New answers tagged

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You would normally only need this in an historical context. You should just say "without anaesthetic" Consider https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK481552/ which is a long article that doesn't use any specialist term, yet uses other medical language (lithotomy is the removal of a bladder stone) The mere thought of having a leg amputated without ...


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I don't think there an idiomatic way of saying this, as such a thing is very rare. Surgery implies that cutting the body in some way is involved (except for dental surgery), which one would always have at least a local anesthesia for. It appears that there may be a medical term for using hypnosis instead of anesthesia, but this is is not really idiomatic, as ...


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Don't use "the", unless "the" is part of the name of the website. The name of "Google" is not "The Google". A message from the creator of HelloGiggles.com But this doesn't tell me that it is information about how to use the site. And I don't really need to be told what the site is. Not many websites have a "...


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It is so rare that there no usage. The judge may want to highlight some entries that did very well, but not quite well enough to win a prize. Everyone else is just not mentioned. I can't think of a situation in which a Judge says "Before I announce the winner let me mention some people who did really badly." That would be a form of "shaming&...


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A few less formal ways: "I have been there", "I have been in your position", or "I have been in your shoes". From a bankruptcy lawyer's website: I understand the frustration and worry you are going through because I have been in your shoes. My mother was a school teacher and my father worked at a tire factory. They could not ...


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Here are a few colourful idioms which mean the same; some are more dated than others. Note that they are a bit UK centric. "I'm in a pickle", or "I'm in a bit of a pickle". "I'm in deep sh*t right now", which is fairly typical street slang, common in the UK. "I'm up to my neck" (which could also just mean "I'm ...


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I believe that is not called a eye scratch, because that is something different. In the image it looks like a mole. Moles are found both on the skin as well as in the eye. Medical term is Nevus (plural nevi). "You have a scratch on the left of your eye" would literally mean you have a scratch to the left of your eye. If someone wants to describe ...


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Depending on the speaker, it could mean either. In context, and if a native speaker produced it, it would usually be understood as near the eye, not on the eye, i.e. "on the left of" = "to the left of". In everyday speech, 'he's got a scratch next to his right eye' would be perfectly sufficient to describe the scratch you have illustrated-...


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The family had a terrible run of bad luck. The Johnson's suffered a disastrous run of bad luck. a run of bad luck A period of continuous misfortune. I've just had a run of bad luck lately. After losing my job, I found out that I won't be entitled to any social welfare payments while I look for work. She broke up with him? Wow, the poor guy's run of bad luck ...


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This chain of bad things is called "a series of unfortunate events" or you can say "that person is dogged by misfortune". be dogged by misfortune (=have a lot of bad luck over a period of time) The project seemed dogged by misfortune. Longman Dictionary


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I don't think there are courtroom idioms that are so specific, but you might consider 'laughed out of court', which means the case presented was so poor, it was laughable. If you want to focus purely on the unpreparedness of the solicitor, you might consider some more general idioms such as "if you fail to prepare, prepare to fail" (or other ...


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The part of your foot that you walk on is the sole. In everyday speech we probably would say 'Your feet are dirty' without feeling it necessary to specify exactly which part. However, there is a formal word for the upper middle part of the foot - the instep.


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I have found in Gngrams that Tragic and terrible is more used than sad and unfortunate Tragic and terrible is stronger than your phrase, but I think it does apply in the given context.


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Where I'm from, you'd say Every hour, on the hour "On the hour" means "at no minutes past", but it wouldn't be clear alone that it happens every hour. I could say to you, at 8.49 am, that "the train leaves on the hour", and you'd know that there was a train at 9.00 am, but not necessarily that there would be one at 10.00 am.


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"On the hour" is possible, but is ultimately still ambiguous (Lexico: "At the same time every hour, or at the beginning of each hour"). "At the top of the hour" is good, although mostly an Americanism (M-W: "US: at the beginning of the hour (at 12:00, 1:00, 2:00, etc.)"). However, if you said "it happens at the ...


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It doesn't fit the context perfectly, but there's a phrase You can't see the forest for the trees. In this phrase, "for the trees" means "because of the trees", so it means that focus on little parts of something obscures the view of the whole. Cambridge can't see the forest for the trees to be unable to understand a situation clearly ...


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The word "stranger" is fine in context. If you wanted to be more literal, you could say -- I think this is what you or whoever wrote that sentence means -- "There was nothing in the victim's testimony that identified the defendant as the guilty person." Two quibbles: 1.This sounds like it's discussing a court case. If so, we generally ...


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"sojourn" can be used. It literally means 'a temporary stay' examples: Your sojourn to this place is most welcome. A sojourn to London on our way to Paris will a good decision.


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The expression "see eye to eye" means to be in agreement. It is true that in modern English, it tends to be used along with a negative, either can't or don't. However, the expression is very old and appears to be Biblical. It is found in the Hebrew Bible book of Isaiah, chapter 52 verse 8, and it is used in the positive sense: Thy watchmen shall ...


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"Spin by", as in "Come spin by my place" sounds more natural to my American ear. I found several web hits under "spin by my" or "come spin by". In this case, "by" indicates more of a quick diversion along a journey, rather than a terminal destination.


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"Come on by (for a bit)?" "Stop by"


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You can teach REMOTELY (ONLINE) or IN PERSON. IN PERSON would be my choice.


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Your two examples of: are you getting used to your new friends now? And: do you know them better now? Are all proper grammar. The first sentence uses "getting used to", which means: If you get used to something or someone, you become familiar with it or get to know them, so that you no longer feel that the thing or person is unusual or ...


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-> to pay a visit It does not imply that the visitor keeps lingering there. From the free dictionary: pay a visit pay (someone or something) a visit To visit someone or something. We need to pay Grandma a visit and see how her trip to Florida was.


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I can't think of any specific phrases or proverbs, but I wanted to post an answer just to point something out. I feel like the general idea of "don't worry about your personal status, use it to help others to do better than you" won't appear in too many quotes or proverbs or whatever. That's just because "don't worry about your personal status&...


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Come swing by my place, and I might suggest some other idioms.


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The perfect word (in my opinion) for a brief stay at a place is sojourn. https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/sojourn a short period when a person stays in a particular place: My sojourn in the youth hostel was thankfully short. After a brief sojourn in Holland to study Sanskrit, he moved to India. It is often used with adjectives like &...


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pitstop - often used when travelling, particularly when stopping to get gas, use the restroom, or eat food. We're running low on gas. Let's make a pitstop at the next exit. From Google Dictionary: noun pitstop a stop in the pits for servicing and refueling, especially during a race. a brief rest, especially during a journey. "layover", "...


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"Have a spin" or "go out for a spin" is a rather old fashion way for "go on a short pleasure trip in/on a vehicle". For short visit (in addition to other good suggestions) perhaps "drop by" I dropped by my uncle on Friday, and he took me for a spin in his new car. I suppose "Spin by your place" (as ...


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A whistle-stop is a very short visit. Lexico has whistle-stop ADJECTIVE Very fast and with only brief pauses. He enjoyed a whistle-stop tour of the deanery during which he met all the Anglican clergy. So you could make a whistle-stop at your friend's house on your way to...


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American speaker. dropped in for a few minutes quickly stopped by grab something from {location} come pick me up pick up something from {location} I need to pick up my sister from work. This could include going inside or not. I've never heard "spin to my place" before. Probably regional.


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I would think pop in describes a short visit, as Free dictionary indicates: enter briefly He popped in for two minutes. Here is what Cambridge says: to visit briefly: Why don’t you pop in and see us this afternoon?


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That is proper grammar. But you could maybe say "attacking", but then you have to remove the "at": Ben is held back from attacking the man. As mentioned in the dictionary, the meaning of "attacking" is: launching or engaging in a military or violent physical attack. And for "going at someone" it is: to attack ...


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a growing recognition is an idiomatic expression, which means acceptance/agreement/acknowledgment that is growing/increasing/expanding. Similarly, you can say growing concern/controversy/success/popularity.


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Um, no. An Idiom is a phrase that has a metaphorical (not literal) meaning (for example “Break a leg” … actually means “Good luck”). "A growing recognition" itself is not an idiom an simply means that there is an ever increasing (growing) acknowledgement of the existence, validity, or legality of something (recognition).


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Your first option, how could I not forgive you, feels the best to me. It has a sense of "of course I do", almost like it's out of the person's control - it's not even about what they want, they're sort of compelled to forgive the other person, because they're their best friend, you know? The other two have that sense of wanting to forgive, so that ...


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A picket is a protest by strikers outside their workplace, to prevent others from working there. The use is extended from an old sense in military use of a line of pikemen defending against cavalry. If the protest is intended to stop people from accessing a the government building, then you might call it a picket. A sit-in is another type of protest in ...


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You could perhaps say something like, "I am very grateful for your assistance, and eagerly await your response"


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The word "cake" without any additional qualifiers most commonly refers to something that is large enough to be cut into slices (as in your first image); often some kind of icing/cream is involved but not always. However, "cake" can also refer to a smaller confection such as an éclair, brownie, or American "cupcake" (similar to a ...


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Happy Christmas! A cake does not have to have 'cream on top'. A cake is an item of soft sweet food made from a mixture of flour, fat, eggs, sugar, and other ingredients, baked and sometimes iced (covered with sugar paste) or decorated. Tim Tam is a brand of chocolate biscuit ('cookie' US) made by the Australian biscuit company Arnott's. Some Tim Tam ...


1

One could write "We used to work by waterfall" but it is a little awkward and unnatural in my view. More likely would be: We used to organize our work by the waterfall method We used to use the waterfall method We used to follow the waterfall procedure We used to do waterfall development Any of "process", "system", "...


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'Dawdle' is definitely not an 'unfriendly' word in that it is used informally, often by parents to children. It is not really a 'positive' word though, as the inference is that time is being wasted, so it is probably less common to hear it said about oneself. However, it works fine - an example in the free dictionary "dawdled through breakfast" is ...


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It is typical of the phrase "don't dawdle" as spoken by parents to their children. So it is fine in that context. It is somewhat rarer to use in a positive command, eg "dawdle over".


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You can choose any of those. If you want someone to pick one for you, pick the first one: "sleep". He yawned and rubbed the sleep out his eyes. Blinking, he looked around the room. Yes, the penguin was still there....


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It should be 'on winter evenings'. We use "on" rather than "in" when speaking about a specific date, for example: Yesterday, I watched TV in the evening. I watched TV on the evening of December 21st. Although your example does not specify a date, you do name the season 'winter', which acts as an adjective to the main noun 'evenings', so ...


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If you say this, you're calling the other person an object you're obtaining. There's one other meaning of "scoring" that nobody else seems to have mentioned: to obtain a desirable object. Usually, this is said in the past tense, that you've acquired something like a nice car, house, computer, or something similar. This can be used to refer to ...


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