buy your own copy of the videocassette. "Get a video out" means hire a videocassette for the night".


2

Let's go have lunch, John. Great, let's go now. idioms: have lunch, have breakfast, have tea, have dinner, have supper I'm organizing a lunch for Mary, John. Will you be able to attend? Yes, I'd love to come to a lunch for Mary. I was planning a cocktail party, but your idea of a lunch is better. idiomatic expression of an eating [ha ha] event: a lunch, a ...


2

Since 'incapable of Annihilation' means indestructible, or forever continuing on, perhaps the phrase could also be thus: ...that the Legislative powers, 'still and always in effect', have returned to the people at large for their exercise;...


2

Yes, they have the same meaning - also "Which one is your husband?" Who among them is not very idiomatic for identifying an individual. You might use it for asking whether something applies to any member(s) of a group. Who among them has been vaccinated?


2

It could be a question which refers to all three of your ideas however it's most likely to be about your first idea. It's likely a question about "something delicious" since it's referring to a good thing on the menu today. It is most likely simply to be about the most positive thing on the menu on this particular day out of all days. It could ...


2

If you acquire something, or are allowed to do something, by courtesy of a particular person, it's a rather formal way of saying that that person has had the courtesy to give you the thing or the permission (has been polite enough to do so). In your example, the writer has used the formal phrase in a mildly humorous way to indicate that the producer has ...


2

The phrase is written in a kind of headlinese, so it is hard to parse, but your second interpretation is correct. Bans is a noun, and the protesters want the bans "off our bodies". You could think of it as (We want) bans off (of) our bodies or Bans, (get) off our bodies! It's similar in style to signs saying "hands off our (whatever)&...


2

"might not turn out to be so" After you learn more, you might learn that your first understanding was wrong. "According to American movies, all Japanese girls are submissive. But when I married a Japanese girl, it turned out not to be so. Some Japanese girls are stubborn." "on paper" The things that you write on paper often ...


2

Cain is a proper name; the Biblical character who was the first murderer. This says that it's an American idiom, though I as a British person am quite familiar with it. It means to create a disturbance, make a big fuss about something. It's only used of people, so you can't say that a mathematical formula does so.


2

I suggest these meanings for "note" in that passage: Merriam-Webster note 2 a : a characteristic feature (as of odor or flavor) b : something (such as an emotion or disposition) like a note in tone or resonance a note of sadness; end on a high note Then, a leading note is a feature or aspect that stands out above others. It's worth mentioning ...


2

"I am renting a house" would generally mean you have completed the negotiations and have a contract, whether you are actually moved in is a bit more questionable though in most cases could safely be assumed. This is from a western US perspective, I suppose this could vary by location.


2

The phrase "work out of your system" is a somewhat informal way of saying: It will take a while for your body to metabolize the drug so that its traces are no longer in your system. But the intent is to indicate that the process of the body eliminating the drug takes some time.


2

It is your definition 1: the skis are not in "the way" (sitting in the middle of a commonly used path, or preventing you from reaching something else). Instead they are out of "the way". "The way" in this phrase is used almost literally to mean "the path," if that helps you understand it. "Out of the way" in ...


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