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0

In a lot of cases, yes--In a formal conversation, you either say "yes" or "no". "Um-hum" can be seen as meaning that you do not really care, but you are forcing yourself to listen.


3

The correct quote is "turning his plow point for a stone". Steinbeck is describing a man operating a horse-drawn plow ('plough' in British English). He is walking on the land, and watching where the plow blade is going. If he sees a big stone in the soil, that would damage the point of the blade, he turns the blade slightly so that it misses the stone. ...


2

There were several staff changes. And the most important one and most significant change was that of Severus Snape who was appointed headmaster.


0

I did it because I fell in love with the song the first time I heard it. Or more simply I did it because I love the song.


6

The phrase take it with a grain of salt is an English idiom meaning, "Be skeptical about it." The "it" is usually a statement heard from someone else, like a factual claim or advice. It can also mean that while the statement is mostly true, it might include some error or it might not be true when applied in every circumstance; you will need to take care and ...


1

The other answers are good and describe the overall idea, but I wanted to focus on the fragment's meaning within the entire sentence. When you restrict a studies' participants to only people within (circumscribed by) a certain culture, one should be extremely cautious against extrapolating the findings of that study to other groups. While the sentence ...


2

You're looking at two separate idioms: "Cranked out" - to produce something in large amounts. "With abandon": showing a complete lack of inhibition or restraint. Your assessment of the phrase is pretty accurate - it means they mass-produced something with very little care or concern for quality.


29

The writer is altering the well-known idiom take something with a grain of salt to get a new meaning. (I believe this is an example of metalepsis). Here’s a relevant entry for take something with a grain of salt: take (something) with a grain of salt To consider or evaluate something, such as a statement, with the understanding that it may not be ...


5

To take something with a grain of salt is an idiom meaning to hear or accept something while not completely believing it. If you take something with a grain of salt, you do not believe that it is completely accurate or true. To take something with a grain of salt


0

"Initially" means "At the beginning", so "Initially few donors seemed to agree" means "At the beginning few donors seemed to agree" etc. "at least" has several meanings but in this case it is being use to emphasise a good aspect of a bad situation. So "At least initially [something bad]" emphasises that the bad thing should not last forever. Hence "At ...


1

Die is a verb which is followed by some appropriate prepositions Die of diseases and old age and bad habits. Die from wounds and injuriries. Die in an accident Die for a great cause or for the country So in the sentence : she died of drinking 18 cans of coco-cola is correct. Here is the link which helps you. https://www.merriam-webster....


1

In this context it means also for. The sentence is making a statement that applies to two different metrics - Global Climate Change and hunger - that the countries that experience the worst problems have the fewest resources to address them. So: The countries that experience the worst climate change problems have the fewest resources to address them. AND ...


2

Habitual offenders (aka repeat offenders, or career criminals) are people who are convicted for another crime after being previously convicted. A habitual sentence is the sentence a habitual offender serves. The law varies, but usually the punishment is more severe for people who repeatedly break the law—“you can actually get double” refers to this.


3

"farce" on its own, (in this context) means a humourous play (or film, or possibly a book) But the rest of the sentence is also talking about kinds of comedy, where "slapstick" is at one end, (and by inference 'low brow', 'simple' etc.) so in this case "farce" has been qualified, upgraded even, by attaching the word "intellectual" to refer to comedy that ...


1

A candle or a light bulb is either out or lit, whereas the sun is either out or in. Per @James K (comment on the question), the British say "the sun has gone in" to mean that a cloud has come in front of it. I've never heard that in American English, but I think that is a strong indicator that the use of the word "out" in this context, even in American ...


4

She […] told me she'd take it and let me off that time an' to fink meself lucky. My reading is that she told me she'd take it and let me off that time, and she told me to think myself lucky. Essentially, she said, "You're lucky that I'm allowing you to merely give me that locket, instead of making you pay a fine."


1

As far as I can tell, it is a contraction of "The sun has come out to play", which in turn is an analogy to a child "coming out to play". Similarly, "the sun going in" is like a child going back into his house, ergo "end of fun".


7

You said this in your question: We don’t say the candle is out or the light bulb is out. Actually, we do say both of those things in English. However, they mean something different, because the word out has several meanings. In the case of a candle: out (adverb) extinguished We use this sense of out with flames or fire: The candle is out. The ...


13

"The Sun is out" is understood by analogy with out in sentences like these: Is Johnny coming out to play today? Hot jazz guitarist Ronnie Jordan's new album is out. (Source) Never did I love anything so much as that spring, when the trees burst into leaf and the primroses came out. (That is, when the primroses bloomed. Source.) The one ...


1

It's a metaphor that treats clouds like a hiding place. When you're in a hiding place, you can't be seen. You become visible when you come out of the hiding place. The word "out" is used similarly in a phrase like "Come out wherever you are", which would be said when playing Hide and Seek and admitting defeat.


0

Unfortunately, it's difficult to tell from this context (reading slide presentations without the corresponding audio is usually not a good way of understanding anything), but I suspect that what was actually intended was actually definition #2 from the dictionary entry you linked to: if something you do pays off, it is successful or has a good result In ...


19

That's a good question, and for many questions like this, there may not really be a single, known answer about how it came about, or why people say something one way but something similar a different way (known as "idiomatic speech"). Nevertheless, here's my opinion or educated guess: Unlike other light sources, the sun is, first of all, something that's ...


0

'Crash-bang-wallop' is a slightly old-fashioned, mainly British dramatic interjection. An interjection is one or more words inserted between other words to convey drama or emphasis. For example, 'bang!' used here: The car crashed into a tree, then - bang! - it exploded. In a similar way, I can say: I was sitting watching the TV, when - crash-bang-...


19

be game To be willing to do something. Sure, I'm game to go to the mall. Vince is game to play basketball—why don't you go to the park with him? (TFD) I assume you can understand equally. I couldn't quickly find a definition for slip into, but I see it as a figurative extension of the following: slip intransitive verb 5 : to get speedily ...


2

It means stakes in the sense of “what’s at stake” (see “at stake” in your dictionary link) or risks, see here: https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/stakes I haven’t heard “absolute stakes” used before. I think they mean “absolute” in the sense of “total”.


3

One meaning of the word "stake" is a value, usually a monetary value. So a "stakeholder" is someone who has something of value. A very common employment of the word is to represent a value that is at risk. If you place a bet, the amount that you may lose is your stake in the outcome. So the sense of this passage is that what is being risked is not the ...


1

A schedule is rather more than just fixing a date. It's more appropriate for a series of events, such as a conference with registration, talks, meals etc. If you are choosing a date for some event, that's not a schedule, its just, well, a date. Let's fix a date for the party. Although more idiomatic (for me) would be Let's set a date for the party.


-1

I think it's a brilliant title or saying. What its original translation or meaning was is not that important to me. In relation to the movie what it says to me is that: There are good people in the world There are bad people in the world but also - and not to be underestimated - there are ugly people. Good is good, bad is bad, but bad doesn't ...


0

A person said something about how people should live. The second person said, "that advice is good for many different occupations and many different positions within society". In short, the second person believes it is general advice that applies (or provides benefit) to most people without regard to their job or status. Your first definition is good. ...


2

I feel like the expression is more often get a hold of (oneself): get a hold on/of (oneself) get a hold on/of (oneself) To begin to control one's reactions or emotions after not having done so previously. After losing her job, Pam needed to calm down and get a hold on herself in order to drive home safely. You're not going to be able to think ...


3

“Shut up here” is a participle phrase, since “shut” is also the past participle of the verb “shut“. Indeed it means confined. Someone has shut him up in Hogwarts or wherever he is, so he has been shut up there. https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/shut_up


1

The meaning "defend against" is being used here. The theories in question are disproved by Horn's research, so they cannot "stand up to" said research.


1

The expression is a metaphor. The writer appears to be comparing the pleasure that an apology from the NBA brings (for somebody's comment) to the pleasure that snuff takers get from a good sniff of quality snuff. Both make people feel better. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snuff_(tobacco)


1

I would’ve been late if my mom hadn't woken me up on time. The sentence above is correct. It's a third conditional. We use third conditionals talking about unreal situations in the past. "In fact, I wasn't late because my mom had woken me up. But I would have been late if she hadn't woken me up." You can read more about conditionals here. Since you are ...


0

This phrase, "assisting delivery of construction programs", is not grammatically correct. One would normally use is or with, and either with or without an article: "assisting in the delivery of construction programs"; "assisting with the delivery of construction programs"; or "assisting in delivery of construction programs" "assisting with delivery of ...


0

It's a lovely turn of phrase, invented by the author but (as noted in the comment by @Hellion below) with a biblical reference. The phrase signifies the author's wishful thinking about a world free of violence and aggression. In that imaginary world, a gentle little lamb could play safely in a meadow while a big lion snoozed nearby, with no intention ...


6

'At best' is used here to say that, for campaigners, there are a range of possible outcomes, none good, from an 'emotional burst', and that being counterproductive is the least bad one. If you have an electric shock, you will be startled and surprised at best. Less good outcomes could be that you are slightly injured, badly injured, or, at worst, killed. ...


1

Imagine that brambles have grown from the sides of the path so that they partly cover the path. The word back in this sentence means that the frontier, or border, of the brambles should recede as a result of plucking them, so the brambles no longer cover the path. Consequently, the speaker will be able to walk along the path without stepping on brambles. ...


2

Her ride didn't show. This is a less common variant of the following: Her ride didn't show up. From the definition of the intransitive sense of the verbal phrase show up: [Merriam-Webster] 1 a : ARRIVE, APPEAR // showed up late for his own wedding // Hundreds of tourists showed up, wearing bright sweaters, even though it was warm. — Tony ...


0

It can't have the same meaning. If it did, then you could use either one. But you can't: ✔ It seemed the war had ended. ✘ It as though the war had ended. The term as though is defined as a conjunction by Merriam-Webster: : as if // the applause was so great it was as though the toddler's dance class had been the Bolshoi Ballet In the case of ...


1

According to the Merriam-Webster dictionary. one meaning of roll up is to increase or acquire by successive accumulations. But its hard to connect the phrase with MW's definition. A second meaning of the verbal phrase is to reduce something (e.g., roll up the maps, roll up the papers). From Collins If you roll up your sleeves or trouser legs, you ...


2

ABBA (written thus) was a Swedish pop music group in the 1970s, famous world-wide. "Don't go [doing something]" is an idiomatic way of strongly suggesting that the listener does not do something. "Don't go wasting your emotion" is equivalent to "Don't waste your emotion".


4

I think you have missed the basic meaning of shaking the head in British (and other cultures) that it means emphatically no. There are cultural differences in a head-shake as indicated in Wikipedia and notes differences in India and South Eastern Europe. Also in British culture a nod means yes, but this is also variable by geography. The emphatic no ...


7

As another answer says, "all you like" (or "all you want", or "all you please") means: It doesn't matter how much you do something... So, in a context like: "Shake your head all you like, Elphias! You were at Ariana's funeral, were you not?" that means roughly the same as: "No matter how much you shake your head, Elphias, you can't deny you ...


3

The expression 'all you like' can be used in connection with an action (by a listener), which the speaker wishes to imply is pointless, or will not have any effect on something the speaker knows, believes, or intends. Elphias is, I think, shaking his head in disbelief at what Auntie Muriel is saying.


0

What this means is that the person who is talking is giving you important facts. He is discussing something that he thinks is important. He has his own beliefs and opinions, but he does not want to just tell you to believe him based on his side of the story. That "belief" won't be rock-solid. He is telling you that you don't have to trust what he is saying,...


0

To pronounce can mean "Declare or announce in a formal or solemn way". A man who has been shot may be pronounced dead by the police. His attacker may later appear in court and at the end of the trial the judge might pronounce his verdict and pronounce sentence: he might impose a prison sentence or pronounce the death sentence. He says, Dangerous Liaisons ...


0

That is an interesting question. I'm a native UK English speaker and I cannot discern any fundamental difference in meaning in these sentences whether or not "as though" is included. It does, somehow, seem more appropriate to use "as though" in the first case, It seemed as though the war had ended. does feel better that It seemed the war had ended. ...


-1

I have assessed this question with a focus on British English because your quotation is from the British Prime Minister. I did initially think you had either misheard the word rounding, or that Prime Minister Boris Johnson from whom you were quoting had made a characteristic gaffe: We are committed to rounding up the evil county lines drugs gangs. This ...


3

It is an idiom, and somewhat old-fashioned but still used. An example I found in a Google search: There is often way too much talk of building for the future but what about building for the now? If you Google the expression you'll find more examples. It is just a way of differentiating between "now" as a temporary state and "now" as a concept of current ...


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