New answers tagged

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Gradual re-pressurization to normal (or ambient, or 1 atmosphere) would be understood by vacuum chamber folk and everyday folk. Breaking vacuum is terminology used typically by people dealing with vacuum chambers. "Removing" something from vacuum would result in virtually instantaneous re-pressurization. How would one gradually remove something ...


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There's probably more than one way to express this idea, but one common one is pet theory. As the Collins English Dictionary puts it: Someone's pet theory, project, or subject is one that they particularly support or like. [link] This is not exactly the same as what you describe, in that a person could have come up with a theory but not actually support it,...


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The adverb "urgently" has a very similar meaning to the prepositional phrase "with urgency". So you could use either in this context. I'm not quite sure that "urgent" is the right meaning. Perhaps "right now" or "right away", or "without delay" would fit the sense better. "Urgently" ...


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The comments offer: Universal panacea Which directly fits what you're trying to communicate, but certainly isn't common. I personally like the phrase: Catch-all solution You could also use something like: Universal solution Solution that is universally true


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I think the version most similar to your original sentence structure of runs <adverb> is: The boy is chased by bees and he runs frantically


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SWING RIDERS or RIDING THE SWING: Are the cowboys that ride the sides of the main body of the trail herd keeping them together and keeping them moving


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There is a case to be made for 'in fact' to be formal and informal. My view is that formal use would be as the start of a sentance. informal use, such as in speach, would be to drop 'in fact' within a sentance to add emphasise. So much like a lot of English it is the use that determines if it is formal or informal.


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I would say "100% correct" means "indisputably correct". Ironically, I think the phrase "100% correct" is itself 100% correct. I am speaking rhetorically. Of course, there is nothing to stop anyone disputing my interpretation. Richard Mullins


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I would say "100% correct" means "indisputably correct". Ironically, I think the phrase "100% correct" is itself 100% correct. Richard Mullins


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I would say "perfectly correct" or "exactly correct." Using "100%" is weird because it's not something that can be quantitatively measured (or even defined).


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The sentence It is the 100% correct pronunciation of 'mischievous' you just heard in the video is grammatical, but it is ambiguous, and it is unidiomatic. It is grammatical because it agrees with the rules of how English noun phrases can be constructed. The pattern of the 100% correct pronunciation of 'mischievous' can be analysed as DETERMINER + ADJECTIVE ...


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"I'm adamant that you need plenty of therapy until you learn to" toe the line. Wikipedia states: "Toe the line" is an idiomatic expression meaning either to conform to a rule or standard, or to stand poised at the starting line in a footrace. Its modern-day use includes [...] the context of behavior where the miscreant is expected to &...


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Echoing others' answers: whether or not it is "correct" by some standard, it would sound completely fine in an informal setting, and might sound a bit silly in a more formal setting. That is, as others have already noted, the assertion cannot be literally true, because that alleged literal true statement does not admit precise parsing. But in ...


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In a friendly situation, "100%" is often used in place of "completely" or "absolutely" or "perfect". For example, calling a hamburger "100% delicious". It's a funny metaphor suggesting that a deliciousness-meter would bang the needle at the far side. People might even say "110% delicious". But in a ...


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If I had to refer to those specifically, I would call them tines. 1 : a slender pointed projecting part : prong as in "Look, my hairclip has a broken tine." This word does seem to be in actual usage, for example in US Patent US7066185B2: The legs each have a tine base and a number of curved tines...


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Understandable? Yes. Almost all English natives would understand your intended meaning. Correct? I'd say so. Some might argue that it should be an adverb like "fully", but if it's correct to say that something is 100% correct, I don't know why it wouldn't be correct to use that as an identifier. Proper? Not really. There's nothing "wrong&...


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When French speakers say "Juste une précision", they mean: "Just a clarification". I don't know what else to say about this. :)


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‘100% correct’ is grammatically correct in this context, though the organization of the sentence is a bit atypical for many more formal dialects of English and may be difficult for some people to understand without having to think a bit (I would instead restructure things as suggested at the end of Astralbee’s answer as that resolves both issues). However, ...


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Sure, "teeth", "claws", "prongs", "grippy bits"... There's No well-established term that I am aware of, though there may be one used by hairgrip designers and manufacturers. It is just not something that comes up in everyday conversations very often. Oh look one of the grippy bits has broken off my pink hairgrip. ...


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Some English speakers feel that '100 per cent' is overused as an expression, especially in connection with things that cannot be measured. For example, you couldn't say a pronunciation was '87% correct' - how could that even be measured? But in colloquial speech, '100%' is often used to mean 'completely', and '99%' (or sometimes '99.99%') to mean 'almost'. ...


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I wouldn't say thanks all the same, for the reason you stated yourself: it implies that you had asked for help. Instead I would shortly explain what I am grateful for: grateful for this serendipity/happy accident!


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sort compares strings differently from awk This phrase carries extra meanings beyond the differences in how the command sort and the command awk handle strings. It can also mean that sort compares strings differently when received from the output of awk. I would avoid it for that reason. sort compares strings differently than awk This phrase is more ...


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The related phrase that would work best here is "have a story read". Hannah wanted to have a story about wild animals read to her. But allow for context Hannah wanted to be read a story about wild animals Sounds clear and meaningful. I would understand this without problem, and I don't find it particularly strange.


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"Hannah wished to be read" does not make sense—a book is read, a person is not. You could say "Hannah wished to be read to about..." Similarly "wished to listen about..." doesn't really work. Again, you need an object: "wished to listen to a story about..." would be correct. As a native speaker I would say neither of ...


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While "put down" and "lay down" are common prepositional phrases, they don't have anything to do with the position of an object after it has been placed. To be absolutely clear, you can say: "Put the onion's sliced surface in contact with the cutting board." The standard, brief way to phrase that is: "Put the onion cut side ...


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None of those suggestions sound idiomatic. This may be more of a science matter than an English language matter, but I don't think an apple can absorb water. An apple's skin is waterproof and watertight - that's why they float in water. Your suggestions 'soaked' and 'soggy' generally imply that something has taken on water. 'Stale' tends to mean the opposite ...


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I think the sentence, "I pressed the brakes" has an undertone that the action was performed from hands There's no such implication. It's well understood that when driving a car, the brakes are normally applied with the foot. You can also say I stepped on the brake. I applied the brakes. I braked the car. If writing for an American audience I ...


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I have upvoted Rob Jarvis’s answer. However, if we go beyond the original question of what is “proper” into what will most easily be understood by the most people, I would change the vocabulary. Make a back-up copy daily and keep it until four days after it was made.


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First, I would rephrase "Daily backup" to "Backup daily" since the more common construction of a command is verb + adverb, not the other way around. "Daily backup" is too easily read as a noun--which it is--as in, "Have you done your daily backup today?" Second, up to 3 recent days is not idiomatic, which is why you ...


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