29 votes

What do you call a place where certain ideas are prevalent?

You can use stronghold figuratively which is also prevalent in political context. figurative and in figurative contexts. Esp.: a place where a particular cause or belief is strongly defended or ...
user avatar
  • 461
27 votes

What do you call a place where certain ideas are prevalent?

"Hotbed" could work. Also consider "bastion", which is often used to describe a place in which certain political sentiments are strongly held: anything seen as preserving or ...
user avatar
13 votes

What do you call the pointy parts of a text bubble that's not the tail?

It represents the radio transmission of someone talking to the character using spikes, in this case a triple spike. Usually it is for announcements or sound effects. I don't think there is an official ...
user avatar
  • 5,536
12 votes

How do I convey that I am bad at remembering things?

Of course you can say: I am bad at remembering things. ;-( But more commonly, you use: bad/poor/terrible memory A student with a poor memory may struggle in school. And if you have a really bad ...
user avatar
  • 1,378
12 votes
Accepted

What do you call the pointy parts of a text bubble that's not the tail?

I would use the word "spike". (And in this particular case triple spike.) Here are some links: Metal speech bubble with spikes Wooden speech bubble with spikes Google Images search result
user avatar
  • 1,378
8 votes

making a statement on an array of similar cases

The simplest expression is "John knows how many points are needed to get to each school." The others are either more wordy than they need to be, or awkward, or even inappropriate. ...
user avatar
5 votes

How do I convey that I am bad at remembering things?

A common idiomatic expression is having the memory of a goldfish. To have an exceptionally poor memory. An allusion to the myth that goldfish can't remember anything for longer than a few seconds. ...
user avatar
  • 461
5 votes
Accepted

"I am a citizen of Britain" vs. "I am a subject of the British crown" vs. "I am a British national"

The first of your suggestions is best, but I would like to suggest a better alternative: I am a British citizen
user avatar
  • 5,536
5 votes

How do I convey that I am bad at remembering things?

As you can see, there are lots of options, but "I have a bad memory" is also just fine. It does have that ambiguity, as a matter of the meanings of the words, but people will know what you ...
user avatar
  • 2,795
4 votes

How do I convey that I am bad at remembering things?

A good word for this is forgetful. DialFrost’s suggestion of absentminded or absent-minded is another great one. We often describe intelligent people as absent-minded. A few of the others have, to ...
user avatar
  • 4,409
4 votes

What do you call a place where certain ideas are prevalent?

Nexus? 3: center, focus The bookstore has become something of a nexus for the downtown neighborhood. This term is value-neutral, without negative or positive connotations. But it has more of a sense ...
user avatar
3 votes

What do you call the pointy parts of a text bubble that's not the tail?

As a direct description of their appearance I agree with @PPH, however as @DialFrost points out, there are other levels of understanding. An artist is likely to refer to any changes (and just the ...
user avatar
3 votes

What is opposite of the phrase "Sprinting to the finish line"?

I would suggest Crawling to the finish line. It will be familiar to your audience as a play on "sprinting to the finish line" and it captures what you mean. Other options (with other more ...
user avatar
  • 1,663
3 votes

How do I convey that I am bad at remembering things?

You have choices: I have a poor memory. I am forgetful. There are holes in my memory. My memory is often a blank. Those express the idea that memories are missing. Sometimes you want to say that you ...
user avatar
  • 6,461
3 votes

How do I convey that I am bad at remembering things?

"I have a bad memory" sounds a lot like I remember something bad that happened to me. While that is grammatically speaking a correct possible interpretation, a listener will be perfectly ...
user avatar
  • 1,399
3 votes

What do you call a place where certain ideas are prevalent?

If you want to suggest that a certain place is both a center of and a source of specific ideas, you can call it a hub.
user avatar
  • 1,228
2 votes

"allocated" or "relocated" in this context?

Neither of the two options you give sound particularly natural to my ear: European technology allocated in Africa This suggests that you are distributing (or giving away) technology in Africa, which ...
user avatar
  • 1,663
2 votes

Is it natural to say "You have to aim your mouth into the bowl" or "You have to aim the rinsed water into the bowl"?

To not confuse her, try: Spit the toothpaste/water in the bowl I find it unnatural to say "aim your mouth" and "aim the rinsed water" as an AmE, and is rarely used in the first ...
user avatar
  • 5,536
2 votes

What do you call a facility that accepts recyclables?

Seems like a recycling processing facility. According to the EPA page The U.S. Recycling System: The materials are transported by the collector to a processing facility, such as a materials recovery ...
user avatar
  • 11.2k
1 vote

How can I use in a sentence the phrase 'ordinary folk'?

Those were the heady days when stockbrokers commanded salaries beyond those of ordinary folk. Ordinary folk = ordinary people (i.e. not stockbrokers).
user avatar
  • 2,042
1 vote

What do you call a facility that accepts recyclables?

I would call them "recycling centers" or even a "recycling point", but in this case a large facility/center to hold these. "Recycling depot" fits your description ...
user avatar
  • 5,536
1 vote

Is "beauty king" or "handsome king" the counterpart of "beauty queen"?

The is no general term for a man who wins a male "handsome" contest for the simple reason that such contests do not generally exist. I would not be surprised if some such contests exist (and ...
user avatar
  • 496
1 vote

To (lessen, improve, alleviate) Disadvantage

reduces the number of disadvantages works. You can also simply go with: the new method is an improved version of the old one. Your solution of overcome may work, but some people may view it as ...
user avatar
  • 5,536
1 vote

How do I convey that I am bad at remembering things?

"absentminded" is a perfect fit here: tending to forget or fail to notice things Source Strongest option as well on our sister site here
user avatar
  • 5,536
1 vote
Accepted

What is the concise word or phrase of getting caught in an embarrassing situation?

Not quite sure if there is an alternative for this phrase, but "get caught in an embarrassing situation" is already a common phrase used. Depending on your context, you can even say: get ...
user avatar
  • 5,536
1 vote

Do we call it "a lounge" in a cinema?

In British English, this part of a cinema is called the foyer. In American English, it is called the lobby (they also call cinemas 'movie theatres'). Not all cinemas have seating like you have ...
user avatar
  • 73k
1 vote

Is it idiomatic to say "you need a subject in your sentence when talking to grown-ups"?

Since English doesn't have this idiosyncrasy, your sentence is not idiomatic, but it is descriptive enough to get your point across. Correspondingly, English does not have a similar expression.
user avatar
  • 1,521
1 vote

What is the opposite of "plain housing/plain residential buildings"?

You could simply use "attractive", "aesthetically pleasing", "appealing", "alluring". There are many others here as well!
user avatar
  • 5,536
1 vote

Alternate phrase for the phrase "losing its zing"?

If you eat pizza everyday,... ...it will lose its attraction. ...it will become boring. ...you will become bored with it. ...you will become blasé about it ...you will get fed up with it. ...you will ...
user avatar
  • 6,542
1 vote
Accepted

A specific case of sexual harassment

"...who had sexually assaulted her...". Or, as Daniel Roseman has suggested, molested. By the way... "Tearful eyes" means her eyes were crying. We cry: our eyes don't. Or you might ...
user avatar

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible