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curler is a synonym of roller. According to OALD and Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English: She put her hear in curlers at night. her hair was in rollers/curlers.


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You took your laptop / radio to a library & you plugged its cable into a socket & there was no power - what would you say in this situation? I would say that the socket is dead, or isn't working. This is because I would first assume that the problem was with the socket. We tend to know if there is a power cut because lights go off, air-conditioning/...


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You put hair rollers in your hair. "On" normally means "atop of" - like a hat sits on top of your head. When something is in amongst the hairs of your head, we use "in".


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Your paragraph is awkwardly phrased. I might say something like this: I do some of my best thinking in bed at night, when the lights are out and all is quiet. Reflecting on the events of the day, I concluded that my boss and I have different priorities. Since I couldn't sleep, I contemplated my options for tomorrow.


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totter and stagger are what you want, for instance: He staggered home, drunk and intoxicated.


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Sure you can call that swinging. make regular movements forwards and backwards or from one side to another while hanging from a particular point. That would seem to fit here and its certainly not the case that the object must be suspended from above. Doors can swing open, for example. If you want to tell your child to stop swinging on the bed, normal ...


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The expression using the plural grounds is approximately twice as popular today as the singular ground. However, Google Books Ngram Viewer indicates that detained on the ground is much older than the plural version and until the turn of the millennium, was also much more popular. However, it's always detained on THE grounds and not on a ground. So if you ...


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Normally you don't need to mention it. The shoe is on the floor (implies the usual position) If it is necessary you can "right way up". Put the box down the right way up, or you might damage the contents. It is also possible to use "not" Do not put your jumper on inside out, it will be uncomfortable. "Upright" might work in some cases, but to me ...


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Literally the opposite of "in the dark" is "in the light": I moved out of the darkness and into the light However, it isn't natural to say "I'm in the light" in the same way we say "I'm in the dark". Darkness is an absence of light. We tend more often to refer to the kind of light we are in, for example: Don't run around in the dark - you should ...


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The most common way to refer to the opposite of being in the dark is 'in the know'. But note that 'in the dark' in the form of your examples "we're in the dark just as much as you are." and "College officials were kept in the dark about the investigation" express a metaphorical darkness, not actual absence of light. So your "You may bump into objects if you ...


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Do we say "you need good manual dexterity" or "you need to be skillful"? Yes. You are eating a apple, your mom could say "fruit is good for you" or "apples are good for you" manual dexterity is simply one skill among many. The wording of 'manual dexterity" is a bit formal and and almost medical so you probably wouldn't say it to a small child but I ...


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I would call that entire device "a power strip with a long cord." If the fact that it has a long cord isn't important, I would just call it "a power strip." On the other hand, I might call the whole device "an extension cord," since it serves the purpose of an extension cord. I would call the three parts of that device "the plug" (the part that plugs into ...


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The socket is the holes, the place where you would plug something in. The cord is the wire that extends. You can also refer to the entire thing as an "power strip" or "extension cord" more generally if you're not talking about any specific part.


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When talking about things from other cultures, you have to consider your audience. For most situations, "deathday celebration" is not a natural way to talk about this. The trouble is that it sounds like you are celebrating the person's death. In fact you want to say that you are celebrating the person's life, or remembering the person when they were alive. ...


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I found the answer It is called "Death anniversary" or "deathday". It is the anniversary of the death of a person. It is the opposite of birthday. It is a custom in several Asian cultures, including Armenia, Cambodia, China, Georgia, Hong Kong, Taiwan, India, Myanmar, Iran, Israel, Japan, Bangladesh, Korea, Nepal, Pakistan, the Philippines, ...


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"Box" is probably fine. But "pack" is also possible. If you mean just the coiled up string and not the plastic container then also "spool of floss"


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Yes, picture 4 is upside down. I would call picture 3 lying on its side. I would use sideways if the cart was moving in the direction of one of its sides, maybe because someone was kicking it out of the way. As to picture 2, you would have to say something like it is tipped up on its handle.


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You've asked for a general term to describe a piece of religious text placed on a shrine between the Chinese gods Tudigong and Caishen. The text itself might be termed an inscription. As it is on a piece of wood, it may also be called an engraving. Depending on the content of the inscription, there are some generic terms for religious texts such as a ...


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Again, assuming this is the toddler, remember that they don't speak English. Look Isabel, you've messed up the mat. It's all crumpled (or rumpled) (or folded up) (or lumpy etc). Let's get it flat again. {demonstrate with toddler how to flatten a mat}. Now be careful next time. It will probably only take about 50 times of telling her for her to start to ...


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I was walking down the road and I accidentally stepped in a big pothole. Holes like this are called "potholes" and "dropping a leg in" would be "stepping in the pothole". You need to adverb "accidentally" if you need to make that explicit (but if you don't mention it, people will probably assume it was accidental).


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This is the sort of technical term that builders would know, and most people don't use, especially when talking to toddlers. You would focus more on underlying idea "don't touch dirty things". Talking to toddlers is fundamentally different to communicating with adult native speakers. They don't speak English. No, Isabel, don't touch that, it's dirty. ...


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Yes, all of those would do. Do you need to mention the cardboard container? I bought my mate 24 cans of beer for his birthday. It might be more natural not to say whether they were in a box or not. "24 beer cans" could be empty cans. But in context, nobody would be confused.


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Stem or stalk is fine. Actually not all fruits do have any remnants of the flower persisting at the other end; tomatoes don't, for instance, and neither does the pepper in your illustration. I can't think of any colloquial name for that part of an apple; if you needed to refer to it, it would probably be as 'the remains of the flower' or something. ...


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The phrasing I would use is "to put batteries in," as in "You need to put batteries in the car to make it work." (Of course, a young child might not realize that you have to put batteries in a particular place in the car, in a particular orientation. You'd have to show the kid "the right way to put batteries in.") Saying "put batteries into the car" ...


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You could also say "all of the above" instead of saying "all of these things". Example: All of the above mean that another decision should be taken regarding this matter.


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Dredge has a rather nasty connotation and wouldn't be used for food. Scoop may be right here, but I like the other user's suggestion of scrape. My recommendation would be to rephrase the sentence like this: I am hungry so I scrape as much of the left-over food out of the pot as possible. This is easier to understand, as I feel that you were trying to fit ...


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Legs: "Keep your legs closer (or close together)." Keep your legs close together with your feet lightly touching each other. (Yoga Poses: Speedy Study Guides) or Don't keep your legs apart (like that). (Ludwig) Note: a) "Far apart" is mainly used in the exercise context as an instruction what to do: "Sit with legs far apart." and not to say what ...


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It's called a hand sanitizer. Also alternatively: a hand antiseptic, a handrub, a hand rub. It is a cleansing agent for your hands.


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Either: a safety helmet or hard hat.


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My preferred dictionary has this definition for the verb to whip: beat (a person or animal) with a whip or similar instrument, especially as a punishment or to urge them on. So yes, the verb can be used for any weapon, not just "a whip". Interestingly, hitting someone with the butt of a gun is called "pistol-whipping".


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It is generally called a lanyard. lanyard a cord passed round the neck, shoulder, or wrist for holding a knife, whistle, or similar object.


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In everyday English we shake water from our hands (or feet or hair) but flick it from our fingers. And we usually speak of having wet hands, not soaked ones: perhaps because - as Kate Bunting says - the skin doesn't soak up water; though hair does, sort of. If it isn't clear from the context - from their existing friendliness - that the child is doing it ...


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I found the answer, it is called "threshold" threshold [count] 1 : a piece of wood, metal, or stone that forms the bottom of a door and that you walk over as you enter a room or building He stepped across the threshold. When they were married he carried her over the threshold. [=he picked her up and carried her into their home when they ...


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The correct term is: Trouser Leg - the leg of a pair of trousers I know you were probably hoping for a one word answer, but I don't believe there is one. Note that in the US, you may use "pant leg" instead. The following sounds most natural to me: Put your leg through your left trouser leg


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Well .. they're both called Grandma but based on this a common solution is to call grandparents by their first names ("Grandpa George", "Grandma Anne", etc.) or by their family names ("Grandpa Jones", "Grandma Smith"). In North America, many families call one set of grandparents by their ethnic names (e.g., Hispanic grandparents might be called abuelo and ...


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In the United States, what you describe is called "Wite-Out", pronounced as white-out. It was invented and trademarked some 50 years ago and comes in different forms. There is Wite-Out tape and Wite-Out pens. More generally, these things are called correction pens (using correction fluid or white-out) and correction tape.


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Usually we refer to both an arrangement like this and an art representation of that arrangement as a "still life". Typically it is composed of inanimate objects--classic examples are bowls of fruit, flowers, flowing fabric, etc.


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