38

"Blank out", "brain glitch", and "brain fart" are not mental illnesses. They are all legitimate, albeit possibly crude, vernacular for temporary stupidity. There are others such as "senior moment". This is a facetious reference to the kind of absent-minded dementia occurring in the elderly. I forgot my phone when I left the house this morning. I must ...


12

Discombobulated is a nice word that implies temporary confusion.


11

'I just lost my train of thought' can be described in the case that I just forgot what I was talking or thinking previously, it might suit some of your situations. Merriam-Webster's definition of train of thought even includes a sample usage that mirrors what you are asking about: train of thought (noun phrase) a series of thoughts or ideas that ...


7

I quite often use the phrase 'slipped a cog', implying my mental machinery momentarily stuttered. I think I picked the phrase up from a grandparent several decades back.


6

I very much agree with Andrew, But then: Situation A is a little bit exceptional as, compared to the other situations, it's a kind of "overthinking" issue. I would generally say that in English it's probably a separate word (literally overthinking) For Situations B, C, and D you could say: British English "Lapse": a slip; error to have a blackout ...


4

You can try one of these: water over which holy words have been read water that has been blessed water upon which a holy man has breathed


3

"Silly me!" and variants like "I'm (so) dumb" are often used in the first person. Although I think a simple "oops" or "whoops" are even more common. As an actual name for the event, "having a brain fart" is the most common one I encounter. That said, I think generally people just describe what happened without giving it such a label. "What possessed you??" ...


3

For situation A, I've used the excuse "I guess I can't do math today." Situation B is definitely an example of a "senior moment". While situation D is where "brain fart" could easily be used. The instance of Situation C is more difficult. I can't think of a good word of phrase for that one. About the only thing I can think of is "lose your mind". "Losing ...


3

To be honest, both sound perfectly fine. If I had to mark a difference between them, I would say that your second example sounds a bit more professional, like a question being proposed in an interview. Also, there is a mild difference in natural answers: "What new features of C# have you used?" In this case, you could honestly answer this question with ...


3

You may use "conversely": If n is even then n squared is also even. Conversely, if n-squared is even, then n is even.


2

"Jumping up to the ceiling" is not an idiomatic expression, but there are a number of others related to being in an elevated position: jump for joy be on cloud nine be flying high be walking on air be over the moon be in heaven be on top of the world and various others. Also for general interest, there's "dancing on the ...


2

The answer to the English part of the question is that “Let’s split the check” is acceptable. We might also say “I would prefer to pay my share of the bill.” For more specific advice about how to handle the situation without seeming ungrateful, you may want to look at the Interpersonal Skills Stack Exchange site. Etiquette in specific situations is on-topic ...


1

I am willing to do whatever it takes to pursue your JD program; your program is the key to unlock my dream of a better career. Not all keys are made of metal; as Wordnik says: key (noun) a determining factor in accomplishing or achieving something. Moreover, many English speakers use the verb unlock when they use the word key in this metaphorical sense. ...


1

"My dream of a better future depends on you" is correct and idiomatic English. "... is dependent on..." is also possible, and you can slightly de-personalise (and so make more formal) by saying "...on your decision." However, I would cut it completely. You should be focussed on telling them why they really want to have a student like you, instead of ...


1

The normal use (at least in my experience, I have a technical/scientific background) is to say the interval as the elapsed time between events that happen with a known frequency. So if interval is the reciprocal of rate then we might think that frame interval is the reciprocal of frame rate. However in regards to video, this does not appear to be in common ...


1

Frame duration? This quick Google Search gives quite a few people who are using it in support questions for video editing, and here is a definition on the website for the Institute for Telecommunication Services: frame duration: The time between the beginning of a frame and the end of that frame. Note: For fixed-length frames, at a fixed data rate, frame ...


1

If we’ve offended someone and now by making an apology we need to get them to forget it and forgive us. And then be normal to us i.e. no grudge in heart for us. What sentence is the most suitable? As James comments You can't make someone forgive you. I'll expand on that. You cannot make them Happy and you definitely will not remove their anger by putting ...


1

The context is not very realistic. You can't make someone forgive you. Of the sentences you quote "bring them round" is most idiomatic. You aren't trying to make him happy, or pleased, and "remove anger" isn't idiomatic. However you begin "I should", so you should focus on what you will do, not what the effect is. I should go and apologise, perhaps ...


1

Try Holy water Holy water is water that has been blessed by a member of the clergy or a religious figure. Holy Water


1

The comment is correct but the purpose of the slogan need only be clear to you based on your intention. I would take #3 A better world. Such slogans work on similar words (better/better) or somewhat similar sounding words (bigger/better). These form a couplet that is easier to remember and then sell. You could also add a few words to change the direction ...


1

What do you call something that's the inverse of something? I am not quite sure what you are looking for as there are a few alternative answers. A noun would be oposite or from your description, possibly more accurately would be exact opposite. It could also be flip side However, we could also use idioms like like chalk and cheese, Yin and Yang, mirror ...


1

The threads of [the victims]`s clothes remained behind, stuck to the shards of broken glass. Something like that should work.


1

These are fine. With "names" of tasks you often use "headlinese", and drop particles and articles. The main function is that the name should be clear, short and easy to understand and remember, rather than "idiomatic". As part of a text or in speech, you would normally use "the". It isn't needed as a "headline". However you may want to use a different ...


1

Due to the conflict of interest, I decided to ( keep away ) from this matter. In a legal setting the word might be recuse - to remove from participation in a court case due to potential prejudice or partiality. Due to the conflict of interest, I decided to recuse myself from further participation in this matter. It can be used outside of the courtroom ...


1

You can try refrain though it's mostly used for verbs (and 'matter' is a noun): : to keep oneself from doing, feeling, or indulging in something and especially from following a passing impulse // refrained from having dessert (source: Merriam-Webster) As for your new examples, I decided to refrain from participating I decided to refrain from ...


1

If the teacher wants to refer to the act of saying her guesses aloud, she could say, "Mandy is verbalizing her guesses aloud more frequently than before."


1

One would only say that the patient was asked to perform the test, if the test was one that the patient could self-administer. For example, there are now (and have been for a good number of years) blood-sugar tests where the patient punctures his or her skin, applies a drop of blood to a special test strip, inserts this into a meter, and reads off a blood-...


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