New answers tagged

1

'Less' in this context means 'minus' or 'before deductions'. '50 less 14' equals 36. If the monthly salary is $2,000 and you pay 10% tax, 10% pension contributions, and 10% health insurance, you get paid 70% of $2,000 in your bank account, that is $1,400. The amount before deductions (the $2,000) is often called the 'gross' amount, and the amount you ...


0

Without the preposition "for", suppression is the direct object, and one fights against something, i.e., suppression the thing being fought.


2

Yes, that's exactly what it means. The word "organically" here means in the normal course of living one's life, e.g. to develop a relationship with someone whom you happen to run into every morning when buying a cup of coffee is organic, as opposed to meeting someone because you were setup by some third party for the express purpose of y'all ...


1

It is (or should be) part of the dictionary definition of each verb (and many adjectives and nouns) what kinds of object or complement they take. It happens that hear takes a direction object: I heard him. but listen requires a "to" object: I listened to him. Similarly, see takes a direct object: Did you see the show? and watch also takes a ...


1

You are indeed on the right track—specifically, it is saying that the people responsible should be severely punished (often, as in this case, fired). The standard form of this idiom is "heads will roll," defined by Merriam Webster as used to say that people will be severely punished or will lose their jobs because of something that has happened ...


2

I take this to mean the writer is referring to both Trump opponents and Trump supporters. A lot of division was caused during Trump's time in office. No matter which side "of the line" a person was on, many people had strong feelings ("passion") one way or the other due to their own personal values ("morals").


0

It doesn't specifically refer to anyone. It's a vague statement, written on purpose to raise the very question you've asked.


2

A 'call' is a request, or a demand. The preposition that follows (on, for, to etc) depends on whether you are introducing the details of the request, or the individual or group you are making the request to. For example: Calls for better healthcare have been directed at the government. Many are calling on the government for better healthcare. There are ...


3

The phrase NAME of NOUN fame means NAME, who is famous because of doing NOUN, or NAME, whom you might know because they did NOUN. So, in this case, "the Smith Brothers of cough drop fame" means the Smith brothers, whose name you should recognize because they have something to do with cough drops. As a commentor pointed out, searching for "...


4

No, "cough drop fame" does not refer to the power of the medicine. It is providing extra context about the Smith Brothers who are famous for their brand of cough drops. From the Lexico definition for "Of _ Fame": Having a particular famous association; famous for having or being. So in general, the subject of the fame would come first in ...


0

In literary sense it means - 'using unusual words and complex construction' , as is very common in poetry and play.


0

It means poetry intended to be recited at the royal court, and which uses very elaborate language.


2

The scientist is talking about a visit that already happened, so the future tense would not be appropriate. I think your misunderstanding here is about the use of "you". He's not referring to the audience, he's using it in the general sense of "one" or "we". He's talking about what he and his colleagues were shown in Wuhan, and ...


1

I don't want to go out with you, the purpose being to study for my exams. You couldn’t really use it like this, as it’s a negative/something that you’re not doing/doesn’t exist, so it can’t really have a purpose. You could say: I’ll be staying home instead of going out with you, the purpose being to study for my exams. I’ll be honest, it’s not a phrase I ...


1

Yes, but all of them have different semantics. Being + V3 is not grammatical by itself, but you can add copula (to indicate continuous aspect version of be + V3) or use it as gerund. Basically, being + V3 is just a conjugation of be + V3. For be + V3 vs got + V3, look at this answered question: When do you use Get or Be in the passive voice?


0

In American English, it's not really condescending. It just seems like the person is speaking archaically. Wh typically use give in almost every circumstance, except a few. Legally, you can be granted things by court order or from a will. The only other time we use it is when we say "granted". Like "Granted, it was a large amount of money, but....


4

A chasm is a very deep crack or break in the ground (which in this case is presumably actually ice). Hoping across a chasm means to hop from one side of the chasm to the other. Having to jump across a chasm when crossing an ice field is a common trope in action movies set in the arctic.


2

The expression 'hit by the xxx train' is a metaphor (a figure of speech), expressing that a person is suffering sudden, severe, and irresistible effects. Just as a real train is big, heavy, and unstoppable, and can suddenly kill you if you are on the rail line when it comes, a figurative 'train' can cause you to feel something you cannot stop. Being hit by ...


6

It should be understood as un-(self-aware). The cover is the opposite of self-aware. The implication seems to be that Shadi Hamid is saying that this book and its author are unaware that they are themselves racist. I make no comment on whether Shadi Hamid is correct.


1

This is a reference to the goose that laid the golden eggs. Related idioms include "don't kill the goose that lays the golden eggs". So this line is saying people who do not respect that "P/PC Balance" thing negatively affects others in the organization and damage the resourcefulness, productivity, and/or effectiveness of the organization ...


1

They mean the same thing. "As well" might be slightly more formal than "too", and you will often hear the informal "me too". Context is important, as they could both either mean that you are going on Monday as well as on another day (ie you are going twice), or that you are going on Monday as well as somebody else who is going ...


1

We can compare I am all stomach to I am all ears "I am all ears" means that you are attentively listening whereas we can conclude "I am all stomach" to mean Very hungry and will eat whatever you give them


-1

It's slang. Perhaps "fake" slang created to give the character a distinctive way of talking. We can probably guess from the context and the usual meanings of "deal". Saying "I can deal with something" means you are able to cope with the situation. So in slang "I can deal with that. I always wanted to be a daddy" has ...


4

Think of the shape of a cupped hand, and the shape of someone's backside. The extract mentions "sexual harassment". What used to be seen as flirting is now off limits – taken as a serious offence. And "cooking books" are not recipes – it means to fiddle the company accounts. Their books (accounts) are "cooked" Direct quote from ...


33

To a native English speaker, "I am all stomach" obviously references back to the phrase "I am all ears", which means "I am ready and eager to hear what you have to say". This phrase would probably be interpreted to mean "I am ready and eager to eat what you are offering to feed me." Additionally, as BlueRaja - Danny ...


0

The first comment about song lyrics/poetry seems fairly accurate, but knowing a little bit more about the songwriter's origin and background would help clarify the extent to which it's idiomatic -- the second comment sheds some light on that re: saccharine/meaningless record industry songwriting. It's probably a matter of opinion whether this qualifies as a ...


0

Saying that someone has music in their veins has two primary meanings: The person is a skilled musician, to the point that musical skill appears to be a part of their biology. Their skill flows like blood in their veins. The person is constantly involved in musical activities. Just as blood is always flowing in their veins, musical topics are always ...


28

I think that it's a play on words similar to the idiom "I'm all ears", meaning that person "b" is eager to eat, or eager to hear or know what they are eating or going to eat.


2

Your interpretation looks correct. I think the writer wanted to avoid re-using the phrase "penny dreadful" in this sentence, and perhaps wanted to include other less "dreadful" forms of literature. However, shortly before, the writer tell us that "penny dreadfuls were aimed at young working class men." so it reasonable to ...


2

First: books-to-guns ratio. This is a neologism. It is meant to be humorous. By the way, it suggests a relationship between terrorism and writing. If you know anything about terrorism, you will see the connection. The New Zealand shooter and Anders Breivik were both writers. The Unabomber was also a writer. The four weapons behind Lauren Opal Boebert ...


2

Its not an idiom. It just means that Bin Ladin has 1 gun and many books. Boebart has 4 guns and a few books. And the author says that 1 gun: many books is better than 4 guns : few books. It is up to you to interpret why that ratio is "better" and think about the political point. That goes beyond English Learning. Theres no special or figurative ...


0

If I were greeted by anyone with "What's up?" I would immediately suspect the interrogator of hostile intent. It reeks of suspicion and hostility, or at least purveys the notion that the interrogator assumes the upper hand or a position of superiority. It may be fashionable and in vogue, but it is definitely not friendly. I would be tempted to ...


6

It means someone who goes on snowmobiles as a hobby, and uses local trails. "Backyard" literally means the garden behind the house. But metaphorically it can mean "ones local area". Thus "backyard trails" are "local paths" A warrior is literally a soldier but here it means someone who is brave, or ironically someone ...


0

Intelligence tests are usually constructed to have a mean of 100 and a standard deviation of 15 so Debra scored one standard deviation above Raymond. This gives Raymond the opportunity for a joke. It is a case of one standard deviation in the statistical sense but he may also be suggesting that his wife is abnormal in some way. Other answers have said what ...


1

Standard deviation is a statistical term. When you calculate the mean (average) you get just a single number, but you have no idea whether it means that every sample is close to that measurement, or if it's just the middle between extremes (compare to the old parable; if you have one foot in the oven and the other in the fridge, on average you're pretty ...


1

Evidently, historians do not know the exact date of the war between Sapor and the Arabs, but they are sure that it must have happened (very probably happened) soon after the treaty of 384.


1

For each hypothesis, we tried to put facts on the table, look at what we had in terms of arguments, and then make an assessment of each. It was already a big step to have Chinese colleagues assess and evaluate such a hypothesis based on what we had on the table, which was not much. Yes, lab accidents do happen around the world; they have happened in the past....


3

If the Senate had no power to convict an ex-president, this fact would tie the hands of (=prevent action by) people in the Senate, like McConnell, but not people outside the Senate, like Trump. So it must be McConnell with his hands tied.


3

It means that they are not willing to take the vaccine. On its own, "won’t get a Covid-19 vaccine" could mean that (1) they are unwilling to take the vaccine (i.e., they are skeptical and do not trust the government, scientists, process, producers, products, etc.) or that (2) they are not eligible for the vaccine (i.e., may be due to preexisting ...


1

"Will not get" merely means that you will not receive it, whether it's from your own choice or external forces.


1

It's metonymy -- the article is used as reference to the author of it, who did not comprehend Alexander.


1

As young men often do, he probably had pink skin (especially cheeks) in his youth, and golden (blond) hair; now he is not young and his skin is pale or yellow with age and his hair is grey or white. He has faded. So has the old sofa.


1

I have been meaning to write an answer for this for some time now. The productive, prolific hands of Steph Curry ... In his bag — deep — like the fries are at the bottom. The commentator is basically referring to Steph having to reach real deep in his bag of arsenal of basketball moves. Steph was putting on a show, performing at his absolute best to bring ...


1

I have never heard of the phrase "goes down a storm" before, but after reading the definition from the article you linked, it looks like they have similar meanings. However "goes down a storm" is definitely a more informal phrase to use than "goes down well". Also, "goes down a storm" appears to be a British phrase, so ...


0

As per the context, they do mean the same. In the text, which I just looked up, the speaker says "Be pleased to listen to me". In archaic English, the speaker means to ask the listener to be pleaded to listen. So it's a passive voice rendition of pleading to a person to listen: almost saying: "You have been pleaded to to listen to me". ...


3

Yes, they mean the same, but (1) is formal and old-fashioned. The passage it is taken from appears to be a translation made several hundred years ago. Another version would be "Listen to me, if you please" (meaning 'if it pleases you to do so'). Nowadays we normally just use 'Please'.


-1

This is a complex construction with an unusual result: the speaker is going to make something else rain. The only other example of this result might be in some telling of the parable of Job, where Satan makes a cloud rain to soak Job and make him curse God. The other meaning that this construction can take in the vernacular (and I don't know whether this ...


4

Yes, "taking on" variably means to absorb, to become attached to, or to begin carrying. For example, a boat "taking on water" means that water is coming into the boat. "Taking on the properties of [x]" means that properties of something have crossed over to the other. However, I do question if 'fluid' in the air is correct. ...


2

I'm quite appalled at seeing people have such discomfort in having to answer a simple question regarding sexuality. Someone mentioned people not having the "courage" for the same, which quite stuns me. I think all of them avoided answering at the presumption that this question is a joke. Maybe this is. The phrase which you asked about is vulgar. I'...


1

We often talk about artists' work being classified into periods of time which can be distinguished: for example, Picasso's "blue period", where his work mostly contained shades of blue. In this case the writer is saying that a particular painting is not very similar to that artist's other works from around the same time.


Top 50 recent answers are included