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1

What would be the most acceptable way to notify them? I am assuming you are writing this message in the footnote. I would write "See page 30 for ..." or "See Annex I for ..." You can use the term "appendix" too. Note that in 1 and 2, the comma after "document" makes no sense to me.


0

If you love someone very much, you can say that you are head over heels (in love) with that person. It doesn't have to mean that you spend a lot of time together. The idiom is just to express that you are completely in love. To emphasize how much time you spend together, you can say that you are inseparable: people who are inseparable are always ...


3

In descriptions in novels or articles, one might find: to exchange blows. That is descriptive, but not really conversational. exchange blows to hit each other. But it does not mean to spar (boxing). However, if you want to spar with a friend, you might say: How about we go a few rounds? Do you want to spar?


0

In this special situation, I think the most idiomatic and culturally appropriate question to ask is simply: How are the kids? This phrasing is less intrusive. It does not make any assumptions or convey any expectations about whether or not your friend has had or taken advantage of an opportunity to see his children. It allows him to easily answer in any ...


1

The awkwardness in the three sentences comes from starting with “Here”. One doesn’t say ici apparaît une question pertinente, one says a pertinent question arises here. The quotes are not appropriate, unless you are actually quoting someone. That said, more idiomatic verbs would be raise or give rise to: These points give rise to the pertinent question, ...


0

How does this sound: I "am (unaware of/not sure) what (exactly is/is) on his mind right now", but if I were to guess I would say "he's doing this because he's hungry." I hope it helps.


1

In British English (and I believe AmEng too) there are idiomatic ways of stating specific times on the clock, although these expressions do not necessarily apply when speaking about hours and minutes in general. You can write any time numerically in 12, or 24-hour format: Trains depart at 15:16, 15:46. 16:16 etc How we say those times depends on the ...


2

The idiomatic expression in English related to this is "every hour, on the hour" (with the comma sometimes being omitted, as in: By 2002, the RUC was run every hour, on the hour, producing 12-hour forecasts with a 1 hour temporal resolution. Which means that it ran at 10:00, 11:00, 12:00, etc etc. Closely-related is "every hour, on the half-hour" (with ...


13

What alephzero said (in comment) is also true of US English: "every hour at 16 past the hour." From Merriam Webster dictionary Definition of past the hour used with a certain number of minutes to indicate how long after the beginning of an hour something will happen "Trains leave every hour at ten minutes past the hour." This is more ...


1

You may hear more casual variations of this such as: There are trains at 16 past, every hour. The trains are at 16 past, every hour. Generally, the trains will not be running on the same schedule for the entire day, so you'll often hear this with a time constraint: There are trains at 16 and 39 past, every hour, until 5. There are trains at ...


43

I have seen this written many times on bus timetables etc. and find no reason why someone wouldn't understand it. To be extra clear, I would make one amend:: The train departs at 16 minutes past every hour. Or even better The train departs at 16 minutes past the hour, every hour.


0

Splitting hairs (or to split hairs) is what you are looking for. https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/split-hairs


1

I have worked in such a role. Typically, and specifically, it's called front line support (or Tier 1 support, level 1 support, or first-line support). From "What it’s like on the front lines of support" at Zendesk: Here’s what a few agents on the front lines of our Tier 1 support had to say about their agent experience: … Three things support agents ...


1

Well, in most cases, the person would be "Customer service representative".


1

If you are scheduled to be in two classes (or appointments in general) at the same time, you'd describe yourself as double-booked.


1

Overlapping schedule is not a bad phrase. (Furthermore, neither are some of the other good answers.) That is certainly a phrase that is used. Although, if you know exactly how many items are having overlapping schedules, it may be a bit more common to say a more specific term, "double-booked" or "triple-booked".


24

I had this happen to me a lot at University, and the word in use then was 'clash'. Oh no, I have another timetable clash this semester. or I have to see my tutor; plant biology clashes with statistics on Thursdays


4

From what I understand, you are saying The "Microeconomics - ECON101" class is scheduled at 11 am, and so is "Introduction to Psychology - PSYC101". Is that correct? Well, may be the easiest way to say this would be Both Econ101 and Psyc101 classes are scheduled at the same time. You could also say ... my Econ101 class coincides with my ...


2

I would express it by saying that the classes are "in conflict." Oh no! My math class is in conflict with the English class I wanted to take. Or... That job would be a conflict with another commitment I have.


42

In my experience the most common idiom is a scheduling conflict This can apply anywhere, not just to academics. For example, in a work email: Hi Jim, can we move our meeting to 3pm? I have a scheduling conflict with another meeting at our original time. Thanks. Note this assumes you want to participate in both events. If these classes just ...


8

The classes are simultaneous: occurring, operating, or done at the same time. — Lexico/Oxford Dictionaries Here's an example in use (from a tango site): Saturday July 25th 1-2:15pm w/Anais - Beginner Level - Embellishments for the leader and follower 1-2:15pm w/Carlos - Intermediate Level - Paradas/Barridas (above classes are simultaneous)


4

An order is an imperative instruction, given by someone with the authority to do so, to a subordinate person, often in the context of a 'discipline service' such as a military organisation, or police or fire services. A parent might give an order to his or her child. There will usually be consequences, such as punishment, for disobeying an order. A key ...


2

Consider... 1: I wish you would speak English and 2: I wish you spoke English (where "that" is optional after "wish" in both cases) In many contexts, the two forms would be 100% equivalent and interchangeable (they both reflect a kind of "subjunctive" reference to a "counterfactual" assertion). But sometimes, the first version will be understood ...


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