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2 votes

be at ease and rest assured when the subject is not "you"

Your rest assured sentence isn’t wrong, but neither does it feel idiomatic, especially if the people referred to don’t include the listener. Be at ease is not a collocation that is often used. Instead,...
Paul Tanenbaum's user avatar
1 vote

be at ease and rest assured when the subject is not "you"

Yes, you can say "rest assured" with the person receiving the assurance being someone other than "you". "I can rest assured ..." "Sally can rest assured ..." ...
Jay's user avatar
  • 66.8k
0 votes

As matters stand - meaning

The phrase as matters stand can be used when we're discussing a particular situation or circumstance. This site gives several synonyms including "at present", "currently", "...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
3 votes

as having over / for having over – are both correct? Do the sentences mean the same?

To me, the likely meanings / contexts are different... 1: The article was flagged as [being X] ... implies flagging = labeling in the context of a classification exercise. Every article is assigned ...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
-2 votes

as having over / for having over – are both correct? Do the sentences mean the same?

They are both correct but with different meanings. "as having" - A flag was set which signals that the article has over 50% AI content. The fact that this flag is set means that it has ...
timchessish's user avatar
  • 1,891
2 votes

as having over / for having over – are both correct? Do the sentences mean the same?

I would say that (1) is more idiomatic. You flag something (mark it for attention) as having (because it has) a certain quality. You flag something for a particular person's attention rather than for ...
Kate Bunting's user avatar
  • 55.6k
1 vote

What does "so much as" here mean?

These notes build on the excellent answer from @TimR. The theological setting is that Christian groups of all types carry out the same set of important rituals, such as worship, prayer, baptism, ...
Peter Kirkpatrick's user avatar
2 votes

What does "so much as" here mean?

You can replace "so much as" there with "but rather" -- though the author is hedging a little when saying "so much as". To paraphrase so much as in this not X so much as ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 127k
2 votes

What is "real men"?

"Real men" is a phrase commonly used to discuss characteristics of masculinity. As such it is gender specific: it refers to males only. Depending on context it may be used both seriously and ...
Peter Kirkpatrick's user avatar
2 votes

What does "hope was all" represent in "Hope was all we could offer from our vantage point in Ketchum Hall"?

The comment above answers this correctly. One could rephrase the sentence as "We could offer only hope..." or "We could offer nothing more than hope". The sense is that we have no ...
Jim Davis's user avatar
  • 121
0 votes

What is the meaning of "they've got life beat."?

The underlying structure of "they've got life beat" is [ "get" + object + adjective ], meaning to cause object to be in an adjective state. Here's another example: I've got the ...
gotube's user avatar
  • 50.9k
-1 votes

What is the meaning of "they've got life beat."?

"I think the word beat is used as [speech category] It is idiomatic spoken slang, so there is really no meaningful grammar category. It's dangerous to say "it means 'beaten'" (as in a ...
Fattie's user avatar
  • 1,237
0 votes

"considered to be" and "considered as"

There is a difference between considered to be and considered as. If I say, for example, that I consider birds to be dinosaurs, then I am expressing my opinion that birds are dinosaurs. If I say that ...
Peter's user avatar
  • 7,057
8 votes

What is the meaning of "they've got life beat."?

"Beat" could be "beaten" in this example. And "got life beat" is a get-passive. Putting this together we can rephrase in an active voice, and with the relative clause ...
James K's user avatar
  • 223k
2 votes

The meaning of "I don’t want to look, but let’s see"

The speaker is using the word proverbial loosely there to mean something like "typical" or "usual" or "common". He is referring to the combination of dread —the fearing ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 127k
2 votes
Accepted

meaning of the phrase "must not be"

You are right. I would guess that this has been written by a speaker of a language such as German, where "Ich muss nicht" means "I don't have to", not "I must not".
Colin Fine's user avatar
  • 75.9k
0 votes

Why add the word "solid" to the verb "freeze"? E.g., "The clothes froze solid on the washing line." Does the meaning change if we remove "solid"?

The other answers have thoroughly covered the difference between partially freezing and freezing solid, but with the clothes example my mind immediately jumped to freezing onto something. If you said &...
aantia's user avatar
  • 361
2 votes
Accepted

Can "length of stay" refers to "the length of time somebody visits somewhere"?

Yes, you are correct. Length of stay is commonly used in the hotel/resort industry to describe how long a guest's reservation is. It is also common in fields like customs/boarder control to talk about ...
Friendly Racoon's user avatar
0 votes

is there a difference between "circle up" and "circle around"?

No, that's not correct at all. Circle Up Circle up means "form a circle." It is an instruction, often given by a leader to a group of people. The group will then form a circle with their ...
Friendly Racoon's user avatar
4 votes

Why add the word "solid" to the verb "freeze"? E.g., "The clothes froze solid on the washing line." Does the meaning change if we remove "solid"?

The way I'm used to using and hearing the phrase (in America) is that "frozen solid" refers to and re-emphasizes the rigidity of the substance, not its temperature. For example, if a river ...
Jamin Grey's user avatar
2 votes

Difference between "play in defense", "play on defense" and "play defense"

I'm American and not familiar with the usage in example (1), but in American usage examples (2) and (3) are essentially equivalent, and in my experience example (3) is more common. Example (2) "...
The Photon's user avatar
  • 10.4k
16 votes

Why add the word "solid" to the verb "freeze"? E.g., "The clothes froze solid on the washing line." Does the meaning change if we remove "solid"?

Firstly, to freeze doesn't only mean to change from a liquid to solid state due to a temperature change. To freeze also means for something to get stuck, or for something or someone to stop moving. ...
Kaz's user avatar
  • 6,726
-6 votes

Why add the word "solid" to the verb "freeze"? E.g., "The clothes froze solid on the washing line." Does the meaning change if we remove "solid"?

Froze is a verb (past tense). Solid is an adverb. It's like saying "She ran quickly" or "He waved excitedly" or "He died happily".
Fattie's user avatar
  • 1,237
3 votes

What does "Knew that soon you'd want to leave the nest" mean?

You have not parsed the sentence correctly. The express is "I know that ...." the word "that" doesn't mean very. It is a marker of a subordinate clause. The subordinate clause ...
James K's user avatar
  • 223k
23 votes

Why add the word "solid" to the verb "freeze"? E.g., "The clothes froze solid on the washing line." Does the meaning change if we remove "solid"?

Sometimes a body of water is described as frozen when only the surface is ice, but there is liquid water beneath. The term frozen solid specifies that the entire body of water has become ice; there is ...
Peter's user avatar
  • 7,057
34 votes

Why add the word "solid" to the verb "freeze"? E.g., "The clothes froze solid on the washing line." Does the meaning change if we remove "solid"?

There are different degrees of freezing. A light frost is different from a frost that penetrates through something. So saying "froze solid" you mean that the freezing was complete and ...
James K's user avatar
  • 223k
0 votes

What does "a receipt for the money" mean?

Please note: I am only responding in this manner because I do not have the reputation to comment. I 100% agree with @gotube's answer. As to a general "rule" for those looking to improve ...
JustKillMe's user avatar
11 votes

What does "a receipt for the money" mean?

In the context of a receipt, the preposition "for" indicates what the receipt acknowledges the receipt of. If someone gives you $10 and you give them either a machine-printed slip of paper ...
gotube's user avatar
  • 50.9k
8 votes
Accepted

"A pebble of disappointment plummets the length of him"

This is a metaphor and poetic language. You are right that it's not an idiom you will likely see anywhere else. Most simply, the author means that he is disappointed. However, he is describing the ...
Friendly Racoon's user avatar

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