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1

This is what many older people will think of as a pillbox. Note the shape.


4

This is a another attempt at a "launch and leave" sentence. It's correct but it ignores the presence of another English speaker who can understand context or respond if they need more information. Just say Don't force it. As noted in a comment, the specific phrase for when threads don't align is "cross-threaded". So you could add It'...


0

"Display stand with base" looks like the description in a catalogue, or an online site like Amazon. In "conversation" there is more context and you'd probably call this "a stand" unless having a "base" is particularly important. In fact you probably wouldn't refer to it at all, it is just implied by the context: I ...


1

"Off-the-shoulder" is a good way to describe the sweater in the picture. For the advice to a daughter, you don't need to put everything in one package. Lots of your questions ask for a way to say something but assume that the other person doesn't exist and won't respond. Instead you can just say "Sweetie, don't stretch your tee-shirt." ...


1

You ask for "common in the language" but none of these movements are common, so the description of them won't be common either. For the first one, crawled is probably fine but if you want to explictly exclude hands then "walked on their knees" For the movement when lying down, again it is very rare to want to descibe this. It depends on ...


1

It is neither: Ladders have rungs that are climbed and are straight, stairs have steps that are walked. This has neither. Colloquially it would be understood if you referred to it as either, or called it the entrance. This however doesn't fit into those, the gaps are footholds and it fits closer to some kind of shallow climbing wall, a child would climb or ...


3

Correct, the reflexive "yourself" isn't required. "You may roll onto the floor." It certainly doesn't sound like the way most people speak to children, you would expect a dialogue: What are you up to :-) ;-)? rolling. okay, well, be careful then. why? You don't want to roll onto the floor. I'm not going to do that. alright then. with &...


0

"Under your nose" in my experience. Especially given its usage is pretty much limited to telling people that there's some food or the like on that part of the face.


-1

Each jigsaw piece… We say jigsaw puzzles are made of pieces. …is shaped like a dinosaur We use the copular verb, like, to connect the subject (each jigsaw piece) to its predicate nominative (a dinosaur). Each jigsaw piece is shaped like a dinosaur The OP could mention that the pieces are handcrafted, which is a strong selling point. The OP and Lambie's ...


-1

The shapes in my puzzle are all elephant shapes. The pieces of my puzzles are elephant shaped. [not before a noun] Elephant-shaped pieces are hard to fit together. [dash if before a noun]. In English, something is or isn't a shape. In English, we don't usually say: "have the shape of". There is an idiom: x takes the shape of y. But that is ...


1

If you knew for certain it was broken, you would say “you broke it”. Other common expressions, given that you’ve already described the problem/state (i.e. the car won’t start), would be: My car won’t start - you’ve done something to it! My car won’t start - what have you done to it?! This basically avoids the presumption inherent in saying “you broke it”, ...


4

The word “expound” would be appropriate for conveying the idea that someone is speaking in great detail: expound present and explain (a theory or idea) in detail.


1

Tear the wrapper open by the side to take the straw out is fine - I think by sounds a little unusual here (most people would probably say at the side or on the side, or maybe from) but it works just fine! Tear the side of the wrapper off to take the straw out also works - your English is fine, but what you're describing might sound unusual to people. Tear ...


0

I am looking at the picture and see no zig-zag line. I do see a corrugated or ridged side. If that is where to open, I'd say Tear the ridged side to open.


1

Lexico has this definition for 'family man': A man with a wife (or long-term partner) and children, especially one who enjoys home life. ‘I'm very much a family man and need to be close to those I love’ It's very natural these days to change the gender of expressions like this, so 'family woman' or the gender-neutral 'family person' would be widely ...


0

"I'm adamant that you need plenty of therapy until you learn to be like ..." Perhaps "a normal human being" or "a decent human being", "a decent member of society". (And perhaps either delete "like" or replace it with "more like".)


2

Visit Jack and Mary. Visited Jack and Mary. Using a noun Paid Jack and Mary a visit. Note It's not impossible that someone be called Marry but a more likely name is Mary.


2

I think 'turn on' is a little unnatural but you could use 'put on' instead. Of course, 'play' is also correct. Can you put on that song we heard earlier? (turn on) Could you play the video from timestamp 12:32? (turn on) I'm going to put on some videos about travel. (turn on)


1

What is the rub surface that we stick the strap on to do up the sandal called? This is commonly referred to as Velcro, which is a trademarked name. The generic term is "hook-and-loop fastener," but this phrase is widely seen as technical and may not be understood. do we say "stick up the sandals" (for sandals that are similar to the one ...


3

Is it correct to say "The bolt has an external male thread" and "The nut has an internal female thread" It is technically correct but redundant. A bolt is a threaded male fastener, and the thread will always be on the contact surface, which is the outside for a male fastener. Similar for a nut. "This nut doesn't fit tight on this ...


0

"Have the shape of" isn't really the best way of saying what you mean. If you have something that belongs to someone else then you have the actual thing, or it is identical. For example, if someone says "I have my father's nose", it means their nose is identical to their fathers. A wooden toy isn't exactly the same shape as a real ...


2

"Off" isn't used for extreme examples, but for things that are slightly deviant. "A bit off" seems like the usual expression. I've never heard "very off". None of your examples under "not acceptable" sound right to me with "off" as an adjective. (I'm a US speaker. Maybe a British speaker will have a different ...


0

No, it is not wrong. It is understood to mean "Wipe all the stuff off of his paws before he comes in." If the dog had his paws on the table, "Wipe his paws off the table" would be grammatically correct, but would likely be misunderstood to mean to wipe something off of his paws rather than to get the paws off the table. Much more likely ...


0

I think the word you are looking for is erudite. “ I'd like to have a erudite saying on my profile page. What comes to your mind?”


1

Adding to Michael Harvey's comment, you can say to either "scratch" or "pick at", since both refer to using your fingernail to pry at the lip between the surface and the object in question. Once you have a small bit of that object lifted (referred to as the edge in this example), you can then utilize your original phrase "[and] then ...


0

When stitching 'suturing' a wound, the thread is usually carried through itself in a knot, each of these is one stitch.


1

Almost right, but each time the thread goes between the two pieces of fabric or skin that we wish to join, it's a stitch. We use the number of stitches as an indicator of the severity of the wound. To describe your photograph, you would say He had to have 13 stitches in his head.


2

Something smells burning in the kitchen is not idiomatic in American English. The problem is that "smell" is not just a linking verb. It is also a transitive verb. I smell smoke in the kitchen does not mean that my odor changes when I enter the kitchen. As Samuel Johnson once said when a lady told him that he smelled, "No, madame, you smell;...


1

"Buck-toothed" would be quite insulting if used to describe somebody. It also specifically means that the teeth are angled forwards, protruding. Another term for this is an overbite (eg "she has an overbite"). The people in the photographs don't look like their teeth are angled forwards - they simply have prominent (not protruding) teeth. ...


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