24

There are three distinct concepts: A ship is launched. At this point the ship is named and the hull enters the water, however the ship is not yet complete, a great deal of work remains. A ship is commissioned. This usually applies to Naval vessels. Prior to this, the hull is fitted out and sea trials are carried out. When the ship is commissioned, it is ...


24

One could say "spherically", or "within a one-kilometer sphere". In some contexts the three-dimensionality will be obvious, as when one is speaking ot the relative position of satellites, say, or stars There are ten satellites within a fifty kilometer radius There are fewer than twelve stars within ten light-years of the sun. But there is no ...


16

I would use “drawback”, meaning “an objectionable feature”. For example, I really like that car, but the low gas mileage is a huge drawback that I can’t overlook. “Drawback” is less suitable for something that is a personal preference, like the color of the car, which might be something someone else would like. In that case, I would use “turn-off” as ...


15

Pretty much just like that. "Radius" is used for spheres as well as circles. ... anything inside a sphere of one-kilometer radius around the object. Alternately, just say ... anything within one kilometer of the object assuming it's obvious you're talking about spatial rather than surface distances.


9

Informally, Americans will say "turn-off". For example, "the phone doesn't have an replaceable battery, which is a turn-off for me". You wouldn't use it in more polite/formal speech though. If the issue causes you to fully reject something, you can use "showstopper".


7

All three options work and are widely used. But you do need to drop the article if you use 'per': 12 dollars per bottle 12 dollars for a bottle 12 dollars a bottle


6

Launched is the only one of the given choices that sounds at all fluent. But it doesn't imply this is the boat's first voyage. You launch your boat every time you move it from land to water. For some boats, like small ones used for fishing on a lake or river, that could be every time you use the boat. The most common idiom used to talk about a boat's first ...


6

We have many of those. Maybe one of these can help you: "I wasn't born yesterday." "I've been around the block a few times." "I didn't just fall off the turnip truck yesterday." (actually I forgot which vegetable was mentioned in this one, -- maybe it was a tomato truck?)


5

A strike against is another option (e.g., "the colour is a strike against it"), or downside, or even just a negative. M-W defines strike against as follows: strike against (noun) something that makes someone or something less likely to be accepted, approved, successful, etc. : Her poor attendance was a strike against her. while downside is defined as: ...


4

The phrase "deal breaker" is similar to "showstopper". (But different in this way: a "showstopper" is an insurmountable problem because normally "the show must go on", whereas a "deal breaker" is not necessarily an insurmountable problem, it just means no deal is, was, or will be agreed upon) You could also use positive and negative "impact" on your ...


3

According to the wikipedia article on Sound trademarks, the various sounds associated with a company can be a: sound logo (or audio mnemonic) jingle brand music/theme The first, "sound logo," would probably be exactly the phrase used to refer to this THX sound, however this is not commonly used outside of marketing I think. People would be able to figure ...


3

You can say: One kilometer in any direction.


2

I had a marked disinclination to dating her after I found out about her incarceration for assault. I was disinclined to purchase the car when I discovered it had been in a wreck. I was chary of pursuing that line of action; It could could be dangerous. Averse, or indisposed or reluctant could also be used. All of these words have various shades of ...


2

There is an alleged process of transferring the disease in voodoo practices. For example As soon as the doll is ‘animated’ visualize how you are solving the situation at that moment by making the disease separate from the patient and transfering it into the doll itself. (Source: White Magic and Voodoo). The word "stealing" is used in some fantasy games ...


2

Change the preposition to 'in', unless the pictures are on the cover or the brochure is not a folded type.


2

'Usually use' repeats the 'use' sound, but that isn't really a problem, it's quite normal. Examples: Basically, anytime you can use ‘only’, you can usually use ‘just’ to mean the same thing. (BBC English web site) We can use when to introduce a single completed event that takes place in the middle of a longer activity or event. In these cases, we ...


2

usually if there is a lot of make-up that someone has put on, and you can clearly tell, it could be described as "caked on"


2

Sentences 1 and 4 are correct. "the opening of the bridge" and "the bridge opening" mean the same. Sentences 2 and 3 don't work. Each requires an extra word, which converts them into 4 and 1 respectively, for them to make proper sense.


1

“You look like a clown” is a pretty offensive thing that’s said when someone’s wearing too much makeup. If you’ve ever seen a clown, it’s pretty obvious why people say this: clowns often wear face paint that that looks like poorly done makeup. Examples in use: How To Easily Apply Red Lipstick Without Feeling Like You Look Like A Clown MUA advice, think I ...


1

To avoid the ambiguity you could express it in one of two different ways. He was showing me additional pictures of those members of his orchestra who had appeared in the invitation brochure. This sentence indicates that the pictures exist separately from the brochure itself. He was showing me all of the pictures of the members of his orchestra that ...


1

I agree with Jan that I'd rather use "to speed up", but this Google Ngram graph shows "accelerate" is often used as well. A good part of the 20th century both options were equally used:


1

There are many "witty" comments that you can make if you want to make it clear that you think you are being cheated. This is generally called calling his bluff or uncovering his fraud. It is not a friendly response, regardless of the exact words; people don't want to do business with a liar. If you what to continue the transaction but negotiate a lower ...


1

Other idioms for this purpose: I'm not still wet behind the ears. I didn't wake up this morning and decide to be a mechanic. (or whatever profession is relevant) I've been in this business a while. I'm not green as grass. ("green" means "inexperienced" in this phrase -- it's an allusion to new fruit on a tree that is not near mature or ripe) ...


1

What you were doing can be described in several ways: Implementing suggested changes from the code review Improving the code based on comments from the code review Applying corrections/improvements/fixes suggested in the code review Note that reviews typically generate comments (or requests for changes, in more official cases). A remark is a statement that ...


1

A term commonly used in navies is a 'shakedown cruise', during which the systems of the ship are tested to work out any problems that may exist within the ship. The term 'sea trials' may also be used in the same way, but that term is primarily applied to the first ship of a class of ship.


1

A word not previously mentioned is adverse. Although similar to averse, averse typically relates to a person whereas adverse relates to some thing. Revising your sample sentence slightly: X has an adverse effect on my decision to buy the product. I am averse to X and therefore may not buy the product. Both sentences tell us the likelihood of purchasing ...


1

I am not clear why you think the verb "feed" is incorrect or inappropriate here. When an organization provides food to people, it feeds them. Yes, one could say "caters" or "provides food" or "serves meals" or "furnishes lunches" or any of several other possibilities. None of these is incorrect. But they mostly add words without adding information. The verb "...


1

There are several short expressions that you could use here: regarding your question about X regards to X In response to your question,


1

Shield: a person or thing providing protection. "John was like a human shield, jumping in between the attackers and the unsuspecting victim" synonyms: protection, guard, defence, cover, screen, shade, safety, security, shelter, safeguard, support, bulwark, protector "He could only use his hands to shade his bald head from the blistering sun" verb:...


1

You can use any of the following as they are antonyms of out loud: inaudibly, silently, soundlessly, voicelessly. "She was singing inaudibly." "I am singing silently." "The mimes were singing soundlessly." "Tom had a sore throat and was forced to stand in the choir singing voicelessly." And these are near antonyms of out loud: faintly, feebly, low, ...


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