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2

That example sentence, as a native speaker, doesn't quite flow (beyond the it's typo). "It strikes me" is a metaphoric phrase where the an idea comes to your mind suddenly and without warning, like being unexpectedly struck by the thought as if it were a projectile. Seeing some clouds looming in the distance and assuming future rain doesn't really seem to ...


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The phrasal verb to run into has several possible meanings, one of which is "to accidentally hit or collide with something." This applied to any tense of the verb, not just the past. The verb to run does not mean "to crash" except in this particular construction with into. If you follow the link above, you'll see that even with into, it doesn't always mean ...


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As a native speaker I don't think of this as a special meaning of run. But into still means into. You can run into a tree. You can walk into a wall. You can fall into a hole. You can fly into a mountain. All of these involve a collision. But I'd consider that a sense of the meaning of into, not special meanings of the different verbs used with it.


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All three sentences seem correct to me, or at least, idiomatic. The idiom there's more to X than Y essentially means X is not solely made up of Y, but has other "ingredients": a very literal example being "there's more to cake than eggs". Yes, there are eggs in cake, but eggs alone do not make cake, there is also flour and so on. It tends to be used not ...


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The phrase predates the movie. I lived in NYC 1979-1990 and the expression was in common parlance during that period so its roots are probably much older. It was used as a mild insult or rebuke, often in traffic confrontations and "Jersey" was pronounced with an exaggerated "Joyzee" accent. Its meaning was to infer that anyone who exhibited unsofisticated ...


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In "The walking is not at all good", 'at all' is emphasising on 'not' then the adjective is put, giving a meaning that something is not completely good. On the other hand, in "The walking is not good at all." 'at all' is put after the whole part of sense making sentence. well, I'm not a native English speaker and the idea only belongs in my mind. Thank ...


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Since past participles can function as adjectives, every passive construction can be seen as the verb "to be" and a predicate adjective in the form of a past participle. The apple is red: red is a predicate adjective. The apple is carried: is carried is a passive construction, and carried is a participial predicate adjective. Much has been made in the ...


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x were carried by y is a passive structure. The packages were carried by the girls into the house. Compared to: The girls carried the packages into the house. If the alluvium is carried, it cannot be so far removed from the word canals: Sample: low alluvium of Babylonia, a region of great fertility, intersected by numerous canals, which in some places ...


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"Were carried" is a passive structure in your context. Adjectives modify the nouns, which is not the case here. "Canals were carried" really sounds odd as mentioned in the comment. For example, "canals were placed," is more understandable.


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See definition (2) of caught up in from Merriam-Webster: excited about something and having trouble thinking about anything else Everyone was caught up in the excitement. Try not to get too caught up in the moment.


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This has to do with "warping of space-time". The easiest real-world corollary would be if you were to place a heavy ball on a blanket. The ball warps (changes the shape) of the blanket, bringing parts to different distances to each other from where they were before. You can see a graphical representation of the warping effect caused by massive objects here, ...


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I think both are the same. But I think a “good idea” is more proper.


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The second "I hardly defended" is good English and it means only did a little bit of work in defending the case. The first example is never used. It is bad English. It doesn't mean anything much, in particular, it doesn't mean "I defended hard" or "vigorously" It doesn't mean "I did a lot of work in defending the case." "Hardly" hasn't meant "with great ...


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"To break bread with someone" means "To eat with someone", which represents that the two people who are having a meal together, are actually "friends" or "allies". They wouldn't be eating together if they were enemies. And this phrase from Metallica is a beautiful example of where this idiom can be used. He simply wants to take revenge, but he's delivering ...


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That seems to be from lyrics by a song by Metallica. There is an idiom in English, "to break bread with", which means to eat with someone. Merriam-Webster "break" break bread : to dine together The lyrics of that song seem to try to extend that idiom, trying to mean, somehow, that "I will eat revenge along with my bread", or maybe "eat in the ...


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Yes, it is "around," and the reason for the apostrophe is that it's a contraction. ('Tis and 'twas also both get the initial apostrophe , though they are old-fashioned.)


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I am a native speaker and it isn't clear to me, so I presume it is poorly written. My guess would be that earth is in contrast to heavenly and metaphysical realms so it means that the media is the real world embodiment of the metaphysical ideal of Freedom of Speech. The phrase “unanswered power” seems to lack a formal definition, but has been used before in ...


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A twin is one of two. Hence the two twins refers to two people. A set of twins refers to a pair of two people. Each in the pair is a twin. My twin is the person I am twinned with. In other words, the other person in the pair of twins. Twin therefore carries the notion of having a counterpart, a twin being one of two.


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Cambridge dictionary defines 'twin' as "either of two children born to the same mother on the same occasion". Therefore, 'twin' means the individual, not the pair. He is a twin. They are the twins. If you say : There are two twins. You mean there are two children who are twins. "Two twins" doesn't refer to four children. But we should keep in ...


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The word "period" here means the same as "full stop", it is the punctuation that ends a sentence. Person A says "[It is a] Nice night for a walk." Person B says "[It is a] Nice night ." But to emphasise this, B speaks the punctuation Example: — I think a greyhound is good dog for racing. — I think a greyhound is a good dog period. They are ...


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From Cambridge dictionary: perceive: to come to an opinion about something, or have a belief about something As you probably have seen before, the past participle of many verbs such as "perceive" can be used as the attributive adjectives. Here, the "perceived difficulty" means the level of difficulty that you imagine in your mind regarding the task at ...


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The answer is right there in the video: "Astronomy is a humbling enterprise. After all, every time we make a new discovery, we find ourselves further removed from importance." American Heritage Dictionary "humble" 1 "1. Marked by meekness or modesty in behavior, attitude, or spirit; not arrogant or prideful." That is an antonym of "self-important". ...


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The relevant definition of "friction" is here: American Heritage Dictionary (2) Conflict, as between persons having dissimilar ideas or interests; clash. "Points of friction" means individual instances or examples of such conflict.


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She thinks that there are problems with the rules -- these are her concerns. She has done things to try hard to persuade people to fix those problems -- this is pressing them.


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The original meaning of "native" means "born in this country/region" When applied to software, it means "created for this hardware" So software that is native to the iPhone was originally written to run on an iPhone, and isn't adapted or ported from some other system. Native software will make often better use of hardware and the interface will seem more ...


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Take your second example first. It uses the indefinite pronoun one to mean a person, any person. It's a slightly less personal way of saying you when illustrating a point. This sentence is correct. One is followed naturally by oneself in the sense that any person should look after himself/herself/themselves in these circumstances. It's a general statement ...


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'...as if I were a spirit, and he could not tell whether it was a good spirit or an evil one.'


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The leopard, waiting to pounce, is thinking only of what the meat will taste like and not paying attention at all to what is going on around it.


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X "comes as" Y means, "X occurs at the same time as Y," or "X comes together with Y." This is a conjunction.


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bring somebody by That is an idiom. What brings you by? = What caused you to come here, to come by come by= come to a place, such as an office or house or apartment.


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From experience, this is an extract from a piece about "Performance Management" otherwise known as a "Business performance review" In that context, the reviewee is often rated something along the lines of "poor / okay / better than average" but the term used for the latter is often stretch, as in a person being 'stretched' professionally, as opposed to '...


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In short, yes. It's a turn of phrase that means you got completely wrapped up in the activity. Usually it's used as an excuse as to why you're late or didn't get something done! [Sorry I didn't do the work/ Sorry I'm an hour late] I got carried away playing WoW. Or it can just mean you went too far with the activity (because you were on a roll or just ...


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Yes they are all gramatically correct, and they all mean roughly the same thing. There isn't much to choose between them, let's see: "Look at those tables, stacked one on top of another." To me this says "there are many tables, stacked up in an arbitrary fashion" - probably what you intended to say with this sentence! "Look at those tables stacked on ...


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Looking up just over will not give you a satisfactory interpretation because it is being used here as a phrasal verb. If you look up start over instead you get: Start Over to begin to do something again, sometimes in a different way: We decided to abandon the first draft of the report and start over. This meaning is being used in your ...


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You say you think you know what arch means, but just to be sure: it's not the noun meaning the round or pointy feature of buildings. It's an adjective meaning 'playful, mischievous or cunning' (we might refer to someone's 'arch sense of humour'). Mottos and slogans are very short and memorable phrases associated with schools, cities, businesses or political ...


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touch has many (related, but still different) meanings. You can refer to Merriam Webster, definition 7b: 7: something slight of its kind: such as  b : a small quantity or indication : hint   // a touch of spring in the air In this case, you can also replace it with the word 'bit'.


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I read that as squeezing in another duty, in this case "that hospital piece", into a busy schedule. In the UK the phrase "tuck in" has meanings such as: to push the bottom of shirt between skin and waistband of trousers or a skirt; to fold the edges of bed-sheets between a mattress and the bed base when making (i.e. putting on clean bedding) a bed. A ...


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A circuit in this context is the same thing as a press tour. From "How to Survive a Press Tour" at Entertainment Weekly: By the time this issue of EW hits the streets, I should be done with an Around the World Tour promoting Larry Crowne, which opens July 1. The itinerary calls for 13 cities, 30 days, crossing all 24 time zones and the international date ...


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This is very easy to just look up in a search engine of your choice. I searched 'benjamins meaning' and the first result was: Today's word is Benjamins. It is a noun meaning hundred dollar bill. The word comes from the name of a famous American whose face is showing on the hundred dollar bill. His name is Benjamin Franklin. Therefore, a Benjamin means a ...


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"Resource" can take a complement with "for", specifying the purpose or target of the resource. So A resource for the medical field means a resource applied to the medical field, which doesn't make a lot of sense, and would probably be interpreted as A resource for certain unspecified activities in the medical field. "Resource" does not take a complement ...


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