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41 votes
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Is it idiomatic to say "I have to race with time" to mean I have to do a thing very fast and finish it before something bad might happen?

The idiomatic expression is "race against time". To race with something or somebody can also mean you are competing against them, so arguably it does mean the same thing. But idioms are ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 104k
22 votes

Is this a school badge?

You'd probably get away with "badge", since that is clearly intended to be a cheap alternative to a sewn-on badge. The word "badge" is used for marks and tokens (worn on clothing) ...
James K's user avatar
  • 224k
19 votes

Is this a school badge?

A 'badge', typically, is something that can be attached to something else - for example, the badge on the front of a vehicle which displays the manufacturer's emblem is often a removable/replaceable ...
Astralbee's user avatar
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16 votes
Accepted

Why did the authors use the phrase "the quantity of people" in these examples?

Realistically, there are no contexts where a learner should think of using "the quantity of people" or "the amount of people". Use "the number of people". There will ...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
7 votes

Why did the authors use the phrase "the quantity of people" in these examples?

In all three of your examples number would be correct, and quantity, while not technically incorrect, is awkward. The two words quantity and quality are often contrasted, and perhaps there are related ...
Peter's user avatar
  • 7,057
6 votes

Is this a school badge?

I would definitely call this a badge. Chambers has "badge: 1 .A mark or emblem showing rank, membership of a society, etc.". A badge does not need to be a separate object, although the word ...
timchessish's user avatar
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4 votes
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Synonym for "turn around" in the given context?

breakthrough Merriam-Webster A) a sudden advance especially in knowledge or technique a medical breakthrough B) a person's first notable success — often used before another noun a breakthrough novel ...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

What does "a cat is crawling" mean?

A bee is an insect, a lizard is a reptile (which you could have looked up for yourself). We often describe such creatures as 'crawling' rather than 'walking' simply because their bodies are close to ...
Kate Bunting's user avatar
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3 votes
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Is it correct to say "the hem came unsewn"?

You can say "came unsewn." It is idiomatic and well attested. The hem of her long dress came unsewn as soon as they got out of the station.
TimR's user avatar
  • 127k
3 votes
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Does it make sense to say to a person "you're good to go" when he is done with something?

That's fine. It's a typical casual expression so I don't want to over-analyse. It means that she isn't prepared or ready to go play until she has finished her maths lesson - that finishing maths is ...
James K's user avatar
  • 224k
3 votes

Do you have idioms with "as simple as ..."?

Sure, one can make a distinction between "easy" and "simple". Like I've often said that losing weight is simple: eat less and exercise more. Is that easy? No. Is it simple? Yes. ...
Jay's user avatar
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3 votes

Can I say "I'm so inclined to.." to mean that "I want to do something so badly"?

In very formal language "much inclined" was used, today this will sound pompous or simply stuffy to modern ears. To learners of English I would not recommend imitating this style or level of ...
Mari-Lou A's user avatar
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3 votes

Do we say "skip doing something" such as "skip cooking breakfast"?

There are certain verbs that can only be followed by a gerund or an infinitive. Others only take the gerund and still others only take the infinitive. They have to be memorized. Many of these verbs ...
Lambie's user avatar
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2 votes

Is it idiomatic to say "I have to race with time" to mean I have to do a thing very fast and finish it before something bad might happen?

"I have to race with time" is not idiomatic, but here are some options that are: I have to race the clock. I have to beat the clock. I have to beat my record. I have to beat my best time....
Friendly Racoon's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

Is there the phrase "have an experience + to do something" correct? Is the phrase "learn about something. from ..." correct?

We learn about things from books. That is, preposition from casts "books" as a source of information. Preposition with would cast them as tools or implements. But your rationale (referring ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 127k
2 votes
Accepted

How to express a door opens / closes at different ranges?

The only idioms are "crack" and "wide" You can open the door a crack, or you can crack a door open. In both cases it means that the door only slightly open. You can also use this ...
James K's user avatar
  • 224k
2 votes

Is there an alternative to "the quality of something being..."?

When you’re looking for a word or term but can’t find it, it’s always a good idea to bear in mind the option of rearranging the sentence. Here one possibility is I think it’s more important that the ...
Paul Tanenbaum's user avatar
2 votes

Do you say "he makes money selling saliva" to mean he makes money out of his talking skills?

Unlike some other proverbs and idioms, this one doesn't translate well. In English, saliva is not particular associated with talking. It is associated with eating "He salivated at the sight of ...
James K's user avatar
  • 224k
2 votes

Is it better to replace 'could be' with 'they could' ---'They stood chatting together as easily and naturally as could be.'?

The adverb/adjective distinction has no bearing on this question, and "as easily and naturally as they could" is not an accurate paraphrase of "as easy and naturally as could be". ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 127k
2 votes

I am capable of accessing trains easily because I live close to a train station. - does this indicate an ability still?

No, able to does not refer only to physical or intellectual abilities. Consider, for example We’re unable to accept your gracious invitation because we’ve promised our daughter we’d watch her ...
Paul Tanenbaum's user avatar
2 votes

I am capable of accessing trains easily because I live close to a train station. - does this indicate an ability still?

Capable of normally refers to your physical or intellectual ability to do something, not to an ability resulting from the fact that you happen to live near the railway station. So I would consider (1) ...
Kate Bunting's user avatar
  • 55.6k
2 votes

Is it correct to say "the hem came unsewn"?

The idiomatic standard is... The hem came undone (about a dozen hits in Google Books) Note that although it will obviously be understood, Google Books reports no hits at all for the highlighted 3-...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
2 votes

Is it natural to say "you don't want me to lose face, do you?" in this situation?

The former, a negative question about a positive proposition, is perfectly fine. The latter, a positive question about a negative proposition, has a somewhat accusatory tone. That’s because in each of ...
Paul Tanenbaum's user avatar
2 votes

Is "think on your feet" used with positive or negative meanings?

I don't see how thinking on one's feet can be seen as negative even in the OP's second example. If you need to give an answer in an interview, you just have to do it, and the only way is to think on ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
2 votes

How to use "devoid of" correctly

A place is devoid of something. It was midnight and the stadium was devoid of fans. You can use the word figuratively of a person: On that medication for hypertension she felt empty, devoid of ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 127k
2 votes

Can I say "I'm so inclined to.." to mean that "I want to do something so badly"?

No, we don't say "I am so inclined to..." to mean that you very much want to do something. We would use a different word such as "keen" or "desperate", for example I am ...
Weather Vane's user avatar
  • 16.6k
1 vote

Is this a school badge?

I'd call that an insignia. Cambridge: an object or mark that shows that a person belongs to a particular organization or group, or has a particular rank.
the-baby-is-you's user avatar
1 vote

Is it natural to say "you don't want me to lose face, do you?" in this situation?

An alternative might be Please don't let us down. Cambridge Dictionary has let someone down to disappoint someone by failing to do what you agreed to do or were expected to do You will be there ...
Weather Vane's user avatar
  • 16.6k
1 vote

Why did the authors use the phrase "the quantity of people" in these examples?

It is simply much more common to say "number of people". You are very unlikely to go wrong by choosing the word "number" rather than "quantity". The NGrams search in this ...
David K's user avatar
  • 3,177
1 vote

care of or care for

The second one is correct because care as a noun is normally followed by of, but as a verb by for. The expectant parents were taught about the care of a newborn baby. The new parents were taught how ...
Kate Bunting's user avatar
  • 55.6k

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