4

I'm not sure there is an English word that is exactly equivalent to the Vietnamese word. "Pounce" is closest. It means to jump at something in order to catch it. However, it doesn't necessarily mean that the hunt was successful. To be clear about what happened, you would have to provide more information, such as, "After stalking the mouse silently, the cat ...


4

I would say: He pulled the drawer out so hard it came off the track and fell on the floor. You could also say "pulled the drawer open", but "open" refers to his goal, not to what happened. It might be better to say "pulled out" since this describes the actual motion which caused the problem. I have chosen the phrase "came off" because he pulled the ...


3

Anything between nothing and "Hold the nail in a fixed position against the wall without moving it so I may strike it with my hammer" How much detail do you think you need to give. It is quite possible that you don't need to say anything at all. The mere fact you are working together means that there is no need to say anything at all. Or "Hold it, please" ...


3

The object you desribed is called a twist tie.


3

From a language perspective, "you are splashing my face with the water" is fine. From a physics perspective, I would think that your face is probably the least likely part of your body to get wet since it's the farthest from the ground where the puddle is. From a parenting perspective, you might want to not say anything and just let the kid have fun.


3

"She twisted her ankle" or "She sprained her ankle" are both correct, but I wouldn't regard it as wrong if someone said "foot" instead of ankle in either case. It might imply a slightly different location for the injury. So far as twisted vs. sprained, if it caused temporary pain and she can "walk it off", I'd say twisted. If it caused enough damage that ...


2

From my experience, the following four would definitely be among the most common ways to say that and they probably would be at the very top of the list: Did you hear that? What was that? What's that sound? What's that noise?


2

The Cambridge Dictionary defines say as to pronounce words or sounds, to express a thought, opinion, or suggestion, or to state a fact or instruction There is no requirement for the speaker to be human. If a device (toy, lift, ATM, etc) makes noises that are intended to sound like speech, we use the word say.


2

With three items to be distinguished from each other, three different lines are possible. It gets cumbersome to specify the number of lines, especially with more than three items. Instead, you can say "We need to draw clear lines between three different cases." Also, you can say "We need to distinguish/differentiate [between] three different cases." The ...


2

Creatures doesn't work at all. This includes animals, but excludes man (and robots) Entities is very broad. It means the same as "Things". You can say "intelligent beings" or some similar expression ("sentient", "self aware", "Self Perceiving"). Or even a new acronym "IBs". Since this is science fiction (no general artificial intelligence exists.) you ...


2

It is usually a blue light for emergency vehicles in the UK. Ambulances etc have a revolving light. It is also called a "flashing light" The sound is a siren. When you hear a siren or see flashing lights from an ambulance or fire engine, if they are following you, you must slow down and pull over. I'm not sure what you mean by "verb that expresses it" ...


2

Siren is the word you're looking for.


2

If it's touching the floor, the best verb is probably trail. https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/trail "Don't let the cable trail on the floor."


2

"Uneven" describes a surface which is not flat, so it isn't quite the right word to describe a chair. You might instead use: unstable wobbly "Wobbly" is the most commonly used. For example, a recent episode of the US TV sitcom Curb Your Enthusiasm featured a recurring anecdote about a "wobbly table": "Nobody likes a wobbly table... I could not live ...


1

Using "push over" when the action is actually pulling would not be correct. You can, however, say "pull over" to mean that you pulled something/someone and it fell over as a result. The definition you quoted is one meaning of "to pull over", but it is not the only meaning. For example, this makes perfect sense: I pulled the chair over and it landed on ...


1

Question: Is it okay to say "don't step your slippers on the mat"? or maybe "don't step on the mat while wearing your slippers"? Answer: No, it is not. Don't step on the mat in your slippers. Don't walk on the mat in your slippers. Those are the ways it would be said. For items of clothing including shoes, we say: in your shoes. If you are wearing them, ...


1

No. You don't "step" your shoes, slippers or your feet. It sounds like you want to say "don't step on the mat in your slippers".


1

To close the stable door after the horse has bolted is pretty much the same as the Vietnamese one you offer. I would say it is slightly stronger than your definition of "doing things when it happened, without preparation" in that it also implies your response is too late to have any effect at all, and therefore ultimately pointless. Without straying too ...


1

Most of those options are actually reasonably natural, but you might choose one or another if you wanted to emphasize certain aspects more. The only one that sounds a little strange is #4 ("the body of Mike"). It just sounds a bit unnecessarily wordy (most people would just say "Mike's body" instead) As for which to use when, it's mostly a stylistic thing:...


1

The Cambridge Dictionary offers these definition for pop out and spill: pop out: to move quickly and suddenly, especially from a closed space spill: to (cause to) flow, move, fall, or spread over the edge or outside the limits of something Note the highlighted words in these definitions. We generally use pop out when something happens quickly, and ...


1

Pop suggests an active movement, jumping or being thrown out. Spill is better for clothes falling out of a suitcase - or you could use fell or tumbled. I think most native speakers would say something like The suitcase came open and...


1

Well, I couldn't think in one word with this whole meaning, so I'll give you some sentences using your idea, it helps? Mentioning the poet Rihanna Bitch, better have my money! When you know you are in debt You don't want Johnny to pay you a visit Rush! You have until sunday or things are going to get ugly If you delay even 1 second, heads will roll ...


1

All elephant's tusks are of ivory, so referring to them, I would just say "elephant tusks". If a smuggler had a bag of elephant tusks, one could say that he was smuggling ivory. I wouldn't say "an elephant has two ivories". I think all elephants have two tusks, unless they have lost one or both, so I wouldn't say "This elephant has two ivory tusks"....


1

I think you mean that he "went out of his way". It can refer to doing something good or something bad. If it refers to something bad, it's probably referring to some behavior that was not provoked, as it was in your example. Suppose he's washing his car, and someone is walking by, minding his own business. Then, he stopped washing the car and and went out ...


1

You should definitely consider using "sentient beings" or "sentient life". This word (sentience) describes something that is able to experience things and feel emotion. This word is commonly used in science fiction. Note that animal sentience is still somewhat debated, so some readers may assume that the the word "sentient" only applies to intelligent life (...


1

Another way to express it: "He revved his motorbike noisily." American Heritage Dictionary "rev" 1a a. To increase the speed of (a motor, for example): revved the engine. The word "noisily" already conveys the sonic nuisance. Another possibility: "He revved his motorbike [aggressively], making the engine roar."


1

The US expression you generally hear is "the insides" to refer to interior parts. It seems most dictionaries only list the singular, inside, but that generally refers to the interior as a whole. Insides seems to be listed exclusively as an informal substitute for the guts, but that is not how I would characterize its usage.


1

The kind that are plastic or paper molded around a thin metal wire are called "twist ties". Wikipedia: twist tie


1

As a native British English speaker, then your example sounds absolutely fine, and stained seems like the correct word to use. For reference then at least one major toothpaste manufacturer appears to agree.


1

Short answer: Yes. People will commonly say, "Oh, I've got to cut this thread off", or a little shorter, "I've got to cut this thread."


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