New answers tagged

0

set to do something = is an idiom, set to do something means: be about to do something. Here, the conservative are about to win the election. set in English used like that means to be in a position to do something, be about to do something or be ready to do something.


0

"set to", "expected to" and "poised to" are synonyms in the following context: In 1916, Hilary Clinton lost an election that she was set to win. =In 1916, Hilary Clinton lost an election that she was expected to win. =In 1916, Hilary Clinton lost an election that she was poised to win. The three sentences have the same meaning.


0

One doesn't make orders, but place them. "Place an order for more pencils" or, if one's supplies are running low, "Restock pencils."


2

Gimp is a slur for someone with a disability or physical deformity. It has also come to mean someone incapable or incompetent. The ADHS finds usages dating from the 1920s, many of them referring to someone with a bad leg who therefore limps. However, there is an earlier (1877) adjectival usage meaning inferior, second-rate. The expression on the gimp seems ...


0

The second phrase 'to advantage of businessmen' is more frequent in the usage of media. That is why, there are many examples with it from the political newspapers and books on the Internet.


0

I would suggest something like this: Media can affect public opinion, such that election results are skewed in favour of businesses that support the media financially. Hope that helps, Alan.


1

"To sneak around with someone" means to be dating with some amount of (and motivation for) secrecy. It might be an extramarital affair, or a relationship of which some others might disapprove.


1

Philosopher Emanuel Swedenborg was much concerned with identifying "correspondences" (parallels) across different areas (religion, science, sociology,...) that might allow principles established in one field of human endeavor / thought to be usefully employed to gain a better understanding of other areas. The last sentence means Someone like Swedenborg (...


1

all the way : to the full or entire extent : as far as possible ran all the way home seated all the way in the back A more literal use in a sports cheer could mean that the player was in action from one side of the court or field "all the way" to the other side. If a player named Trent took possession of the ball from defence and brought it to ...


0

The construction, "had X been Y ..." means essentially, "X was not Y, but in an alternate universe where X was Y ..." For example, I would have ordered chicken soup if it had been on the menu. or Had proper security been in place, the prisoner would still be in his cell.


1

The first two examples might be grammatically correct, but the whole sentence isn't included so I can't answer that. Examples 3 & 4 would technically be grammatically correct, but don't sound right and convey a different idea than what you are trying to say. They all leave out pertinent information. Customarily the purchase would be introduced in one ...


0

Their special work in this case, means the "North American aborigines" appearing in spirit form. Nature of an expiation and atonement means that this is payment for something they've done. The author contends that these spirits have told him that the reason they manifest in spirit form in the presence of a medium is to atone for something. The author ...


1

You could "muddle up" the cards in an old fashioned card index because the cards in the index have to be in the right order for the index to be useful. In the case of playing cards they are supposed to be in a random order for the game to be played. You do this by "shuffling" them. "Muddling up" something is never a good thing so the difference is in the ...


1

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/wrath http://www.learnersdictionary.com/definition/enraged https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/livid You will notice, the Merriam Webster definitions seem to be very similar. In usage, I would say there is an order or strength. From weakest to strongest Livid-Enrage-Wrath Wrath is slightly archaic and ...


4

Just "shuffle" (not "shuffle up") is the idiomatic way to say you have mixed a deck of playing cards in preparation for a game or card trick: I have shuffled the cards. "Muddled up" can mean a different kind of "mixed up" - it can mean confused.


3

It's a negative connotation. He's admonishing himself for being so inelegant and clumsy. Suave: Charming, confident and elegant Crawling along the ground, snagging his coat & then banging his head was really quite the antithesis to any of those connotations. If it was Wayne's World, they'd have clarified the joke by adding "…not". It's a common ...


0

It is unusual construction, but it relates to the more widely used expression named as which is used to indicate that somebody belongs to a particular, and often prestigious, group. Albert Relf was named as one of Wisden's five cricketers of the year of 1913 - Bats, Baronets and Battle but, rather than saying he deserves to be named as one of the ...


2

He got the machine made means He caused the machine to be made without personally doing the work In the US at least, it is idiomatic but very informal. You can say the same thing without a hint of informality by saying He had the machine made or He caused the machine to be made With respect to "make", it has a very broad field of meaning, but ...


0

I would read this to mean that the real 'nett' return is 9.9% In business we talk of gross profit and nett profit. Nett profit is that which remains after the deduction of all operating costs.


1

What they really mean is 'in a part of the world where such news has lost the power to shock'. There has been conflict in the Middle East for so long that hearing of violent incidents there has become normal.


4

The other answers are correct insofar as they define “multiplex” and “conveyor belt”, but I think they’re missing the overall meaning of the metaphor. The issue with Kieślowski‘s Dekalog is that the films are of a non-standard length (about one hour each, or ten hours for the whole series). Most feature films just short of two hours long (and the vast ...


0

Deep pools means very large quantities of humour, in quite a literary-poetic tone of voice, suggesting that humour is in some way a liquid, something like a large body of water. As commenters have said, it is strange for a pool of water to float underneath something else.


13

A "conveyor belt" is literally a mechanical system that moves items along one after the other to speed up factory processes such as assembly or packaging, and therefore maximise productivity and profit. Metaphorically, the "conveyor belt" is often used to describe anything where one thing relentlessly follows another, or where a business profits from the ...


9

A 'multiplex' is a cinema with multiple screens The wording is very vague here but I think Ebert means "factory-like" with his reference to a conveyor belt. So I'd translate this sentence into His masterpiece "The Decalogue" consists of 10 one-hour films that do not fit easily in the commercial running of a large cinema. Contrast it for example ...


-1

Free your mind. As a Christian, loose yourself means, leave the things that are causing hindrance to your relationship with God.


-1

The answer to your question about potatoes is yes. The answer to your question about the idiom is yes : 'Followed by' basically means 'before'. However, 'followed by' is so litteral in indicating that the second element mentionned comes after the first one, that it can hardly be called an idiom. Consider the following sentences : The horse was walking ...


0

its more of how a list works. 1st: potatoes 2nd: bread while yes, bread did come in before potatoes in popularity, bread comes after in the list. think of it like a race. the 1st place is followed by 2nd place. does that clear things up?


0

Strictly speaking, 'within' could mean before or after the time indicated. In the context you provided though, it seems likely the speaker meant to refer only to 24 hours or less after leaving.


0

within x number of hours is the deadline. You leave at 6 p.m. I say: Call me within 24 hours. [of that time] That means: You have until the next day at the same time to call me. It only includes the time after leaving. Frankly, I see no ambiguity there at all.


-1

It's completely fine to use that. But if I were you, I'd have explored other options such as 'eased the financial burden,' etc.


2

Flightplan 2005 Script ... I was holding her hand when we took off. Please... You've got to help her. Get the lights up. Get every passenger seated. No one in the toilets. No exception. So the pilot is directing someone to make the lights brighter. Normally they would say "turn the lights on", but there are always some lights on in a plane ...


0

"That was how it was with her" has to do with her personality, how she reacts in a particular situation and I suspect that situation occurred shortly before. "What did I even do" means you did something that she is angry or sad about, but you do not understand why or you don't think what you did is bad.


0

"Doodad" is one of several nouns denoting something that either has a name unknown to the speaker or else that may not even have a name. Thus, the meaning is In the game you can poke, swipe, and slide various strange objects ... "Doodad" is similar in function to "x" in algebra: it is a temporary name for what is as yet unknown.


0

I Do not agree that the decade ended at 0h00 on 31 December 2019; In my humble opinion, the decade started 1 January 2011 and will continue until 31 December 2020; If we go back to the terms acronyms BC and AC, it implies that the 1st decade started in year 1 until year 10; and the 2nd decade started from year 11 until year 20; Fast forward to the current ...


1

Your transcript is wrong. It should read "—so there's something it's like to be me; there's something it's like to be you..." The quotation can be heard here, beginning at 51:23, The Thinking Ape: The Enigma of Human Consciousness What that means is still not obvious. Let's look to the origin of the phrase to see if it's any clearer. no matter how the ...


1

I agree with @FumbleFingers definition of 'personal nobility of spirit' as nobleness/virtue and that using this text to learn English is probably not particularly relevant. However, I differ in regards to the definition of philosophy. As I read it, the Author has asserted the following; that a person who has worked through and transcended all orthodox ...


1

The first two are imperatives (Go in!) made to sound more informal. Someone might also say "In you go!" while, for example, lifting a small child into a seat or a bath, as a friendly commentary on what they are doing. "Here you go" and "There you go" (or "There you are") are just things you say when handing something to someone. The you go part doesn't have ...


0

Thus, the rhetorical question is not a father scolding a daughter, but a lover to an intended, early or even anonymously. The singer might even be literal, asking where the intended wants the relationship to go. Time is then “stages” of romantic love: the Meeting, the sparks, the proposition, the first kiss and other things, the security of settling in to ...


0

It is ambiguous because no reference is given for comparison. For example, I might say "The low temperature yesterday was 10 below, but today it won't be THAT low." Here THAT refers clearly to yesterday's low temperature.


1

Wiktionary states: A feeling or sense. It is the same meaning as in: Apparently, this user prefers to keep an air of mystery about them.


0

"Buzzing" here is used metaphorically. "Buzz" is the sound bees make. You do not normally hear a single bee unless it is very close to you, but the buzzing is very noticeable if you are anywhere near a swarm or a hive. Moreover, if you are near a a hive on a warm sunny day, the air is thronged with flying bees. So one metaphorical use of "buzzing with X" ...


0

It is difficult to say anything without having more context. Adding more ambiguity is the use of 'your' and not 'you' (which makes the list personal). Just like I made your clothes, I made your list may work where it means that you helped someone make his/her list. But as I said, more context will clarify it further. If you get into the list, I'd add a ...


2

Using "if" as a conjunction between two adjectives means "even though": The movie was an entertaining if predictable ending to the series. In your case, it is using the metaphor "the bosom of the church" (the church seen as a place of security) but it is playing with this metaphor by describing the bosom of the Scottish church as "flattish" (as a thin ...


1

"How they differ from Docker and ScummVM" and "How they are different from Docker and ScummVM" are equally valid as section titles. Choosing between them is merely a matter of preference or style. The former seems more professional to me, because it is more direct and concise.


3

Differ is a verb. You can say X differs from Y or ask "how does X differ from Y". Difference is a noun. Things have differences from each other, or you ask what the difference is between two things. So, if you use difference, you need a verb in the sentence such as have or most often a form of be. X has a difference from Y, What is the difference ...


0

The phrase, “his own hereditary scheme of religion,” speaks to Baxter's own personal view of the religion. He has been influenced by his own family's personal views. For example, his father may have really liked a certain story of the holy book. This would have caused him to teach Baxter more about that one part. So each person in his family has ...


0

By "the larger amount of pizza" I think you mean if there's more than half of the pizza left. Pizza is usually cut into slices before being served. Let's say this particular pizza is cut into eight slices. Person B gives person A two slices. Person A eats them both and says: I ate all of the pizza you gave me. Person B then states that there are some ...


0

I must admit I am not sure I understand the question. There are some more slices if you want to eat means There are still at least two slices available for you to eat if you want to There is no necessary implication that more is left than was already eaten; that may or may not be true. I have no idea what a "continuation" of a pizza even means. A "...


4

This is not the verb to want in the sense of to wish for, but in its older sense of to be lacking in. The related noun want means the same as lack.


1

Context is everything. Two days ago, when you asked about this paragraph on ELU, you cited its source there -- A History of Spiritualism (1926) by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. It may help to know that when it came to spiritualism, psychic phenomena, and other supposed aspects of the supernatural, ACD was a credulous dupe. The first line of your excerpt reads, "...


Top 50 recent answers are included