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0

Of course, trying to interpret contemporary pop song lyrics must involve a certain amount of guesswork, but the line could mean "make a joint from a cigar and then watch me closely". A 'Backwood' is a US brand of cigar, popular among smokers of marijuana in that language zone for use as the basis for rolling a 'blunt' (a hollowed-out cigar filled with ...


0

There is such a thing as a cold case. Cold cases have not yet been solved by police and become "shelved" (filed away for reference in case new information is found. Then, the case is re-opened.) When cases become cold, any evidence that is found is kept on file in the police evidence room for cold cases. As English loves to make verbs of just about anything,...


0

They mean the same. The usual phrasing is "I don't have anything." You might use "I have nothing" to be more emphatic or to add variation to your writing. You can add adverbs, for example "I have absolutely nothing". You couldn't do this with "I don't have anything."


2

I found another version of the lyrics, which has 'All good devils set me free', which makes slightly more sense: bad devils torment me in hell, but good devils set me free (which means they're not really devils). Where did you get these lyrics? Online versions of song lyrics are sometimes of variable quality.


1

In short, "whose" is the couple, and "trust" is a noun. In detail: Rephrase the sentence. Add commas (for clarity): The thought of the unwary couple, whose trust he has carefully cultivated, excites his blood-lust to a fever pitch, and he can barely hold back, these last seconds, before climbing out of the coffin, to seek his prey. Remember that "...


5

If we assume the author didn't make a mistake here, then it feels to me like a reference to silk's "slipperiness" - imagine two pieces of silk cloth sliding over each other: fast and friction-less.


4

It may not be a common metaphor, but it makes perfect sense if you know what shot silk is - basically, it is silk fabric made with different colored warp and weft threads, so that every slight movement of the cloth changes the patterns of color you see. Frank made a rapid shift from making a reference to a dirty joke about a princess, to retelling the story ...


1

Fit to print simply means suitable or appropriate for printing. News might not be fit to print because it is pointlessly scurrilous, or unsubstantiated, or not of interest to anyone, or puerile. It implies being selective as to what is published, but selective in a very principled way.


3

Actually, the meaning of "He may not come today" is ambiguous, at least when written. You would have to use context to understand what is meant. When spoken, there would normally be a different intonation, depending on what the speaker intends to say. If there is no particular emphasis, or if the emphasis is slightly on "may" the meaning is, "The ...


8

It is almost certainly a mistake, as the expression "quick as silk" not only makes no sense (silk has no speed) but it cannot be found anywhere else. This is not strictly a "malapropism", as it is unlikely one would hear "flash" and think it was "silk". A malapropism is when someone gets an idiom wrong by substituting a similar sounding word, eg "he danced ...


17

I think the cited usage is something of a malapropism / mixed metaphor. It should be one of either... switching, [as] quick as a flash [to something else] OR switching, [as] smooth as silk [to something else] Note that both the above expressions occur many times in Google Books (which I've linked to). But there are virtually no instances of ...


2

is its own is not a phrase. its own clearly definable concept is a noun phrase, the complement of is. Its own here means "standing on its own, not requiring reference to something else" rather than "belonging to itself".


0

"To levy a fine" is a standard legal phrase meaning "to asses a fine" or "to impose a fine", that is for a court or other legal authority to require a person (or a business or organization) to pay a sum of money as a penalty. It does not now mean "to commence and carry on a suit for assuring the title to land or tenements." and I do not believe that it ...


0

Elliptical, referring to language, means with parts missing. There's a lot of words get missed out, according to some formal grammars, in normal English speech. We miss out repeated subjects, or even subjects and verbs, or just verbs. We can have several subjects and/or several verbs with just one object. That's all ways of being elliptical in terms of ...


0

It is not a common phrase, nor would it be funny in any typical setting. In the skit, I think people are laughing specifically because it is just such a goofy and random phrase that doesn't fit the situation at all. And it's a weird character too, saying weird things, that makes the whole thing funny. Of course with any humor, many people may not find this ...


0

"tête-à-tête" is taken from French, and it literally means "head-to-head", better translated to English: "face-to-face". It is used for the discussion of two persons, when they concentrate their attention to each other (unlike having a casual conversation while each of the persons is concentrated on some other activity). Usually is a private conversation, ...


1

The character of Kevin Roberts is not a representation of a real person, just a 'typical' annoying person from the 1980s (we get this from the oversized-cellphone, fashion and the music he dances to). The joke of the entire sketch is that the FBI shooting range is training cadets to quickly distinguish "good guys" from "bad guys", but you have annoying ...


3

"Underneath it" refers to the noun-phrase "a tree by the lake". If the gravel were underneath the lake, then nobody would be able to see it, and the sunlight would find it hard to make shadows dance on it.


0

"Suggests after the event" means "we're looking back at the situation." It's different from trying to see what's going on during the events. It's also "suggests," which indicates that when looking back they aren't certain of everything. the development of a society sometimes suggests after the event a pattern not in the minds of its creators We can ...


3

You have to consider the whole phrase: a tomato/tomahto word. In the USA, some people pronounce the word 'tomato' so that the 'a' vowel is said like the 'a' in plate, date, late, etc, and others pronounce it like the 'a' in the southern British pronunciation of father, past, last, etc, which is often represented in American writing as 'ah'. A tomayto/...


0

I don't know the writer in question, but in essence it seems to be saying that the author's writing can be so terse, brief or succinct as to be provocative. "Provocatively" is usually used in two contexts ... provoking desire, usually sexual, and provoking anger or irritation. We can confidently assume it is the latter here. So ... The text is so terse ...


1

Literary means connected with literature. Servility, as you rightly mentioned, is the eagerness to serve and please someone, which in itself portrays negativity. Hence, the phrase literary servility, refers to producing literature which is too eager to serve (in this case, serve the establishment or the ruling party). Conclusively, Zamyatin didn't respect ...


1

It would've been better if you wrote: "Jesse takes the train on Sunday morning." Here's a quick recap on how to use prepositions in case you don't remember it anymore.


1

"Persistently high levels of unemployment" emphasizes the high level of unemployment, since "persistently" is modifying "high"." Even though it also indicates time, the implication is that the "height" of the unemployment is the problem, particularly because the noun is the level of unemployment. In contrast, "prolonged periods of high unemployment" ...


0

That phrase was specifically from episode 1 of the show Man seeking Woman and for 3 seasons the character that said it said smashing to mean having sex so, no, it doesn't have any other meaning. Watch the show and you will know what i mean.


1

According to the dictionary, be quits means: "to not owe money to someone or to each other now" If you pay for my ticket then we will be quits will then mean that the subject in the sentence will not owe money to the speaker if he pays for his ticket.


0

Such a worker is a cashier: [Merriam-Webster] c : an employee (as in a store) who handles monetary transactions Although cashier used to be used for more than just people in front of a cash register, that's the modern usage for those employed in the retail industry who ring in sales. For people who work in banks, for instance, the word teller is more ...


2

In most scenarios like this, "come out with" is reserved for occasions when the product is released into the open market. "Come up with" is usually when something is discovered/invented. For example, Disney came up with the idea for their movie "The Incredibles 2" long before they came out with it (released it).


3

Unfortunately, English is a language of obfuscation and prepositions. While the prepositions purport to clarify, the clarification is only to the natives! A short story might help: Chuck's sister came up with the idea of having a surprise party at the lake, but, being a secret from Chuck, we couldn't come out with it, until we had the party! Here's ...


11

Both could apply depending on context. To "come up with" a new product implies that you have created or invented a new thing, regardless of whether it's actually available for purchase. The engineers at Wilson Widgets have come up with a new kind of widget that should make them millions once it's finished. To "come out with" a new product means that the ...


28

To come up with something is to invent it, think of it, or create it. "That's a great idea, how did you come up with it?" To come out with something, in that context (others are quite different) is to announce it. For the product to come out is for it to be released. Acme Co surprised everyone when they came out with their latest offering, dehydrated ...


1

"Play out" in that sentence means "happens". Play out (intransitive) to happen or turn out Let's wait and see how things play out Play out


1

This is a hard one for non-native speakers, but one that a native speaker would not even question. Basically, adding out to a verb adds the sense of doing something to completion: out adv thoroughly; completely; entirely: the children tired me out TFD Online To "play something out" means to bring that thing to completion. Say you're playing a game ...


2

"One" is a pronoun substituting for "scene". The entire sentence is actually two complete sentences, separated by a comma. The first part: It's a common scene should be self-explanatory. The second part can be rephrased: It's a scene playing out (all over). "Playing out" is an idiomatic expression that references "scene", as in a stage performance....


2

Milling is defined as: moving around in a large group, with no particular purpose, or in no particular direction In this context, JKR must've intended to convey that the students were roaming around, probability with no particular intention; or rather to kill time.


0

In your context, "contribute to" and "lead to" are only partial synonyms. If hard work "leads to" success, that hard work has very strong influence and there are no (many) obstacles to prevent success. If hard work "contributes to" success, that hard work has only limited influence and there can be (several) obstacles to prevent success. So in the case of ...


2

The phrases "back and forth" and "backward and forward" mean basically the same thing. The phrase "back and forward" seems to be an inconsistent combination of the two phrases. This particular phraseology may have been unintentional, as this seems to be the only time in the seven books that the author used it. Throughout the rest of the books, "backward and ...


0

The sentence is incomplete because you haven't finished talking about the main subject—the student. You actually need to have two verbs, each of which will be formed based on its own subject. There are various possibilities, involving one or more students and there being one or more phones owned by those students: One of the students [whose mobile was ...


1

The last part, It is but feeble if it does not see so far as to know this. could be rephrased as: Reason is weak if it not does realize that there is an infinity of things which are beyond it. By the way, if you find the original French sentence and use Google Translate, the result is easy to understand and, surprisingly, pretty accurate (you just ...


0

One of the students [whose mobile is missing] is very upset. Your example was just a noun phrase, so I've added the predicate "is very upset" to produce a complete sentence. You've used singular "mobile" , so I'll assume that just one mobile is missing. The one of x who construction often causes confusion since either singular or plural agreement is ...


2

Pay per use suggests that each 'use' is a discrete instance. You use it once, you use it twice. Instances of use are countable, essentially. Pay by use is reasonably well attested, though more popular recently in the specific case of cloud computing is pay by usage. This suggests that use is a volume rather than a number (though there's a number somewhere ...


0

What is missing in this sentence? Is it singular, or plural? If it is singular, then you need is missing, and if it is plural, you want are missing. As you have written it, the thing that is missing is mobile, so you must have is missing. Whether you should be saying mobile is or mobiles are is a whole other question, and one that I've definitely known ...


1

Whatever the case, the verb relates to the mobile, not the students. So since the student is only missing one mobile, you would use the singular here.


1

As mentioned by you in the comment, the source of the text in question seems to be arguing in the favor of online degree programs. Ergo, "Last then" simply refers to the fact that the sentence that follows it is the last point the writer of the text is making.


7

I think you are parsing the phrase wrong, if you think that something is embedded in a whale. It should be read as "embedded in (a whale of a bill)". As Michael Harvey pointed out, "a whale of a X" is a colloquial expression for "a very large X". So the phrase just says that the provision is embedded in a very large bill.


6

"Whale" here is a metaphor. A metaphor states that one thing is another thing. It equates those two things not because they actually are the same, but for the sake of comparison or symbolism. A whale is a large marine mammal, and the blue whale is the largest of all marine mammals. Also whales eat smaller creatures. To call something a "whale" of a thing is ...


15

If you look up disappear in the dictionary, you'll see that it has a transitive meaning: to cause the disappearance of This is exactly the meaning that's being used in the sentence you quote: We got the list of the people he caused the disappearance of. Usually, this transitive use of disappear, especially disappearing other people, has very sinister ...


2

It's another way to phrase something like: Out of everyone in the room, he alone had remained silent so far. Ngram suggests this is not a very common phrase, at least relative to "out of everyone". I can't say why Rowling chose to use it instead of the more common version, but it's a legitimate expression.


1

It’s a made-up word; it makes little sense; apparently, it’s used as a rhyme for something. Nicki Minaj raps this part, and such meaningless words may help to control the flow.


11

When we say a ship is 'carrying a high sea" we mean that the sea in which it is sailing is very rough, with waves that are large enough to poop the ship (verb, meaning to break over the stern of the ship causing it to capsize, or nearly do so).


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