Skip to main content

New answers tagged

0 votes

Can we have adjectives before objective personal pronouns, for example, "I have some photos of baby him"?

It's a quirky or unusual usage: it's not normal to have adjectives modify pronouns, but it can be done in a playful or colloquial way. In this case, "you" is used as if it was a noun, ...
Stuart F's user avatar
  • 2,470
-1 votes

When can we use "light"as a countable noun?

They might mean shone as the past tense of shine perhaps.
Megas's user avatar
  • 305
0 votes

I'm going to the SHOPS vs I'm going to the STORE (UK vs. US)

In USA, both shop and store are used, though shop is mainly for smaller places, while store is for larger places. Shops is used in UK as the equivalent of what Americans would call a "mall", ...
Megas's user avatar
  • 305
0 votes

Do you say a bad footballer is "... a player with wooden legs"?

This seems to be yet another example of the expressions coined by the non-Native English speakers. Sometimes, such expressions are the direct translations commonly spoken expressions in their local ...
Naveed Ahmed's user avatar
0 votes

Do you say a bad footballer is "... a player with wooden legs"?

I have never encountered the phrase player with wooden legs used in this sense. The only two hits in Google Books have different meanings from the one the OP has described. Lukaku isn't a bad player. ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
1 vote

Do you say "her carelessness leaked into her blood" to express that her carelessness is her essence or habit?

To say something is in [one's] blood is idiomatic. It suggests that something is part of your nature, something you were born with, perhaps an inherited skill or characteristic. Surfing is in his ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 105k
0 votes

Do we call it "a lounge" in a cinema?

You can say "waiting area" or "front" too. These are universal in all English speaking countries. Lounge in Australia sometimes refers to just the sofa.
Megas's user avatar
  • 305
-2 votes

How to say cut in line in British English

You can say "cut in queue", but if you say "cut in line", they will still understand.
Megas's user avatar
  • 305
0 votes

Is it too strong to say "the soup will wash off/ away the lipstick"?

Why Does Lipstick Come Off While Eating? Ever wondered why your perfect pout doesn’t last through a meal? You’re not alone. Many of us have experienced the frustration of lipstick smearing, fading, or ...
Lambie's user avatar
  • 46.5k
-1 votes

Is it too strong to say "the soup will wash off/ away the lipstick"?

I agree with the use of "ruin" or you could also say "mess up" or "smudge" -- Use of "wash off" is silly because it's mostly the spoon that would ruin, mess up, ...
Chris Manley's user avatar
2 votes

Is it natural to say "you should've done the math exercise smartly"?

What you have found is a "shortcut". Or a "quick" way to do the problem. You might recommend that she should "work smarter, not harder" But that is clichéd. As usual, ...
James K's user avatar
  • 226k
2 votes

Is it natural to say "you should've done the math exercise smartly"?

Sorry, but no. "Smart" can mean "intelligent", but "smartly" means "stylishly", like, "Sally was very smartly dressed". Or it can mean "promptly&...
Jay's user avatar
  • 67.3k
1 vote

Do you say "don't play with fire" to a person who is playing with something that might get him dirty?

I have heard the phrase you're playing with fire used to mean "If you keep doing what you're doing, and what I've warned you may happen does indeed happen, you're going to be in big trouble. Don'...
TimR's user avatar
  • 129k
0 votes

Do you say "don't play with fire" to a person who is playing with something that might get him dirty?

I think that idiom is a little too strong for the situation you describe. When you caution someone about playing with fire, it usually implies harm or strife that is more serious than getting dirty ...
swmcdonnell's user avatar
  • 7,572
0 votes

is it correct to say "push the table by its far edge"?

In American English, at least, you might hear Move one end at a time. Scoot one end at a time. Slide one end at a time. Push one end at a time. Move/scoot/etc. one end (of the table) and then the ...
Greg Bacon's user avatar
  • 1,089
0 votes

is it correct to say "push the table by its far edge"?

Pragmatically, we'd say these: (Please look up pragmatics in linguistics) First, it makes no sense. Second, we'd use something like this: Push it from one edge and then the other. Presumably, you are ...
Lambie's user avatar
  • 46.5k
1 vote
Accepted

Curious if there is an idiom for “so as not to deceive”

The title of this question should probably be modified from "so as not to deceive" to "so as not to jinx it". We have an expression with that meaning: "knock on wood" ...
Sam's user avatar
  • 9,640
4 votes

is it correct to say "push the table by its far edge"?

You could say When you push the table, push closer to the corner. When you push the table, push near the corner. "And then do the same at the other end"
TimR's user avatar
  • 129k
3 votes

A is in 1st grade and B is in 2nd grade. Is it offensive to say "A studies in lower grade/class"?

A studies in lower grade/class. A studies in smaller grade/class and B studies in bigger grade/class. Edit Listeners are unlikely to be offended. Nevertheless, we could consider A is in a more ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
4 votes

is it correct to say "push the table by its far edge"?

push the table by its far edge Far edge refers to the edge opposite the one next to the girl; whereas, near edge is the one she has her hands on. We could say push the table by the two ends of the ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
6 votes

are "I will check your homework later" and "I will check on your homework later" similar?

"to check {something}" is to examine it for quality, irregularities, errors, conformity, etc. Check the fuel-line to make sure it's not kinked. Can you check my math? "to check on {...
TimR's user avatar
  • 129k
9 votes

are "I will check your homework later" and "I will check on your homework later" similar?

Yes, that is correct in this context. Checking something usually means validating that it meets some specific criteria (e.g., homework answers are right or wrong). Checking on something usually means ...
swmcdonnell's user avatar
  • 7,572
1 vote
Accepted

Is "watch screens" used to cover "watch TV/ phone/ tablet/ laptop..."?

Screen Time As Jeff noted in the comments, screen time is a common new term used to describe any time a person spends looking at a digital screen, regardless of the device it is on. Here are some ...
Friendly Racoon's user avatar
3 votes

What to say when I'm so excited about a book and read it at crazy speed: "read the book voraciously"?

Summary: this seems reasonable, but you might make small changes. Looking up define voracious, I do find "having a very eager approach to an activity: 'his voracious reading of literature'" ...
Andy Bonner's user avatar
  • 14.2k
4 votes

What to say when I'm so excited about a book and read it at crazy speed: "read the book voraciously"?

One thing you can say is I couldn't put the book down. Cambridge Dictionary has not put something down idiom If you cannot put a book down, you are unable to stop reading it until you reach the end:...
Weather Vane's user avatar
  • 16.6k
0 votes

What is the opposite of "He's full of life"?

A good phrase I can think is drained up Other antonyms for 'full of life' are unenergetic, unenthusiastic, half-hearted, dreamy, lackadaisical, languid, languorous. lacking spirit or liveliness. ...
James Mathai's user avatar
2 votes

What is the opposite of "He's full of life"?

Informally, you could say: I'm not a morning person. ... and everyone would know what you mean!
swmcdonnell's user avatar
  • 7,572
1 vote

What is the opposite of "He's full of life"?

'Drowsy' tends to describe the state of wanting or needing to fall asleep. That isn't quite the right word for how you might feel waking up after too little sleep. The feeling of still being tired ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 105k
0 votes

Idiomatic expression alternative 'to end of the queue'?

Queue is only used for a group of people waiting in the shape of a line. Line would not work either. I would say at the end of that side or row.
Megas's user avatar
  • 305
0 votes

Do you say "stand at the beginning of the queue" the same way we say "stand at the end of the queue"?

Yes, both work fine. You could also say "Queue up at the front" or "Queue up at the back".
Megas's user avatar
  • 305
0 votes

is this sentence too long "stand up the footstool so that it is on its side"?

I would agree with you that when the footstool is lying, it's flat. When it's standing, it's upright. That's why the verb is the important word in the sentence, and the latter part is technically ...
swmcdonnell's user avatar
  • 7,572
0 votes

Is it natural to say "drink it up to this level"?

Edit To follow the OP's preferred method, as shown in the diagram, we could say try to drink [down] to [here] try to drink [down] to this level (My earlier answer didn't go according to the diagram ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
2 votes

is this sentence too long "stand up the footstool so that it is on its side"?

I can see why someone might go with "stand," but it's an odd choice here. If an object has no particular "default" orientation, we would say it's standing if the longest dimension ...
the-baby-is-you's user avatar
0 votes

Do you say "you're very reasonative" the same way we say "you're very talkative"?

As others have noted, "reasonative" is not a recognized English word. You can try using it, of course. There are no Language Police who will arrest you for making up an unauthorized word. ...
Jay's user avatar
  • 67.3k
3 votes

Is it correct to say "a picture of teen Uncle James"?

It's very common to modifying the word "picture" with the event or type of photo. For example, a "baby picture," a "graduation picture," a "wedding picture," a &...
Syntax Junkie's user avatar
-2 votes

Do you say "you're very reasonative" the same way we say "you're very talkative"?

It's a creative analogy - "reasonative" is not a word that I have heard before, but you're welcome to start using it and see if it catches on!
nschneid's user avatar
  • 5,147
2 votes

Do you say "you're very reasonative" the same way we say "you're very talkative"?

No, that's not a recognized English word. If you check the results in Google Books, you'll see that it tends to be an ocr failure of the word "reasonable", or used in philosophy. I'm not ...
The Dark Canuck's user avatar
1 vote

Is it correct to say "a picture of teen Uncle James"?

If you are referring to a baby called Mary, it is not unusual to call them Baby Mary, where Baby functions as a title, similar to Mister (adult male), Master (young male) or Miss (young female) and so ...
Pete Kirkham's user avatar
  • 1,014
16 votes

Is it correct to say "a picture of teen Uncle James"?

You don't specify a dialect, but standard British English would be one of: “…picture of a teen-aged Uncle James.” “…picture of Uncle James as a teenager.” The hyphen in the first example is probably ...
Will Crawford's user avatar
4 votes

Is it correct to say "a picture of teen Uncle James"?

When you say something like "Here's a picture of baby you" instead of "you as a baby", you are highlighting the stage of life over the person. The more recent the stage, the more ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 129k
2 votes

Do you say "stand at the beginning of the queue" the same way we say "stand at the end of the queue"?

Let's use another example: Please pass this to the person at the beginning of the queue. Beginning of the queue is a valid phrase though it is less common than front of the queue. Both constructions ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
17 votes

Is it correct to say "a picture of teen Uncle James"?

"Baby James" is perhaps acceptable, but otherwise "... as a baby" Here's a photo of Uncle James as a teen." (or "teenager") Lots of alternatives such as "...
James K's user avatar
  • 226k
1 vote

Is that part of an Android tablet charger called a connector in a conversation that a mom may say?

The part that extends into the connection can be called a plug or male connector. The part that receives the plug can be called a socket, jack, or female connector. For wall (mains) connectors, the ...
DrMoishe Pippik's user avatar
1 vote

Can I say "I'm so inclined to.." to mean that "I want to do something so badly"?

The fragment I’m so inclined to… has a contradictory tone. On the one hand, as you suggest, so indicates that the speaker’s desire is intense. But on the other hand, implicit in the meaning of be ...
Paul Tanenbaum's user avatar
3 votes

Can I say "I'm so inclined to.." to mean that "I want to do something so badly"?

In very formal language "much inclined" was used, today this will sound pompous or simply stuffy to modern ears. To learners of English I would not recommend imitating this style or level of ...
Mari-Lou A's user avatar
  • 27.8k
2 votes

Can I say "I'm so inclined to.." to mean that "I want to do something so badly"?

No, we don't say "I am so inclined to..." to mean that you very much want to do something. We would use a different word such as "keen" or "desperate", for example I am ...
Weather Vane's user avatar
  • 16.6k

Top 50 recent answers are included