New answers tagged

2

Yes, "in good hands" is a well-known and widely-used expression to mean that something is "in the care of a person or people who are able to take care of someone or something well". It would aptly describe a well-run business. The adjectives you used in your question (competent, trustworthy) describe the person running the business. You ...


3

One of the best words for your blank is joking: I’m not joking - she sent me a slide deck like 8 hours later. — Pediatric Support While this has a slightly different connotation than BSing, it's often used as an exact synonym when you didn't say anything particularly funny but people might think you were exaggerating. Same for "not kidding". Also ...


4

The process is called pilling and the bits are called pills or lint. https://www.rd.com/article/how-to-de-pill-sweaters/ You can buy small devices for trimming the pills away.


2

Using random like this is informal and slangy, but it can be used to mean "arbitrary", "undistinguished", or "unspecified" in some contexts. These meanings may come from American hacker culture; the placeholder name J. Random Hacker was in use at MIT as far back as the 1960s, and the "Jargon File" dictionary of slang ...


4

"Tuck [it] down" doesn't make sense. Either you want to tuck it in, or you want to fold it down. But, to be honest, it doesn't matter if it is tucked in. Only the most paranoid micromanager would care. What is important is that the envelope isn't sealed (so it can be reused, I suppose). For internal mail, don't bother to seal the envelope.


2

The thread of a story is the sequence of events which cause the story to make sense; we don't call the individual incidents 'threads'. You could say that your daughter had lost the thread (singular) of the story because she forgot to mention that Snow White's mother had died or the particular reason why her stepmother was jealous of her.


0

Yes, you can use the construction something turns somebody off something. The verb 'turn off' is a transitive separable multi-word verb, meaning that you can place the direct object between the words and use an indirect object. For this answer, I am referring to the meaning of 'dislike' (and not 'switch off'). For the usage you are asking about, it generally ...


0

This is a perfectly acceptable use of the phrase "mix and match". There's nothing wrong with it, and likely not a lot of ways to improve your word choice here. At first I thought gotube's comment about some aspect of your question being a "red hair-ing" was a bad sign (because "red herring" is a phrase often used to describe ...


0

An American would say "six-to-zero" or "six-to-nothing" or "six-zip". They wouldn't generally talk about goals, as it is understood from the context--the score of a soccer match is the number of goals for each side. However, most soccer fans would certainly find "nil" understandable. And yes, "there is a first ...


Top 50 recent answers are included