4

Either: a safety helmet or hard hat.


4

It is generally called a lanyard. lanyard a cord passed round the neck, shoulder, or wrist for holding a knife, whistle, or similar object.


3

Literally the opposite of "in the dark" is "in the light": I moved out of the darkness and into the light However, it isn't natural to say "I'm in the light" in the same way we say "I'm in the dark". Darkness is an absence of light. We tend more often to refer to the kind of light we are in, for example: Don't run around in the dark - you should ...


2

totter and stagger are what you want, for instance: He staggered home, drunk and intoxicated.


1

Sure you can call that swinging. make regular movements forwards and backwards or from one side to another while hanging from a particular point. That would seem to fit here and its certainly not the case that the object must be suspended from above. Doors can swing open, for example. If you want to tell your child to stop swinging on the bed, normal ...


1

The expression using the plural grounds is approximately twice as popular today as the singular ground. However, Google Books Ngram Viewer indicates that detained on the ground is much older than the plural version and until the turn of the millennium, was also much more popular. However, it's always detained on THE grounds and not on a ground. So if you ...


1

My preferred dictionary has this definition for the verb to whip: beat (a person or animal) with a whip or similar instrument, especially as a punishment or to urge them on. So yes, the verb can be used for any weapon, not just "a whip". Interestingly, hitting someone with the butt of a gun is called "pistol-whipping".


1

I would call that entire device "a power strip with a long cord." If the fact that it has a long cord isn't important, I would just call it "a power strip." On the other hand, I might call the whole device "an extension cord," since it serves the purpose of an extension cord. I would call the three parts of that device "the plug" (the part that plugs into ...


1

"Box" is probably fine. But "pack" is also possible. If you mean just the coiled up string and not the plastic container then also "spool of floss"


1

Yes, picture 4 is upside down. I would call picture 3 lying on its side. I would use sideways if the cart was moving in the direction of one of its sides, maybe because someone was kicking it out of the way. As to picture 2, you would have to say something like it is tipped up on its handle.


1

You've asked for a general term to describe a piece of religious text placed on a shrine between the Chinese gods Tudigong and Caishen. The text itself might be termed an inscription. As it is on a piece of wood, it may also be called an engraving. Depending on the content of the inscription, there are some generic terms for religious texts such as a ...


1

I was walking down the road and I accidentally stepped in a big pothole. Holes like this are called "potholes" and "dropping a leg in" would be "stepping in the pothole". You need to adverb "accidentally" if you need to make that explicit (but if you don't mention it, people will probably assume it was accidental).


1

Yes, all of those would do. Do you need to mention the cardboard container? I bought my mate 24 cans of beer for his birthday. It might be more natural not to say whether they were in a box or not. "24 beer cans" could be empty cans. But in context, nobody would be confused.


1

Legs: "Keep your legs closer (or close together)." Keep your legs close together with your feet lightly touching each other. (Yoga Poses: Speedy Study Guides) or Don't keep your legs apart (like that). (Ludwig) Note: a) "Far apart" is mainly used in the exercise context as an instruction what to do: "Sit with legs far apart." and not to say what ...


1

It's called a hand sanitizer. Also alternatively: a hand antiseptic, a handrub, a hand rub. It is a cleansing agent for your hands.


1

I found the answer, it is called "threshold" threshold [count] 1 : a piece of wood, metal, or stone that forms the bottom of a door and that you walk over as you enter a room or building He stepped across the threshold. When they were married he carried her over the threshold. [=he picked her up and carried her into their home when they ...


1

The correct term is: Trouser Leg - the leg of a pair of trousers I know you were probably hoping for a one word answer, but I don't believe there is one. Note that in the US, you may use "pant leg" instead. The following sounds most natural to me: Put your leg through your left trouser leg


1

In the United States, what you describe is called "Wite-Out", pronounced as white-out. It was invented and trademarked some 50 years ago and comes in different forms. There is Wite-Out tape and Wite-Out pens. More generally, these things are called correction pens (using correction fluid or white-out) and correction tape.


1

Usually we refer to both an arrangement like this and an art representation of that arrangement as a "still life". Typically it is composed of inanimate objects--classic examples are bowls of fruit, flowers, flowing fabric, etc.


1

I’m not aware of a common term. In the southern U.S., we might refer to the door as a sliding door or possibly a screen door. Both are ambiguous because they might be made of glass or screen material. A screen door could also be a hinged door or a sliding glass door. You’ll sometimes hear the latter called a sliding glass door. Likewise, we’ll call a screen ...


1

A "Pillion passenger" is a person sitting behind the driver on a motorbike. You don't say "I rode a pillion passenger". It is possible to say I took a pillion passenger I carried my friend as a pillion passenger I rode with my friend as a pillion passenger You can use the phrase "ride pillion" My friend rode pillion. (but avoid "I rode my friend ...


1

"Cut" means that someone used a knife or scissors on it. "Break" suggests that it isn't able to work properly. Split suggests to me that the rope is separated length wise. I cut the rope into 1 metre pieces and tied each length of cut rope to the corners of my tent. (the rope was cut with a knife but it still "works") The rope broke as we tried to ...


1

I assume you mean "made the chair fall over". The typical way to say it would be "you knocked down the chair". Depending on the exact action, you could also say "you pushed the chair over". In other words, you describe the boy's actions, not trying to force "fall" into the sentence. Just to confuse you, there is difference between "to fall" and "to fell". ...


1

The first one is. (That's the guy with the baseball cap.) The second one is a frown. The emotion expressed is more anger than disapproval. The third one is a weird face pulled by a model, probably to be comical. The way to think about disapproval vs anger. Disapproval is when you have looked in the back of the fridge and found something has spoiled. ...


1

In robotics, position refers to the (x,y,z) coordinates of an object, while pose refers to both the position (3D) and orientation (3D) of an object.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible