New answers tagged

2

When your source uses the expression "dual sin", it means that the sin has a "dual" nature, in other words the sin is composed of two parts. The section of the sentence following the colon identifies (in turn) each part of the sin. It could have been written this way: "... dual sin: The sin of being furious at his mother for not satisfying him; and the ...


1

This is a figure of speech used in some novels written in the 19th century (and possibly earlier). It simply means that the writer chooses not to specify the exact year -- the year doesn't really matter -- but it was sometime in the 1700s. "The year of grace" is a variation on "The year of our Lord", both of which are an English version of the Latin Anno ...


0

The style here is rather out of date. Except as a period piece, no one writes like that currently. In fact, even when Treasure Island was first published in 1881, the style was old fashioned, because it was describing events set more than one hundred years before it was published, and the author attempted to evoke that period by his style. "I take up may ...


2

It means "I am starting to write in a year which I am not specifying which is 17xx", ie at some point in the 18th century. It was common to omit details, such as calling a person "P----" instead of the full name. It's interesting to note that in Edgar Allen Poe's The Murders in the Rue Morgue, which was published in 1841, we see the same form: "Residing in ...


2

"Gets me going" can work in the sense of getting you excited about doing something, but it's imprecise. It can also mean "makes me mad" or "wakes me up" or a number of other interpretations. I would recommend "Interacting with other people, that's what I enjoy" or "That's what motivates me."


3

"Period around now" means "starting recently and finishing soon". What "soon" and "recently" mean is a matter of context. I play tennis. (I can play tennis and I play frequently. I might not be on the tennis court now. Tennis is my sport.) I am playing tennis. (I am on the court right now. I started earlier and I expect to finish soon. For tennis "...


2

This is an example of "metonymy", using an attribute of something to stand for the thing itself. For example saying "Three suits came to the farm" meaning "Three business executives wearing suits". You should think of more examples in your own language, as this rhetorical technique is not limited to English. In this case, "baize" is the soft, usually green,...


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In most contexts, until X would be understood as meaning up to, but not including, X (alternatively, until X starts, not until X finishes), so in #A above the speaker probably didn't think Series 3 was any good, and in #B the 5th car probably was problematic. But as you imply, there is the potential for ambiguity - for example, given the assertion He's at ...


2

In this context "across" is being used loosely to mean "along the surface of" (like a boat moving across water), not necessarily from one side to the other. As it is written it doesn't sound like the exact start and end points really matter, nor does the direction (though presumably in the direction you want to throw the grenade).


1

The phrase "kick in the head" can be idiomatic, for example, "Ain't that a kick in the head" by Dean Martin. The humor in the sentence is that the narrator first gives the impression he's speaking figuratively, and then says no, the meaning is quite literal. As with many idioms, sometimes you have to figure out from context which is meant. In this case, ...


0

To speak with one's feet can also mean to take action without words. One speaks with their feet if they have a bad experience at a restaurant and, instead of verbalising to the staff, they simply never go back to that restaurant. I tend to do this. It's a tangent of conflict avoidance, I'm almost sure.


0

"Its" is a possessive pronoun, like "his". So when you say... ...at its most radical. ... the adjective following the superlative is a quality that belongs to whatever "it" refers to. It is much the same as saying: This latest book is his best work. This means that a number of works can be attributed to "him", but a particular book in question is ...


2

It means that the director Ridley Scott showed little or no interest in filmmaking during the specified time interval. From M-W: cold-eyed (adjective) cold in manner or appearance especially : coolly dispassionate And from TFD: cold-eyed (adj.) Cold-bloodedly dispassionate : a cold-eyed appraisal of the situation. So, to look at something ...


4

This is an example of come as a preposition, as many dictionaries classify it, e.g. Collins: preposition You can use come before a date, time, or event to mean when that date, time, or event arrives. For example, you can say come the spring to mean when the spring arrives. Come the election on the 20th of May, we will have to decide. He's ...


2

"well worth the ride" can be used in regard to any metaphorical journey. I have seen it used with the classic metaphor of life as a journey: A fulfilled life is well worth the ride. Such a use is not a mixed metaphor. (Not that there is anything wrong with a mixed metaphor when it communicates well. "To take arms against a sea of troubles, and by ...


1

It's not unnatural to mix metaphors. It's just a questionable writing choice. For example: If we want to get ahead we'll have to iron out the remaining bottlenecks. This is a mix of "iron out the kinks (wrinkles)" and "work through the bottlenecks", that doesn't make literal sense, but nevertheless the intent is obvious. It's better when ...


1

You need to study hard, many years; it’s a long way up, but well worth the ride I think this is another idiomatic way of saying well worth your while From collinsdictionary.com: worth your while - If an action or activity is worth someone's while, it will be helpful, useful, or enjoyable for them if they do it, even though it requires some effort


4

Without context I cannot be sure, but I think this is simply a physical description -- these trolls have arms that dangle down.


2

I'd say you were right on with your interpretation "move to the rat's hole": it is a common intro for video game/movie descriptions, to use a flowery version of: Enter the world of [theme] In this case, just a clever way to introduce the idea that you're going to be playing as a rat (enter the world of rats). Along the lines of you could start a ...


4

I think this is an "eggcorn", that is a mistake that appears often enough that some speakers think it is correct. The proper idiom is "a resounding endorsement", but the word "resounding" is quite rare, so some people might mis-hear "rounding" instead, and justify this to themselves as "the endorsement that rounds off the set of endorsements" (or something ...


0

I believe "saying that" is used in the same sense of "having said that", "that said" or "that being said". However, it is not a common phrase. I suggest you avoid it and use the more common and fossilized phrases such as those which are listed above.


2

In this sort of context, a "nod to X" is an allusion or reference to X, often an indirect or glancing reference, one that will be appreciated by someone who knows X, but may pass by someone who does not know X without being noticed. (here X is Star Wars lore). The metaphor comes from the custom of nodding one's head to a person one knows to briefly ...


1

Lore is a body of knowledge and/or tradition, that's usually built up over time. For example, the "lore of Star Wars" might include its character relationships, the planets and races, the spaceships, or even just the stories we already know from that universe. When you say a nod to something, imagine doing it in real life. You are paying homage to something,...


8

The phrase is a "take-off" Definition: (1) (2) or copy of a famous phrase: Chapter 1. Down the Rabbit Hole --- Lewis Carroll, Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (also called Alice in Wonderland) (3) (4) To "head down the rabbit hole," or "head down a rat's hole", simply means to go into it and downwards. (See definition) The meaning of "go ...


4

It's a bit of a funny one as I believe it's considered colloquial rather than "proper" English, but to head in [a direction] just means to go towards that direction. A similar question has actually been asked in the English Language & Usage SE. It's also worth noting that you can use it to mean a literal direction: Headed down the street. (...


1

Less so is a “contextual comparative” and it modifies another adjective indicating a lesser degree of the quality in question. In your context it refers to the adjective “quiet”.


1

On the third step. When you say Lolita you make three consonants, in the first two are "l" and you put your tongue on the roof of the mouth (l is a lateral approxiamant) the third and last consonant is "t", tap your tougue on your teeth (it is a dental plosive) This is meant to be the ramblings of an obsessed mind. He isn't speaking in complete or well-...


1

If you say that something is true, or applies, in principle, you are saying that provisionally based on what you know about it so far. You agree in general but have not yet considered the details. No decision has been made. In principle (1) As a general idea or plan, although the details are not yet established. ‘the government agreed in ...


-1

As a verb, to "fuck off" normally means "get away", or "get out", as a forceful way to tell someone to leave. You'll hear this often in movies and television (at least, in television programs that allow strong language). A classic example, from Monty Python's Life of Brian (1979): Brian: All right, all right. I am the Messiah! Disciples: He is! ...


-1

There are two idiomatic constructions here: "It is better" + infinitive, e.g. It is better to be safe than sorry. "You are better off" + present participle, e.g. You are better off eating just a small snack than hurrying a main meal. (And you can substitute any other personal pronoun in the second form - I, he, she, we, etc.) So sentences 1, 3, 5, ...


1

We use "as [someone] would be the first to admit" after saying something about that person, when we wish to express that the person themselves would agree with what we said (admit that it is true). Usually this is done when we are saying, kindly, something slightly negative about the person - e.g. my sister is sometimes lazy, as she would be the first to ...


1

Grammarly to the contrary not withstanding, when the construction requires an article "a few" means the same as just "few" and implies a relatively small number. Consider: In most countries copyright lasts for a set number of years beyond the life of the author, but in a few countries the law is different. In that example "a few" means a small number. ...


0

According to Grammarly: Without the article “a,” few emphasizes a small number of something. Adding the article removes the emphasis—a few means some. (You can find the same but richer answer on English Language Usage SE.) Quite a few means a fairly large number of people or things (Macmillan). This is how the things are used in English; I wouldn't ...


1

I looked up your quotations on the internet and discovered that they were from a short story written by William Saroyan which is indeed called "The Journey to Hanford." Judging from its description on Amazon, the book you have, "Great American Stories 1", contains stories that have been "adapted" for English learners by the editor C.G. Draper. C.G. Draper ...


1

Supply cache is a some sort of crate or place in which supplies, probably military supplies in this case, are kept safe for later use.


1

This is the verb "to border", meaning "to be close to". It is being used in an idiom "X bordering on Y", where X and Y are usually abstract nouns. It means that the founder of Amazon is so very blunt that he is almost confrontational.


1

A joint defense agreement means a defense agreement between at least two allied parties, for example countries. A defense agreement is a deal or a contract regarding military actions to protect the two allied parties, or collaborate on some military projects, like builiding a new fighter jet or a tank.


1

come to power [take an office which has power, presidency, premiership, dictatorship, etc.] come into power or money or something else [inherit it] This is a great example of why google is not a writer. It is so full of mistakes that sometimes, unless you are a native speaker of the language being googled in, it's useless. The normal phrase is: to come to ...


1

It's funny but as a non- native speaker i gripped the meaning of "beating the merit" on the spot. And it's also notable that i would unequivocally prefer "i feel disgust at...". I think that phenomena arise from analysing English by the non-native speakers as a kind of Maths under the conditions of lack of live english surroundings. For example, in "i feel ...


0

Here's your original sentence: Have you ever felt disgust at 'being more sociable' or 'having right connections' beating the merit? I think this is what you meant: Have you ever felt disgust when 'having the right connections' was more important than merit? I don't know anything about grammarly's rules; the sentence, as I rewrote it, is okay. ...


1

Have you ever felt disgust at 'being more sociable' or 'having right connections' beating the merit? This sentence is a little bit puzzling, mostly, for me, because of the phrase "beating the merit". But since that is not part of your question, I'll ignore that part and focus on "Have you ever felt disgust ...": There is nothing wrong, grammatically, ...


6

Yes. "Good and [adjective]" is an idiom meaning "has become very [adjective]". Meaning 12.c of good in the OED: " c. colloquial (orig. U.S.). good and: (as an intensifier of an adjective) very, exceedingly; completely." with examples from 1885.


6

Yes. "Good and [adjective]" means "quite [adjective]" or "sufficiently [adjective]": If your knife is good and sharp you should be able to slice a tomato without squashing it. Make sure the surface is good and clean, or else the decal will not stick to it. You don't need to buy any fancy, expensive cat food. When that cat is good and ...


4

I'm not familiar with Body of Lies, but I don't think "hangers" is referring to a hanging or to hangmen here. This sounds like a reference to the Crucifixion (of Jesus) to me. Ed seems to be saying that you have two choices: you can participate in a crucifixion by "hanging" on the Cross (victim), or by "nailing" someone else to it (perpetrator). I have ...


0

Number 1 is grammatically correct and idiomatic, but what would be more common, at least in U.S. English, is: I did not say anything of the kind. Number 2 is not idiomatic, at least not in U.S. English. The phrase "that kind of " typically ends with a noun describing an identifiable class and means one or some, but not all, of the items in that class. "...


-1

It probably means that you build some "chops" that you can hop on(i.e. stand on). A chop probably means a piece of wood that is partly buried in the ground, and you can step on the part that reaches into the air. So it's basically a place that you can step on. And why "hopping"? I'd guess it's because you're going to hop on those chops.


3

Entrenched can mean to be dug in. In the 1st and 2nd World War, troops that were dug in in trenches, were entrenched. These troops would be so used to being their trenches, they would hardly ever put their head above to see what was around (as it was dangerous). When talking about software users though, it usually means people who are so used to using their ...


0

Perhaps it is a combination of these two other answers. Perhaps "chops" refers to a skill. In this case "hopping chops" refers to the player's skill in hopping. "Building" refers to increasing, and so "Building hopping chops" is referring to the process of improving one's skill: learning to hop better. If someone were to ask "What is a good strategy for ...


2

On Monday I sold 15 cows and today 5 more than on Monday. This one is absolutely clear. Today I sold five more cows than fifteen, that's twenty cows today. On Monday I sold 15 cows and today 5 more. This one is absolutely unclear. It could mean "today I sold a further five cows", that's five cows today. Or it could mean the same as the first sentence, ...


2

You've misunderstood the question, perhaps because the repeated verb is elided. There weren't only five cows sold today, there were twenty. It's not "Today I sold 5 cows," it's "5 more than on Monday" With the elision: On Monday I sold 15 cows and today [I sold] 5 more [cows] than [the number of cows I sold] on Monday. How many [cows] did I sell today?


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