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You already said this in your answer, but for the negative case, you could describe something as pointless. Some expressions also come to mind, but they are more specific: This is a solution in search of a problem. (In other words, there is no good reason to implement such a thing.) He/she is a rebel without a cause. (In other words, he/she complains ...


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The answer to this depends more on how university years are organised in your region. University years are not uniformly structured across the English-speaking world. A fairly generic approach might be: How far along are you in your university programme? What year (of university) are you in? In much of the Commonwealth (including Canada), the ...


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That is a "title of address". Forms often refer to it as a "prefix", just as they often call '"Jr", "2nd" etc a "suffix", because a title of address preceds the name in this usage. Other titles of address include: "Sir", "Lady", "Lord", "Bishop", "Governor", "Senator", "Earl", "General" and many others. A title of address is one that may precede a name ...


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If I understand you correctly, "Would you please serve the meal," would be an approximate translation. Colloquially, an unruly child might say, "Can we eat now?" More polite might be the use of "Is everyone ready to eat?" This might be used after some preliminary activity, such as playing a game, and it doesn't imply that someone is arbitrarily designated ...


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Overview I think any of "inconsistent" "irregular", "variable", "varied", or "uneven" could work for this. I think you have been too ready to accept a single definition as barring a perfectly valid use of a word. The choice of which term to use there is a matter of style and personal choice. Dictionary citations Irregular Merriam-Webster gives: ...


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"Worker A had regular weekly earnings... " works fine. consistent or steady also can be used with the same meaning. I think the problem lies in your research. You did the right thing, but unfortunately Google and Ngram do not always return the results you would expect. I've been chided here for quoting their statistics, so I don't rely on them any more. ...


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To express something negative in the sense of "another indignity" there is the final insult. Although I couldn't find a good reference to a dictionary definition of the term, it's something I commonly hear. There are many examples of its use. All bold text in the following is my own emphasis. "The Final Insult: A Lost Domain" by Paul Boutin: They lost ...


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The question is grammatically correct, but the teacher would be more likely to say Is anybody absent/away today? The yes/no part of your proposed answers is not correct, though. If nobody is absent, the students would answer "no" to the teacher's question: No miss, everyone is here today There are additional problems with your answers when one or ...


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"Yes miss, everyone is here today." or "No miss, everyone is not here today." Both sentences above are answers to the question "Is everyone present today?" or "Is everyone here today?" They are not proper answers to the question "Is any student absent today?" To which, the appropriate answer would be "Yes miss, Carla is absent. She is sick." ...


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I would suggest "on the rise" if you prefer an idiom. There are virtually an indefinite number of expressions that can satisfy the requirement-astonishing, phenomenal, spectacular, impressive, remarkable and so on and so forth.


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phenomenal serves the purpose. Here are three links which show synonyms for phenomenal.You can use any of them for your sentence. https://thesaurus.yourdictionary.com/wondrous https://thesaurus.yourdictionary.com/remarkable https://thesaurus.yourdictionary.com/phenomenal


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Often, sentences can start with "(and) to think", usually used to underscore or emphasize the following statement or observation. Aside from that, "to think" can start sentences, in particular when functioning as the infinitive form of the verb. As an example, "To think is to stretch the brain", an expression that I just made up (but I'm sure there are a ...


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I can't think of anything that is relevant that fits in the blank (without any surrounding changes) followed by a "by". The first "by" is misplaced; it does not fit there. I think what you need is a "for". The product is guaranteed to be reliable for 10 years of use by the military. It stills sounds off to me. Why not rephrase it? This is one option: ...


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The closest equivalent, that isn't the explicit phrase "reason for existing", in the negative, might be nothing to stand on. "Fabric" can be used to refer to something that, when it exists, something else exists (i.e. it makes "the existence" of something else). This might be used as part of a phrase for the positive. A church not claiming to be The ...


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Cut the conversation short He 'cut the conversation short' or 'brought it to a close' or 'concluded it swiftly' or 'deftly ended it' - by lying to her.


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As far as an idiomatic way of phrasing it, some phrases I would suggest are "picked up the slack" or "took up the mantle", e.g.: "Karen didn't know how to do the task she was assigned, so I picked up the slack and completed it on her behalf." ("Pick up the slack" implies that the other person is not doing their fair share and you are compensating for them, ...


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