4

This is not the verb to want in the sense of to wish for, but in its older sense of to be lacking in. The related noun want means the same as lack.


4

Yes, it is wrong to say just “clean” in that context. To give the additional sense of removal you want, you need to use the phrase verb “clean up”. For example: Little Oscar pulled handfuls of soil out of the potted plant onto the floor. I used a dustpan and brush to clean up the soil. [I cleaned the floor, but I cleaned up the soil.]


3

No, we don't. Pieces of broken glass are often called shards https://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/shard We would only use crumb when speaking of a non-food substance if it was something with a soft texture similar to bread, such as rotten wood. For stone or (hard) wood it would be chips or fragments.


3

The phrase doesn't mean that the other person isn't nice, it just means they will take advantage of any small mistake or liberty. For example, someone living in a house where the landlord has said "No pets!" They ask the landlord to make an exception because they really want a cat. The landlord agrees, and the next thing the tenant has four cats and two dogs!...


3

It is idomatic to talk about pushing something partly or completely into something else. Insert a garlic clove into each hole and push completely into the meat. However, I would note that "do not push the straw completely into the box" is rather adult language to use to a toddler; I would rather say 'don't push it all the way in!". Also those ...


3

The people are lying (down) across the (railway) tracks. The cat is sprawled (rather than lying) across the spindle securing the legs of the stool. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spindle_(furniture)


2

I can best illustrate the difference by examining the actual language of an analysis of an actual novel, Summer Will Show by Sylvia Townsend Warner. All we have to know about the plot is that Sophia, an aristocratic Englishwoman, ends up in Paris in 1848, a year of revolution. Sophia forms a relationship with her husband's mistress Minna, whose death in the ...


2

"Plot twist" is an extremely common phrase referring to a revelation in a story that's intended to be surprising and change the way previous events are interpreted. A character you thought was nice might turn out to be the mastermind villain, a pair of archenemies might turn out to be brothers, or a sizable portion of the story might turn out to have been a ...


2

'If need be' is an example of a grammar fossil. The non count form of 'need' and the subjunctive verb 'be' are both old usage. At one time, that would have been the usual way to say 'if a state of need exists'. The phrase has remained even as grammar has changed. It is appropriate in formal English. There are plenty of similar short phrases. You probably ...


2

This is the entry from the Cambdridge Dictionary for tear tear verb (PULL APART) B1 [ I or T ] to pull or be pulled apart, or to pull pieces off Note the I or T there... it means that the verb can be transitive "she tore the dress" or intransitive "the dress tore". It is therefore perfectly OK grammatically to say "it tore from the wall". It ...


2

How about Don't tilt your head so far back when you drink from the bottle (keep it level) (Similar to Kate's comment on the other answer)


2

All three of your sentences are grammatical in English. But please note, when the subject of the sentence is "you", it has the tone of an accusation: the transmission of the disease was an action done by "you." It would be more neutral to use the passive voice, or to put yourself (I) as the subject of the sentence. It is also pretty confrontational to use ...


2

I think this is partly a theological question rather than purely a language question. I'm going to assume you understand the theology aspect and know what you are trying to express in language. In English, there is a distinction between "pray for" and "pray to". Prayers are directed to a god or deity, and what you pray for is the subject matter of your ...


2

Your definition of rainy means 'a period when there are frequent showers' (a lot doesn't refer to heavy rain). So if rain is falling now we say "It is raining". There is normally 'some light from the sun' in the daytime. A sunny day is when the sun is strong and there are few clouds in the sky. "It has sunlight" is not idiomatic English. We can say "The sun ...


2

You're right it sounds clumsy (imo) but it's not technically incorrect - tear can be an intransitive verb (no direct object) so, for example, "the cloth tore from top to bottom" is perfectly fine.


1

No, Tom. One doesn't do that here. I'm keen to try it though and am already compiling a list of songs I think might do the trick.


1

As others have said, the general word for a broken piece of glass is "shard". You could also say "fragment", "chip", or "broken piece of glass". Those words could apply to almost anything solid. "A fragment of glass", "a fragment of wood", "a fragment of bone", "a fragment of copper", etc. (You wouldn't use these words for liquids.) Small pieces of wood, ...


1

When glass, porcelaine or stone breaks, it usually shatters. What you get are shards (larger pieces) and splinters (small, often longish pieces). If you talk about crumbles, I imagine very small pieces, typically created not by just dropping the glass, but for example by stepping on the glass or otherwise applying extra force, creating finer particles than ...


1

We normally clean windows, clean the car, clean the floor etc. which means freeing from dirt and dust something that is dirty. So, telling a child to clean their pee, which is a grammatical sentence, is literally asking them to wash their pee. Orbital Aussie's answer is therefore correct but I'd prefer to say “clean up the floor” or “mop that up” (mop up ...


1

The second option is more natural sounding to me (as a native English speaker). The first sounds curt, and comes across as perhaps a little 'lazy'. The third sounds stilted - the extra word adds nothing, and makes the sentence slightly harder to enunciate. However, this might be used in a more formal situation. Hope that helps, Alan.


1

The “of” is optional - that is, both sentences are possible grammatically. The version without “of” sounds much better though. But both sentences are not natural and easy to read. For example, the “online” concept is effectively repeated by using both “website” and “online” (every website is online). You repeat “online” and “food ordering” at the end of ...


1

As you found in the dictionary, "shame" is a feeling that a person can have. "Being ashamed" is having that feeling. "Shame on you" is a statement saying that the listener should have that feeling. It's short for "you should be ashamed of yourself" and this is what fits in your scenario. This isn't related to English, but please ask yourself first if this ...


1

Though both are common, I think may depend on the gender. While shirts are common with men, females may go with top as they have more varieties. Seldom we hear that He was wearing a nice top. More common is He was wearing a nice shirt.


1

Imagine that painting is glued the the wall with super glue. You can't just take it off the wall like if it was hanging from a single nail with a string. You have to pull the painting out very hard, possibly tearing/ripping/damaging the painting in the process. When you "tear the painting from the wall", you pull it off the wall very hard and/or violently.


1

The cliché "if you give an inch they will take a mile" is a warning that someone will take advantage of you. In your context it is warning that you should not be "kind" to your opponent. One can imagine, in a game of chess, a player might make a deliberately poor move, because they think it will open up the game and make it more interesting. But she won't ...


1

Wiktionary states: A feeling or sense. It is the same meaning as in: Apparently, this user prefers to keep an air of mystery about them.


1

While both expressions are idiomatic, call a taxi is far more common, as illustrated in the Google Books Ngram Viewer below. The expression call for is generally used in the sense of required. To say that this calls for a taxi means that a taxi will be required - as opposed to a bus or a bicycle for example. If you needed to make a phone call to get a taxi,...


1

*You'd better have followed his advice? *You'd better haven't followed his advice? Neither of these is idiomatic or logical. "You'd better" is a warning, expressed in a hortative mood. You can't warn someone about something that's already happened. You can only warn someone about a future event that may or may not happen. It would have been better ...


1

You'd better have/haven't followed his advice No - those are ungrammatical. It would have been better if you'd followed his advice It would have been better if you hadn't followed his advice Yes - those are both fine. A slightly old-fashioned, but perhaps more elegant, way to put it would be: It would have been better had you followed his advice ...


1

It looks like a euphemistic version of shot to shit. I can't say that it's common, specifically the shit → sunshine part. But in the right context, it should be understandable. This usage of shot, to shit, and shot to shit seem common enough to me. And I would say the UD entry is fairly accurate: when something has worn out, been ruined, gone bad, ...


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