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1

I'd use the phrase to make one's fortune, which means to become wealthy. (None of the references spell it out, but I've always heard it in reference to making enough that money is no longer a concern.  Of course, people who make a fortune through their own efforts are rarely the sort to stop working at that point, but I'd certainly assume that to be an ...


3

As you say, make a pile simply means that you have made, or are making, a lot of money: it doesn't carry any implications that you don't need any more money. Once you have reached the stage where earning any more wouldn't make any difference to you, you could use the informal expression filthy rich. Note that, while anymore is acceptable as a single word ...


3

I can't address the idiom "make a pile" as I am not familiar with it, but maybe some else can. Here's what came to mind for me: make it (big) infml to become famous or successful: By the time he was nineteen, he had made it big in the music business. (Cambridge Dictionary) make it big To achieve great success and/or fame. My dream is ...


1

I am willing to do whatever it takes to pursue your JD program; your program is the key to unlock my dream of a better career. Not all keys are made of metal; as Wordnik says: key (noun) a determining factor in accomplishing or achieving something. Moreover, many English speakers use the verb unlock when they use the word key in this metaphorical sense. ...


1

"My dream of a better future depends on you" is correct and idiomatic English. "... is dependent on..." is also possible, and you can slightly de-personalise (and so make more formal) by saying "...on your decision." However, I would cut it completely. You should be focussed on telling them why they really want to have a student like you, instead of ...


0

Situation D Someone wants to say something but immediately forgets, and he/she mocks himself/herself: "Oh I just ___(requested word/phrase)" In this situation one might say: I have a memory/mind like a sieve. (= I have an extremely bad memory) Perhaps, something is on the tip of your tongue (you know it (e.g. a name) but you can't remember it at the ...


3

"Silly me!" and variants like "I'm (so) dumb" are often used in the first person. Although I think a simple "oops" or "whoops" are even more common. As an actual name for the event, "having a brain fart" is the most common one I encounter. That said, I think generally people just describe what happened without giving it such a label. "What possessed you??" ...


12

Discombobulated is a nice word that implies temporary confusion.


3

For situation A, I've used the excuse "I guess I can't do math today." Situation B is definitely an example of a "senior moment". While situation D is where "brain fart" could easily be used. The instance of Situation C is more difficult. I can't think of a good word of phrase for that one. About the only thing I can think of is "lose your mind". "Losing ...


7

I quite often use the phrase 'slipped a cog', implying my mental machinery momentarily stuttered. I think I picked the phrase up from a grandparent several decades back.


11

'I just lost my train of thought' can be described in the case that I just forgot what I was talking or thinking previously, it might suit some of your situations. Merriam-Webster's definition of train of thought even includes a sample usage that mirrors what you are asking about: train of thought (noun phrase) a series of thoughts or ideas that ...


6

I very much agree with Andrew, But then: Situation A is a little bit exceptional as, compared to the other situations, it's a kind of "overthinking" issue. I would generally say that in English it's probably a separate word (literally overthinking) For Situations B, C, and D you could say: British English "Lapse": a slip; error to have a blackout ...


38

"Blank out", "brain glitch", and "brain fart" are not mental illnesses. They are all legitimate, albeit possibly crude, vernacular for temporary stupidity. There are others such as "senior moment". This is a facetious reference to the kind of absent-minded dementia occurring in the elderly. I forgot my phone when I left the house this morning. I must ...


2

The answer to the English part of the question is that “Let’s split the check” is acceptable. We might also say “I would prefer to pay my share of the bill.” For more specific advice about how to handle the situation without seeming ungrateful, you may want to look at the Interpersonal Skills Stack Exchange site. Etiquette in specific situations is on-topic ...


0

"Conterminous" is an infrequently used word in English. It is used in contemporary English in technical contexts. For example, the United Stated Geological Survey's book on map projections refers to the 48 "conterminous" states of the United States, to distinguish them from Alaska and Hawaii: The USGS uses the Equidistant Cylindrical projection for ...


1

If the teacher wants to refer to the act of saying her guesses aloud, she could say, "Mandy is verbalizing her guesses aloud more frequently than before."


1

If we’ve offended someone and now by making an apology we need to get them to forget it and forgive us. And then be normal to us i.e. no grudge in heart for us. What sentence is the most suitable? As James comments You can't make someone forgive you. I'll expand on that. You cannot make them Happy and you definitely will not remove their anger by putting ...


1

The context is not very realistic. You can't make someone forgive you. Of the sentences you quote "bring them round" is most idiomatic. You aren't trying to make him happy, or pleased, and "remove anger" isn't idiomatic. However you begin "I should", so you should focus on what you will do, not what the effect is. I should go and apologise, perhaps ...


3

To be honest, both sound perfectly fine. If I had to mark a difference between them, I would say that your second example sounds a bit more professional, like a question being proposed in an interview. Also, there is a mild difference in natural answers: "What new features of C# have you used?" In this case, you could honestly answer this question with ...


1

The normal use (at least in my experience, I have a technical/scientific background) is to say the interval as the elapsed time between events that happen with a known frequency. So if interval is the reciprocal of rate then we might think that frame interval is the reciprocal of frame rate. However in regards to video, this does not appear to be in common ...


1

Frame duration? This quick Google Search gives quite a few people who are using it in support questions for video editing, and here is a definition on the website for the Institute for Telecommunication Services: frame duration: The time between the beginning of a frame and the end of that frame. Note: For fixed-length frames, at a fixed data rate, frame ...


1

One would only say that the patient was asked to perform the test, if the test was one that the patient could self-administer. For example, there are now (and have been for a good number of years) blood-sugar tests where the patient punctures his or her skin, applies a drop of blood to a special test strip, inserts this into a meter, and reads off a blood-...


3

You may use "conversely": If n is even then n squared is also even. Conversely, if n-squared is even, then n is even.


0

Consecrated bread, water might serve if you're referring too Catholic tradition. The term sanctified might also be useful. J.R.'s answer here suggests which has been blessed blessed which is also good as well as holy. These are good, simple words. I would advise caution with religious terminology as it's fairly easy to mix up claims of religious ...


1

Try Holy water Holy water is water that has been blessed by a member of the clergy or a religious figure. Holy Water


0

It is not idiomatic. There are lots of possible ways to phrase this. If you just mean that two events occurred: I passed the exam and left school. If the exam was the cause of you leaving I left school by passing the exam. You can use a participle phrase Having passed the exam, I left school. Or you can use the verb "graduate" which means "...


4

You can try one of these: water over which holy words have been read water that has been blessed water upon which a holy man has breathed


1

The comment is correct but the purpose of the slogan need only be clear to you based on your intention. I would take #3 A better world. Such slogans work on similar words (better/better) or somewhat similar sounding words (bigger/better). These form a couplet that is easier to remember and then sell. You could also add a few words to change the direction ...


1

What do you call something that's the inverse of something? I am not quite sure what you are looking for as there are a few alternative answers. A noun would be oposite or from your description, possibly more accurately would be exact opposite. It could also be flip side However, we could also use idioms like like chalk and cheese, Yin and Yang, mirror ...


2

"Jumping up to the ceiling" is not an idiomatic expression, but there are a number of others related to being in an elevated position: jump for joy be on cloud nine be flying high be walking on air be over the moon be in heaven be on top of the world and various others. Also for general interest, there's "dancing on the ...


0

Here probably arises a pertinent question as to why he would want to be a bio-engineer now, if he didn't like mathematics at school? In English, the typical order is subject-verb, and not verb-subject. Switching them: "arises a pertinent question" sounds unusual. "Here" and "now" seem redundant. They are both saying the same thing. Remove one of them. "...


1

The threads of [the victims]`s clothes remained behind, stuck to the shards of broken glass. Something like that should work.


0

“Setup work environment” and “Configure development environment” are both understandable and idiomatic. The latter emphasizes the new employee’s role as a developer, is more specific, and is thus likely the better choice. Setting up the work environment may suggest other necessary but less important tasks like obtaining office supplies, arranging physical ...


1

These are fine. With "names" of tasks you often use "headlinese", and drop particles and articles. The main function is that the name should be clear, short and easy to understand and remember, rather than "idiomatic". As part of a text or in speech, you would normally use "the". It isn't needed as a "headline". However you may want to use a different ...


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