14

"Increased X%" or "increased by X%" or "up X%" or "up by X%" all mean the same. To increase an amount by a percentage is to take the original amount, and add to it the given percentage of that amount. Thus 'increased by 100%' means the same as 'doubled'. 100 increased by 120% is equal to 100 + (100 x 1.20) which is 220....


3

"A number of" deliberately means "an unspecified number". Usually you can infer the order of magnitude from the context (for example, it's unlikely that millions of scientists sued Facebook at once), and it usually doesn't indicate a large number (majority) in that context, but there's no way to put a specific value to it. "A number ...


3

In this context state is an uncountable noun (not an adjective) meaning "management of state and related concerns." A more colloquial way of saying it would be "more saving and keeping track of data." (In this case it refers to the use of the result variable.) As is helpfully pointed out in a comment, this is computer jargon. Most ...


3

The song is a comedy sketch. It is a satire on people who sing songs that they do not know the meaning of the words just because the melody is catchy. The artist is complaining about his dislike of singing for ignorant fans right to the ignorant fans. But, none of them know what he is saying because it sounds nice. He then gets the fans to sing along. ...


3

If you ignore (sarcastic) at the front, then you are correct that "There's a plan" (as it would normally be said/written) means something close to 'good' - it's only a good plan if it works! However, the entire sentence is spoken sarcastically, so that needs to be negated - Rachel is actually saying that she doesn't like the idea at all.


3

When you use the verb "to get" with some condition (like "sick"), this means the initial arrival or onset of the condition. It occurs over a relatively short time period, so that is why it's not correct to use it with an extended time-span like "since yesterday." Instead, we use the "to be" with the condition to ...


3

This is the final line from the first verse of the patriotic song America (My Country, 'Tis of Thee). This song is extremely well known in the US and is sung nearly as often as the actual national anthem, so in part, the author is using this phrase to evoke a feeling of patriotism and love of country simply by referencing a patriotic song that all Americans ...


3

When reading “let freedom ring” just now, I imagined not the iconic song America (My Country, 'Tis of Thee) but rather the voice of Martin Luther King Jr. with what is perhaps his most famous speech: I Have a Dream (which itself is referencing the song). You can read (or watch) the full speech online to see what you think, but the way I interpret the speech ...


3

The sentence says that art historians have been not so much revising the concept of the Renaissance (changing the way they think about it), as eliminating the concept (deciding that the Renaissance didn't happen at all). This has nothing to do with revising a piece of work; it refers to revising their ideas about the Renaissance (or not, in this case). ...


3

The phrase "much to his despair" is a variation of the phrase "be the despair of". This sentence is saying that because this person's friend went back on his word (going back on your word is when you break a promise or you fail to uphold a commitment you made), it caused this person's friend despair. In this sentence, "despair" ...


3

"In a way that caused him to feel despair." The friend's going back on his word is the reason for his despair, and so (by definition) it contributes much to that feeling. Much to his surprise and much to his dismay are also common variations on the same formula, as well as their plainer versions without "much": to his surprise and to his ...


3

Both are grammatically correct, but in conversation or in practice we'll use the second sentence because "being late" is equal to "my being late" or it is understandable that about whom we are talking.


3

It is simply an idiom expressing surprise, and the third word has no literal meaning. Which any given person uses can probably be attributed to the regional dialect where they grew up.


2

On fire is usually used of a building or vehicle which is burning, while you can set fire to anything combustible, including an object small enough to hold. So, in the case of a house, there is no difference in meaning.


2

Shylock is a character in a play that could be described as a person who is ruthless and greedy and dishonest. The statement that "he didn’t need to act much for that!" just means that the man they were talking about was so horrible a person, that not much acting would have been necessary to portray just that kind of a person. "And so with ...


2

There's nothing particularly wrong with using the word "current" as a metaphor for the flow of data from one place to another, it's just not commonly used in this context and it's likely that the listener won't understand what you mean. Stream, on the other hand, has a well-defined meaning in computing and is a more commonly used metaphor.


2

Yes, you are on the right track. The expression is used to warn against using a difficult or obscure word (a so-called "big word") when a simple one would suffice. Separately, you can refer to a complicated word as a [high value] word (e.g. a 5 dollar word) and a simple word as a [low value] word (e.g. a 5 cent word). I found a blog post that has ...


2

The question "How do the trains run?", in context, means "What are the train schedules?" or "When will there be trains available?", with the same meaning: "When can I get one?". The statement "There is a good train in about three-quarters of an hour." means that that will be a suitable train for getting to ...


2

The context gives lots of clues: meet your daughter (for the first time...) Congratulations (for what has just happened....) deliver her himself (deliver has a specific meaning here....) Skyler has just given birth! (and Walt is the Father). The "bundle of joy" is the newborn baby, and Ted drove Skyler to the hospital because Walt wasn't ...


2

I am 70, born and raised in the USA, Caucasian, Protestant, middle class. We used this phrase a lot when I was young; I mainly remember hearing and saying it in high school in the mid- to late ‘60’s. It means “You’re not the only one,” “It’s not that big a deal.” It’s like a shrug . . . a “meh.”


2

Regarding the usage of to: to preposition 2 b —used as a function word to indicate the result of an action or a process // broken all to pieces // go to seed // to their surprise, the train left on time (M-W) to preposition 2.2 Governing a phrase expressing someone's reaction to something. ‘to her astonishment, he smiled’ ‘Much to his surprise, this small ...


2

They are both natural and understandable sentences, and I would expect either of them to come out of the mouth of a native English speaker. However, when you use a possessive for an action like this, it adds an implication of moral blame or responsibility. This becomes more apparent if you put in a context where the person isn't necessarily angry. So as ...


1

You are almost exactly right about the meaning of complacent - which is used in a broad range of contexts with very similar effect. Typically the meaning is that the "complacent" person has assumed something - usually, something to their comfort or advantage - without examining the details of the situation. For example: The factory owner had been ...


1

To take things literally is to understand words as only what was actually written/said rather than what the author/speaker intended it to mean. In the case of laws or policies, we sometimes contrast “the letter of the law” (literal) and “the spirit of the law” (intent), which are often quite different and can be exploited by creative people.


1

"More likely than not" logically means with a probability greater than 50%. A probability of 50% would be "as likely as not". But the user of the phrase is not making a mathematically precise estimate of probability. They are expressing what they think is likely in an intentionally vague way, and it's misplaced precision to try to assign ...


1

Time may be referred to as if it were a physical location. For instance, we may ask where something happens in a movie, rather than when. This may come from books, where time is more obviously physical (which page you’re on). The election is 100 days in the future. Means the same as: The election is 100 days out (or away). The assumed reference point is ...


1

"Out from" is another way of saying "away from." I hear people say "away from" more often than "out from," and "away from" is the more formal way of saying it. You could say "The polls show Biden is a clear favorite 100 days away from an unprecedented election." You could even say "The polls ...


1

Sounding like a native English speaker (any standard variety of English) I disagree with the interpretation provided for this simple reason: My boss's problem [singular] and My boss's problems [plural] are the simplest and most idiomatic way of expressing what ails the boss: one problem or more problems than one. The "of the" point is just awkward. ...


1

Here's the appropriate sense of goodwill that's being used in the sentence: [Merriam-Webster] 1 a : a kindly feeling of approval and support : benevolent interest or concern        // people of goodwill What the sentence is saying is that the more Mrs. Hurst and Miss Bingley were exposed to Miss Bennet's pleasing manner, the more goodwill they had for her. ...


1

As the narrator came to know her better, they found that she isn't really intimidating, she's actually playful once you peel the first layers. Very near the surface here means once you know her just a little, you don't need to dig deep to find the playful side of her.


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