110

It’s both a compliment about your skill with English and a self-deprecating joke about our own lack of skill (likely zero) with yours, in hopes this will put you at ease. The subtext here is that we will forgive any slowness, errors or difficulties you have and are happy to clarify anything we say if needed. We care more about the content of what you’re ...


34

"Save" is being used to mean "put away for later". "Save" is often used this way when referring to money "Saving up to buy a car", or if someone wants you to share "save some for me". "Room" is being used to mean "empty space". When entering a large gymnasium, one might say "there is ...


33

To a native English speaker, "I am all stomach" obviously references back to the phrase "I am all ears", which means "I am ready and eager to hear what you have to say". This phrase would probably be interpreted to mean "I am ready and eager to eat what you are offering to feed me." Additionally, as BlueRaja - Danny ...


30

This is typical Biblical language: when all these adjectives are used together, we are encouraged to think of the needy in general. It's not so much about specific naked people. So, your interpretation is pretty good. Typical examples: I was naked and you clothed Me; I was sick and you visited Me; I was in prison and you came to Me.’ (Matthew 25:36) Is it ...


28

I think that it's a play on words similar to the idiom "I'm all ears", meaning that person "b" is eager to eat, or eager to hear or know what they are eating or going to eat.


26

I agree with the comment by @Michael Harvey although I can't quote a source. For me, "roll over" means "move over" or "move out of the way" There's an old children's rhyme There were ten in a bed and the little one said "Roll over, roll over" So they all rolled over and one fell out There were nine in a bed and the ...


21

From wikipedia The lyric "roll over Beethoven and tell Tchaikovsky the news" refers to how classical composers would roll over in their graves upon hearing that classical music had given way to rock and roll. further details: (Enough to make one) "turn in one's grave" is an idiom to describe an extreme level of shock or an intense ...


20

I found an answer on brainly.in that describes it as: Usually a bully is arrogant and dominating. The poet wishes that if a bully could become softer and more compatible with others, just as butter on toast. There's no idiom "buttered on toast" and I'm a native American English speaker. However, in the context of poetry there is often significant ...


20

Really, it could mean either. If you're talking about a person, it would mean the person is intelligent (this is the more common usage). But if you were talking about an organisation, it would mean they have many intelligent people. It depends on the context.


19

Yes, the meanings are practically equivalent. Michael Harvey makes an argument that one can always shit oneself but can only shit one's pants if one is wearing pants to begin with; a counterargument is that if one is not wearing pants, it's more likely to shit the floor rather than oneself. In the event one is wearing pants the distinction is slight, but ...


18

Not quite. The phrase "con artist" does not mean someone who counterfeits paintings or sculpture. "Artist" here is being used in a more general sense to refer to anyone who is very good at something. Like you might say, "the chef is an artist at creating great desserts". So the phrase "con artist" means "someone ...


17

It means "everything is perfect", perhaps in way that is "too good to be true". I've not heard it before, but there are a number of other similar idioms: "everything is rainbows and butterflies" "everything is rainbows and unicorns" It is quite common for English speakers to make up their own version of this idiom, ...


17

'Trivia' is an extremely broad term. It could mean information (usually general knowledge, minor details) about almost any subject. A themed-party is normally centred around a specific subject. However, 'trivia' has become synonymous with quizzes - games or competitions in which you answer questions about general knowledge. My best guess would be that a '...


17

Commentors have noted a financial sense, but I don't think this fits this context. The sense of "making excessive buying and selling of stocks to profit from the commission" may point towards the meaning, but doesn't directly relate Las Vegas. So we look at the general meanings and find move or cause to move about vigorously. (lexico) It is ...


16

"Closely written" has a literal and figurative meaning. It literally means that the letters and words have been written close together so as to pack more onto the page. Figuratively, it just means that a lot of detail is contained in a relatively small amount of writing. A comparable expression is "tightly written", which means brevity ...


16

"The past day" can mean either yesterday or the previous 24 hours. The survey that went out to students was probably something like: How many hours did you spend playing sports yesterday? But the article is talking about the survey after it happened, so if the article used "yesterday" you would think it meant your (the reader's) yesterday....


15

"Increased X%" or "increased by X%" or "up X%" or "up by X%" all mean the same. To increase an amount by a percentage is to take the original amount, and add to it the given percentage of that amount. Thus 'increased by 100%' means the same as 'doubled'. 100 increased by 120% is equal to 100 + (100 x 1.20) which is 220....


15

It means, "Are you too full to eat dessert?" Here is a definition from The Free Dictionary: To refrain from eating too much so that one still has an appetite for something else later on.


15

No. Andy North is saying that this strategy is unpleasant and worthless, just like excrement. The word "singularly" here means "unusually". Insulting people's beliefs is an unusually poor strategy for educating them. Added in light of the lively discussion below: The use of "singular" to mean "highly unusual" or "...


15

It could either be the equivalent of "yesterday" - or it could mean "the past 24 hours". The meaning could extend into the past no further than that. This usage is vague. While I will agree that the most likely intended meaning is "the past 24 hours", I would never use this where communication was critical, or where ...


13

I would not use "peel" or "peelings" that way. You could say. "After you have peeled the potatoes, put the peels in the trash". I have an image of the skin of a fruit or vegetable that have been cut away with knife or special tool. Although plural, and so "countable" we don't normally put a number on the word "...


13

In literal terms, if a certain issue is "on the ballot," it means that when a voter fills out a ballot (i.e., a paper form or computer screen on which a person's vote is recorded), the voter has to mark his/her opinion regarding that issue as part of the process of voting. For example, if the legal drinking age is "on the ballot," it ...


13

You need to break this down into its component parts. A "shit strategy" means a "bad strategy", where he is using a bit of a potty mouth to emphasize how bad he thinks it is. Then when he adds an adverb "singularly shit" he is saying that this strategy is so bad, it is distinguished as being singular. That it is the one, the ...


11

Strictly speaking, a rite of passage is a ceremony marking a person's transition into a new phase of life (a tribal initiation, confirmation or bar mitzvah, university graduation). Here, it's being used more loosely to mean 'something that people in that situation feel they have to do when they grow up'.


11

It means that human beings should not try to study God, because God is beyond human understanding. To presume is to exceed limits undesirably. The first definition for presume on the Merriam-Webster page is: to undertake without leave or clear justification : DARE "Scan" means survey or examine. Pope says it is an unjustified act of daring to try ...


11

A recognized definition of pull is to do something, as in "pull an all-nighter." It is fairly common slang to use the phrase "pull a [person's name]" to mean replicating some accomplishment of that person. Usually, this accomplishment is at the very least surprising or even some underhanded deception. There's a related idiom, to pull a ...


11

No, the choice between "literal" listen and "metaphoric" look has no implications for intended meaning in such contexts. It's entirely a stylistic choice. And both versions are only likely in casual spoken contexts, so there's no difference in "level of formality" either. On the other hand, there is often a difference between ...


11

"Con artist" is short for "confidence artist" - the medium they work in and manipulate is people's confidence or trust. "Dodgy" often refers to someone who is successful in evading accountability for harm they've caused, and who has morals the describer likely disagrees with.


11

In the context you mention (microwaving something in water, e.g. instant oatmeal) I have usually seen two distinct options: Boil water in a kettle or on the stove, and add the boiling water to a bowl containing the product. Add the product and cold water to a microwaveable container and microwave them together. But if the instructions really do say to put ...


11

You ask about the correct usage of, “I’ve sh—.” I took you as asking about the past participle. If you only meant to Bowdlerize, I hope you still find this interesting. James K had an excellent comment pointing out that shat is not widely-used. In fact, it started as a joke only a few centuries ago. You’ll more commonly hear, in America, “He’s shit ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible