110

It’s both a compliment about your skill with English and a self-deprecating joke about our own lack of skill (likely zero) with yours, in hopes this will put you at ease. The subtext here is that we will forgive any slowness, errors or difficulties you have and are happy to clarify anything we say if needed. We care more about the content of what you’re ...


60

The expression is not even that dated, e.g. here's a movie from 2020 with exact this title, and there's another one from 2012. In neither case is the title supposed to be a sentence addressed to a male kid. Note that you can also say "Oh, brother" (quote from Daria) even if you don't have one: Daria - (rolls eyes) Oh, brother. Jake - He calls ...


51

In the context of architecture, 'in plan' means 'as viewed from above' (it's the same as 'bird's eye view'). It's because building plans are drawn as if you're looking at them from above. So 'rectangular in plan' means that the building is the shape of a rectangle when you look at it from a bird's eye view.


40

From a computing perspective, I would not perceive a negative connotation to the word “disabled”, as it is a very common term. Part of the negative connotation it has in referring to people is precisely because it is so commonly used in connection to inanimate objects. However, there is a difference in subtext between “disabled” and “not enabled” and it ...


37

You can, the "boy" in the phrase is not addressed to the person you are speaking to. (It probably started as a minced oath with "boy" replacing the blasphemous "Jesus" or "God") There is a well known song by Buddy Holly with lyrics "Oh boy, when you're with me...". As slang it is a little dated. Buddy Holly'...


34

"Save" is being used to mean "put away for later". "Save" is often used this way when referring to money "Saving up to buy a car", or if someone wants you to share "save some for me". "Room" is being used to mean "empty space". When entering a large gymnasium, one might say "there is ...


33

To a native English speaker, "I am all stomach" obviously references back to the phrase "I am all ears", which means "I am ready and eager to hear what you have to say". This phrase would probably be interpreted to mean "I am ready and eager to eat what you are offering to feed me." Additionally, as BlueRaja - Danny ...


32

The attorney is not speaking very clearly, but he is saying "a Kafka-esque nightmare." The "ka" syllable is almost lost, but you can hear it if you know to listen for it. Kafkaesque, adjective Marked by a senseless, disorienting, often menacing complexity. Marked by surreal distortion and often a sense of impending danger. In the manner ...


30

This is typical Biblical language: when all these adjectives are used together, we are encouraged to think of the needy in general. It's not so much about specific naked people. So, your interpretation is pretty good. Typical examples: I was naked and you clothed Me; I was sick and you visited Me; I was in prison and you came to Me.’ (Matthew 25:36) Is it ...


28

I think that it's a play on words similar to the idiom "I'm all ears", meaning that person "b" is eager to eat, or eager to hear or know what they are eating or going to eat.


27

Unwanted touching by another person of a sexually significant area of the body is sexual assault. In the workplace, this is taken as seriously as fraud or falsifying financial records (that is what 'cooking the books' means). In modern times, misdeeds other than finance-related ones are considered by employers to be significantly damaging to their reputation....


25

I don't know the technical term for it, but I believe this is a common pattern for nouns describing aspects of something: the sky was red in colour he was stocky in build it was square in shape The pattern is that "X (concrete noun) is Y (adjective) in Z (aspect noun)" means roughly "the Z (aspect noun) of X (concrete noun) is Y (adjective)&...


21

Here comes the train is the natural and correct way of saying "The train is arriving now." The train comes here is gramatically correct but has a different meaning: "When the train comes, this is the location it comes to." It does not say anything about whether the train is coming now or in three hours or in four weeks. Here the train ...


20

Really, it could mean either. If you're talking about a person, it would mean the person is intelligent (this is the more common usage). But if you were talking about an organisation, it would mean they have many intelligent people. It depends on the context.


19

Yes, the meanings are practically equivalent. Michael Harvey makes an argument that one can always shit oneself but can only shit one's pants if one is wearing pants to begin with; a counterargument is that if one is not wearing pants, it's more likely to shit the floor rather than oneself. In the event one is wearing pants the distinction is slight, but ...


19

This question structure is a common mistake, made by combining two common questions: "How does it look?" and "What does it look like?" "Look like" needs a noun object, while "look" needs an adjective or adverb after it. "What" is the interrogative pronoun (question word) for nouns, and "how" is the ...


18

Not quite. The phrase "con artist" does not mean someone who counterfeits paintings or sculpture. "Artist" here is being used in a more general sense to refer to anyone who is very good at something. Like you might say, "the chef is an artist at creating great desserts". So the phrase "con artist" means "someone ...


17

'Trivia' is an extremely broad term. It could mean information (usually general knowledge, minor details) about almost any subject. A themed-party is normally centred around a specific subject. However, 'trivia' has become synonymous with quizzes - games or competitions in which you answer questions about general knowledge. My best guess would be that a '...


17

Commentors have noted a financial sense, but I don't think this fits this context. The sense of "making excessive buying and selling of stocks to profit from the commission" may point towards the meaning, but doesn't directly relate Las Vegas. So we look at the general meanings and find move or cause to move about vigorously. (lexico) It is ...


17

How does it look like? on its own is like asking, How does it resemble? It's meaningless without an object. How means in what way or manner; by what means. So your phrase might be used as follows: [in what way or manner:] "That hoverfly looks like a wasp." "How does it look like a wasp?" "It has yellow and black stripes." [by ...


17

"Here comes X" is the idiomatic way of drawing attention to the arrival of a person or vehicle. "Here X comes" would be understandable, but less natural. (We can say "Here he/it comes", though.) "The train comes here" wouldn't be used to greet its arrival. Speaking of its regular timetable, we might say "The train ...


16

It means, "Are you too full to eat dessert?" Here is a definition from The Free Dictionary: To refrain from eating too much so that one still has an appetite for something else later on.


16

"The past day" can mean either yesterday or the previous 24 hours. The survey that went out to students was probably something like: How many hours did you spend playing sports yesterday? But the article is talking about the survey after it happened, so if the article used "yesterday" you would think it meant your (the reader's) yesterday....


15

No. Andy North is saying that this strategy is unpleasant and worthless, just like excrement. The word "singularly" here means "unusually". Insulting people's beliefs is an unusually poor strategy for educating them. Added in light of the lively discussion below: The use of "singular" to mean "highly unusual" or "...


15

It could either be the equivalent of "yesterday" - or it could mean "the past 24 hours". The meaning could extend into the past no further than that. This usage is vague. While I will agree that the most likely intended meaning is "the past 24 hours", I would never use this where communication was critical, or where ...


15

The sense is surprising, in a positive way. That can be seen in the first sentence: It’s an exciting development. Merriam-Webster insane 4 informal : also : exceptionally good or impressive Minnesota … has blazed out to an insane start, taking an early lead in the Northwest Division.


15

The audio is right and the subtitles are wrong. Further, the expression works with or without a final verb. "The hell he is." = "He's not." (with reference to whatever was just said) "The hell he's lying." = "He's not lying." It's an expression that simply adds emphasis. It makes no literal sense in any way I can ...


14

The usage a good many is an intensifier, same as very many. Similar usages include... 1: I've got a good deal of work to do before I go home 2: They give you a good-sized mug of tea in that cafe Note this NGram showing that a great many / a great deal have consistently been (slightly) more common than the good versions for centuries. But when the referent ...


13

In literal terms, if a certain issue is "on the ballot," it means that when a voter fills out a ballot (i.e., a paper form or computer screen on which a person's vote is recorded), the voter has to mark his/her opinion regarding that issue as part of the process of voting. For example, if the legal drinking age is "on the ballot," it ...


13

You need to break this down into its component parts. A "shit strategy" means a "bad strategy", where he is using a bit of a potty mouth to emphasize how bad he thinks it is. Then when he adds an adverb "singularly shit" he is saying that this strategy is so bad, it is distinguished as being singular. That it is the one, the ...


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