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5 votes
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Requesting explanation on the meaning of the word 'Passerby'?

Passer-by a person that is passing or going by, esp on foot He likes to walk the streets, observing passers-by and engaging them in conversation. The Guardian (2018) In the OP’s example, both ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
4 votes
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Is this called a math problem or a math question or a math exercise?

For precision in these answers you may be better off in the Mathematics forum. But at a basic language level my answers are: Problem, question and exercise are all natural words in this context. You ...
Peter Kirkpatrick's user avatar
3 votes

Requesting explanation on the meaning of the word 'Passerby'?

Just a point of clarification. All that is necessary for the meaning is a location and people walking past it. A second person somehow linked with the location is unnecessary but certainly possible. ...
TimR's user avatar
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3 votes

Requesting explanation on the meaning of the word 'Passerby'?

In general, we say "passerby" to mean someone passing by some specific place. (And side note, the technically correct plural is "passersby", but many English speakers say "...
Jay's user avatar
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3 votes
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Word/phrase to describe this "circular" logic?

The situation you describe could be characterized as your talking past one another or even as having two separate conversations. Both of these characterizations get at the fact that neither of you ...
Paul Tanenbaum's user avatar
3 votes

can we say "the fan turned off by itself"?

We find lots of entries when we Google turned off by itself. This usage is hence quite common. This is true too when it comes to books. Google Books has lots of hits for turned off by itself. For ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
3 votes
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Is it correct to say "glide my fingernail on the adhesive tape to feel its rim"?

tape and tape end. Often with various types of tape, we can't find the end. So: We run a fingernail (thumb or forefinger) around the roll of tape until we find edge or end of the tape. Then, we use ...
Lambie's user avatar
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2 votes

Is it correct to say "glide my fingernail on the adhesive tape to feel its rim"?

"Glide" is possible but not the best word. "To glide" in this context means to move smoothly, gracefully, and effortlessly, without encountering any resistance. Merriam-Webster's ...
Stuart F's user avatar
  • 2,513
2 votes

Do we use "the + singular noun" to express that type of goods?

The When we use the definite article it does not mean that the thing spoken about is unique, ie that only one exists in the entire world. It only has to be unique within the context - your audience ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 106k
2 votes

Requesting explanation on the meaning of the word 'Passerby'?

When the word passerby refers to people, it is used by an observer who is at a fixed point - like sitting at a cafe table - seeing people go by: the passersby. If you are walking down a road, the ...
Lambie's user avatar
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2 votes

Idiom in english meaning "You need intelligence to cheat"?

I don't have sources for these, but maybe they're useful: "It's only illegal if you get caught" "Steal a candy bar and you go to jail; steal $1,000,000 from the candy company and you ...
Kaia's user avatar
  • 1,011
2 votes

Is it correct to say "he gave me a bookshelf" or "he gave me bookshelves"?

Bookshelves is ambiguous, but so would be bookshelf. The ambiguity can be avoided by referring to the thing your father gave you as a bookcase.
Paul Tanenbaum's user avatar
1 vote

Word/phrase to describe this "circular" logic?

We could consider argument without end. The Dutch historian Pieter Geyl (died in 1966) coined the phrase “argument without end” to get at the constant reappearance of old arguments or viewpoints. [...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
1 vote

Is this called a math problem or a math question or a math exercise?

It is a problem, a question and an exercise. 20+30=50 is the working out, in the form of a sum and the total, that the child has done to answer the problem/question/exercise. A "sum" is used ...
James K's user avatar
  • 226k
1 vote
Accepted

Idiom in english meaning "You need intelligence to cheat"?

I think OP has this phrase in mind Nakal karne ko akal chahiye. (Correct me if I am wrong. I am not a native Hindi speaker) English word for a person who blindly copy others is copycat. Ref. ...
James Mathai's user avatar
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1 vote
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Do we use "the + singular noun" to express that type of goods?

Unless the context says otherwise, in general use like in the Mary example, that is used as described in Cambridge Dictionary: We use that most commonly to point to a thing or person. In a shop, ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
1 vote
Accepted

"Going to the movies is more fun ________" => with company, in company, or something else?

TLDR: "in" is reasonable, but "with" is better here. As Lambie says, this one example is very contextual. Beware of applying this to other contexts, because "in company" (...
Andy Bonner's user avatar
  • 15.7k

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