New answers tagged

0

As SegNerd says, you can use "rotate 360 degrees." Another option is "rotate through 360 degrees." Either one is grammatically correct. But any option that introduces the idea of measuring the extent of rotation (via degrees, radians, or any other measurement) changes the meaning of the sentence. It is possible to have some device, like a ...


3

The correct phrasing would be The casters allow the chair to rotate 360 degrees. It is not correct to say “360 angles.” There are always an infinite number of angles. Even a chair that can only rotate 30 degrees has an infinite number - rotate it 15 degrees, or rotate it 15.1 degrees, or rotate it 15.01 degrees, or rotate it 15.001 degrees, and so forth. ...


3

(At least to me as a native American English speaker...) "Under my chin" is more natural. "In my neck" sounds like it was somehow inside the neck itself (that is, under the skin), and doesn't immediately conjure the image of how you were holding it in the same way that "under my chin" does. "Against my neck" would ...


1

The definition of "floated" that applies is To offer for consideration; suggest: floated my idea to the committee. I don't know the exact nuance of the Hungarian, but I assume you want to express that you made a proposal to see how someone might react to it instead of making a firm proposal to ask someone to decide yes or no. You could use "...


1

You could use "raised the idea" or "raised the prospect." But "floated the idea" is not slang, nor would I classify it as very informal.


1

You may be looking for either the term “progress report” or “report card”. Wikipedia describes report cards (which seem to be called just reports in British English): In most places, the report card is issued by the school to the student or the student's parents once to four times yearly. A typical report card uses a grading scale to determine the quality ...


2

I think a negative here might be more appropriate (at least given common speech patterns). I would recommend something like "without resorting to coercion" In short, although he could have come by force, he desired to come without resorting to coercion. A few free critiques I would probably omit "Jewish" since synagogues are by ...


4

"as a guest" (or "by invitation" or "as an invited guest", except "invite" was used earlier in the paragraph so won't sound good here). "Invited" or "guest" go together. If you're invited somewhere, you're considered to be their guest. Likewise if you're a guest, it means you've been invited. A &...


5

I'd prefer "peaceably". "By peace" or "through peace" don't seem to work. Peace isn't the method of gaining entry but a consequence of a method that doesn't involve force. For me, "in peace" suggest "with the intent to be peaceful after arriving. Yet this is probably the intended answer since "come in peace&...


5

through peace doesn't work because peace is rarely perceived as something spacial you can metaphorically go through. Fundamentally, through means from one end to another, and peace is more of an abstract concept/idea/state free from war and violence. You might say through a peaceful settlement through a peaceful discussion/dialogue through a peaceful ...


1

Despite doesn't go well together with even to show a surprising contrast. Despite the fact that/In spite of the fact that his passive vocabulary is not great and his comprehension is rather low, ... Despite of/In spite of [him] having a small vocabulary and comprehending things slowly, ... Personally, I would use Even though/Though/Although his passive ...


1

This is an interesting question! First, we should separate the two elements of the phrase: "viral" and "meme." Virality is a term developed in the Internet era to describe a specific thing that spreads very wide very quickly. You might encounter a viral meme, or a viral meme template, or a viral video, or you might even say a specific ...


0

The DJ turned up just in time to appease the crowd. If she didn't come in time, it would have degenerated into a full-blown riot. There is a slight difference between *turned up in a timely fashion" and "turned up just in time"; the latter suggests a higher sense of urgency and is preferred; from the context of this passage, especially the ...


0

Some of the more informal ways of saying scolded/rebuked/chastised would be: a) Gave a dressing down b) went Ballistic/Postal on c) tore into / tore a new one d) bawled out P.S. These are mostly used in everyday conversation in the U.S.


0

There are loads of phrasal verbs that mean to hurry something along, perhaps to ensure that something happens on time, such as "chase up", "hurry along", or "chivvy along" (NB the latter is chiefly British) but I can't think of one that specifically means "to arrive in a timely fashion". Thing is, a phrasal verb is ...


3

"Spinning" is fine for a general description. In the game, this move is called a "Spin dash". So if you are talking about the game you could say "spin-dashing".


1

There probably isn't a single word or phrase that will capture all of these without any ambiguity or confusion. You might want to include some examples in your questionnaire along with that question. "Organizational Unit" is used in a similar setting to address the problem you are describing. More info & examples here: https://en.wikipedia.org/...


1

First of all, not directly addressing the question, but about "met": "I haven't met Jack for ..." is a bit awkward putting "met" in present perfect tense like that and specifying a duration. Plain "met" sort of implies the initial meeting/introduction, as in "I haven't met Jack yet" (but I hope to one day, ...


2

"Once, on one Monday" doesn't sound particularly natural to me. I would say either "Once, on a Monday" or "Once, one Monday". Something like "Once, on one particularly dreary Monday" would sound better, although even there I would probably prefer to either omit "on" or change "one" into "a&...


1

It's OK, although many native speakers might say 'Once, on a Monday...". Also, it is completely normal to say that she 'got, climbed, or stood on the desk'.


1

You could describe is a "'for the want of a nail' situation". For want of a nail the shoe was lost. For want of a shoe the horse was lost. For want of a horse the rider was lost. For want of a rider the message was lost. For want of a message the battle was lost. For want of a battle the kingdom was lost. And all for the want of a horseshoe nail. ...


4

I wonder if I can coin a phrase like mathematics nazi to represent someone who cannot bear any freedom with regards to mathematical notations? Yes, this would be readily understood. As a colloquialism it would probably be abbreviated to "math nazi" (US) or "maths nazi" (UK). There is also some variation in practice regarding the word &...


1

As someone who does have an irregular sleep schedule due to sleep disorder, I simply use myself (and also have been wished) "good night" and "good morning" regardless of the time of day. After all, I'm not taking just a nap, I'm having my "full night's sleep", even if it's noon outside the window. And my morning is when I wake ...


1

Sweet dreams Sleep tight (The origin of this strange phrase is that in medieval times beds were wooden frames with ropes across them. To stop the ropes stretching too quickly, you would de-tension them when you woke up and re-tension them at bed time.) Not Good rest or good sleep. Not in Britain anyway. That's very clunky.


-1

You could perfectly say good rest or good sleep.


2

When I was on a team that sometimes was called upon to work well into the night, coworkers often bid one another farewell with "Good work" (meaning, work is done) or "Rest well" (meaning, I'm not telling you must go to sleep now). When we were feeling ill-used, folks might say a snarky: "Enjoy your time off" (as if being allowed ...


7

First thing that came to mind was good rest, or have a good rest.


45

"Good night" will be understood, if he is heading to bed directly. "Sleep well" or "Sleep tight" would fit better, but is more familiar. Bob's spouse might use this, but his coworkers probably wouldn't.


3

It depends what kind of candy you're talking about. When you say "comes from a candy" that can be ambiguous: do you mean a purely hard candy that has melted, or a candy "shell" that contains liquid inside it? Purely hard candy Example: Jolly Ranchers, Gobstoppers/Jawbreakers Candy juice is not idiomatic at all. "Juice" is a ...


6

"Setting the table" means laying out the plates and utensils. It might also include setting out the table cloth, setting out any center piece to be used, etc., depending on the formality of the meal being prepared for. It does not include bringing food to the table. The act of bringing the food to the table is called "serving the meal". ...


0

Snatching victory from the jaws of defeat is a relatively common expression meaning: to take a situation that was going badly and make it have a good outcome. That deals with a specific situation (a sports game, a political race, an exam) and not so much a trait which could be an advantage or a disadvantage. Every cloud has a silver lining is a saying that ...


0

It doesn't sound idiomatic. Usually I hear "hold your head high" as positive, but I can imagine some alternates: I will make you hang your head in shame. or close to what you said "make you not able of" but a bit more idiomatic: What I say will make it so you cannot hold your head high in public. Above is a bit more concise so more ...


1

For the first question the language I typically encounter is "advance": "You won't advance to 2nd grade if you don't learn this math." For the last, in typical US usage at least that is called "held back": "John was held back a year in 4th grade."


1

You could also call them the first two runners up


1

Loose piece of linoleum Loose strip of linoleum Loose sheet of linoleum Loose linoleum tile If you don't know the word for linoleum, you can call it whatever you want. Thingy Tile [as linoleum is also made up of tiles] Whatsit Whatchamacallit etc. etc. etc. Parents have all sorts of ways of referring to objects with their children. Linoleum is a ...


1

Say "the thing". People would understand that you didn't know or couldn't think of the word. You might call the thing in the picture a "flap" of loose flooring. Wictionary give this definition for flap. Anything broad and flexible that hangs loose, or that is attached by one side or end and is easily moved. You would normally only talk ...


1

I'd say "The boy is turning the table around and around." or "The boy is turning the table round and round." As others have said: the boy is turning the table around You would probably think that he is turning it just one full rotation or less. "around" is not needed and putting it just once suggests 180 or 360 degrees. the ...


2

The table is angled towards the wall. This sentence is fine, but "towards" implies that one corner is too close to the wall and that it should be corrected by pushing that corner away from the wall. To remove that implication, either: The table's angled to the wall. or The table's at an angle to the wall. Do use the contraction "table's&...


1

Is Alibaba talking to a genie? In fact, is Alibaba talking to anyone at all?? If he is alone in a cave he probably just doesn't talk. Or if he does begin to talk to himself, he would say "اريد ان اخرج" If he doesn't have a Genie, he would be more likely to say "I hope to get out" or "I want to get out". Using "wish" ...


1

"I hit him by surprise" would be fairly natural, or "I sucker-punched him." but not "I sneakily hit him”" (the last might be "I hit him from ambush" or "I snuck up and hit him from behind")


2

That is a play on the common proverb Early to bed and early to rise makes and man healthy, wealthy and wise (https://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/early-to-bed-and-early-to-rise.html) so you can't really ask if "late" is used properly. The article is making an argument that although the proverb might be true for most people there are some who do ...


0

You could say a creatively stifling environment, they spoon feed you (I don't think this is right for your context), they molly-coddle you, or patronizing/paternalistic company. It depends on exactly how they are stifling the innovation? Is it a Kafka-esque bureaucracy, is it the hierarchy, is it the stagnation of the company, is it lack of respect for a ...


1

Stop snooping around. I've heard it used mainly in the context of infidelity, e. g. going through someone's messages. But it sounds appropriate here as well.


3

A) What is a toy from the East? [Grammar FINE, meaning, NOT FINE, for the multiple choice given. A top A butterfly Blocks To answer A), you have to say something like: A toy from the East is Oriental. What is a toy from the East? It is: Oriental Asian Indonesian None of the above Very cute A top, a butterfly, blocks [all unlikely but grammatically ...


3

Which toy is from the East? or Which is a toy from the East? The former implies all options are toys, the latter suggests there might be different sorts of things with a toy among them. Which is preferable over what when there is a fixed set of options.


-1

Consider the word marginalia (marginal notes, at the edge or margin of something, which is peripheral to the bigger picture already mentioned in @Brad answer), Instead of addressing the specific subject directly, he looked at marginalia, although somewhat related to the subject in question. This word may not be of common use although it well addresses the ...


3

When one says "you must be very hungry", one is saying, in effect, that one is forced to conclude (by evidence or information or how you look) that you are very hungry. It doesn't make sense to ask for confirmation from the other person that you must conclude that. You could say "You are very hungry, aren't you?"


2

you have to wind the watch all the way to the end you have to wind the watch all the way clicked you have to wind the watch all the way until you hear a click you have to wind the watch all the way until you feel resistance Sentence 1 is grammatical but not really idiomatic. Even if the winding does eventually complete or come to a stop, it sounds strange ...


2

A phrase that might work is to be out the money, which means to be poorer by that amount, or have lost that amount. For example, All you have to do is refuse to turn that steel over to me. and I'm out a million dollars a day. Dropping a regular cheap bulb package means that I'm out a dollar or less. But if I drop a fluorescent, I'm out four or five ...


1

No, "ear-splitting" applies to the noise, not what it's doing to you. No, you wouldnt' say "you're splitting my ears". "Ear splitting" is a phrase used to describe sounds, not to say what those sounds are doing; you can't split it up and remain idiomatic. If your shrieking children are hurting your ears, you might say something ...


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