23

The pairing of "basically literally" is very colloquial/informal and skews young. I hear it moderately frequently, mostly when people are recounting stories about personal interactions. It means "I am emphatic that my description conveys an accurate feeling of a moment/interaction, but it isn't literally true--I am exaggerating or simplifying for story ...


20

It is the other way around. "Guess what! Adam and Eve got married today." To show your surprise, you can use "No kidding!" Guess what! Adam and Eve got married today. No kidding! See Merriam Webster: —used to show surprise or interest in what has been said "My brother got engaged last month." "No kidding! That's great news!" Edit: Lambie ...


9

As a Native English speaker, we usually use the phrase "guess what" to introduce a new piece of information, usually to challenge the person we are speaking with to attempt to tell us what we are about to tell them. Examples include: "You'll never guess what happened today!" or "Guess what I saw today!" The way you are using it is not native and most ...


5

No - "guess what" is not an expression of surprise. You may be thinking of "I never would have guessed!"


5

If the subject "pulls out" a gun, he is removing it from a holster, it at least from some concealed place. If he had the gun in his hand and they were both concealed in his coat, you could say He pulled out his gun and fired. If the gun is already out, he can't pull it out again, but you could say something like He raised the gun and fired. Or He ...


3

First of all "silef" is not the word "files" backwards. That would be "selif". Version 1 of your sentence is structurally correct but doesn't make sense. Don't use the word "version", because that implies that "selif" is some kind of acceptable variant of the word "files" - it isn't. There are no different versions of words, and a word written backwards is ...


3

This is extremely informal and slang! It's also extremely recent new use. It likely derives from the phrase "I just can't", meaning "I am very frustrated and just can't continue to engage with [this specific thing]". Hence, "I just can't with you", meaning "You are very frustrating to me (ongoing) and I just can't continue to engage with you." (The ...


2

As a sports fan, I have heard this expression used many times for as long as I can remember. Instinctively, I know what it means: pull out (phrasal verb) to win a contest, particularly as a surprising upset or as a result of a surprising comeback That's why this phrase is commonly found in news stories such as: The Patriots overcame a 25-point ...


2

My answer has less to do with the phrase itself (which is perfectly fine as-is), but more to do with your method of verifying the correctness of a phrase. As you probably know, when Googling something in quotes, only exact matches are returned; slight variants are excluded. If one phrasing returns less than a dozen hits while another returns thousands, ...


2

There are lots of possibilities, including the following: So as not to forget (about it) In order not to forget (about it) To remind himself (about it) To remember/recall/recollect But for not to forget is NOT colloquial, as you note.


2

Pull out a gun Pull (out) a gun (on someone) to bring out a gun or knife suddenly so that it is ready for use against someone. The police shot the thief when he pulled out a gun. When you pull out a weapon you usually have it concealed at your waist or under your belt. You can't pull something out of your hand unless you're a magician, then you can ...


2

Both these phrases can be used to send the social message that you are making a friendly greeting. In other words, they can be used phatically. Used so both phrases mean the the same, but the social propriety of each may differ. In general, "How are you" is formal, always polite, but perhaps a bit too stiff for close acquaintances in any casual context. "...


2

No, but you can say: "Huh." (very different intonation to "huh?") "How about that..." "Really!" "You're kidding [me]!" And since I'm Australian I have to provide the obligatory: "b**ger me"


1

I think that have the greater knowledge in this context means know something more important than what's already mentioned. It is a simple fact that books burn- that a physical book can be destroyed by fire. But the knowledge contained in a book lives on in the heads of people who have read it, so even if you try to control knowledge by destroying books, you ...


1

It's not clear from your question whether the absent someone has declined to join the group for a social outing or has failed to turn up to support a cause for which the group was rallying. If the latter, then the metaphorical use of the word heart to indicate feeling or emotion is apt. The use of heart to indicate innermost feelings goes back to the origin ...


1

"You can't help but have your legs tremble" doesn't sound right, because when your legs tremble it is involuntary - you don't actually make it happen. The word "have" between you and your legs suggests that you are compelled to make them tremble. For example, "You can't help but have your mother make you a sandwich" doesn't make any sense - it suggests a ...


1

What you've written conveys what you want, especially since you're talking to a child. A phrase like "have a little rest" is very informal, which suits the setting; "a little rest" is the kind of phrase I imagine being used only to children, or to adults who are ill. A more formal way to say "have a little rest for a few minutes" would be "rest for a little ...


1

This is precisely meaning 3 in the Oxford Learners': (also used as an exclamation) used to tell somebody that an action, a suggestion or a decision is acceptable ‘Bob wants to know if he can come too.’ ‘That's fine by me.’ "Fine by me" is a phrase that simply means "I think that's acceptable".


1

The word is usually used in the plural, that is because most "make-up" is a mixture of substances, and when using make-up most people will use several types (foundation, blusher, lipstick etc) The use of the singular is rarer, it refers to a single substance that improves the appearance of your face. In this example, rice starch is a cosmetic, and is among ...


1

I'm British, and to me it would sound like a mildly sarcastic way of expressing that something set up as a surprise is not actually all that surprising.


1

Neither can be correct as an exclamation. There are some idiomatic exclamations which seem similar: What a goal! This has the form "What a (noun)". But your attempt isn't in this form. How about that! Your examples: How she looks. This isn't an exclamation. It is a little noun phrase meaning "The way that she appears". But it doesn't tell you ...


1

Every sentence needs a verb. Neither of those have one, so they are both not really normal grammatical sentences. But we say them anyhow! Speakers of English might say "How great she looks!" in conversation, but this is really more like a shortened form of the question "How great does she look?", except it does not expect an answer. You really need ...


1

I agree with others that this is generally said by younger people for emphasis, exaggeration and creating excitement. "Basically" means they are presenting the information in it's simplest form, cutting out detail, and getting to the bottom line. A person will often begin a summary of some happening or event with, "Basically, ...". It can be used for ...


1

I agree with Em. that recently, "literally" has been used primarily for emphasis, especially by younger people. However, in cases where it is used for emphasis, I find you can drop it without changing the meaning of the sentence at all. In response to "Can you go pick up some bread?", "I literally just got back from the store" means the same as "I just got ...


1

They're both fine. In such contexts, any is usually just an optional "intensifier" - which can be further emphasized by giving the word extra stress... 1: Will you please stop asking to borrow a few pounds? I already told you, I don't have any money! But there can be another significant difference in meaning. Consider... 2: I don't have alcohol in my ...


1

"Or is it?" is an idiomatic phrase used to cast doubt on the previous statement. Sometimes it is stated as a new sentence as in your example, or sometimes as a prefix to the statement it questions. For example, "The End... Or Is It?" is a popular 'ending trope', that is a way to conclude a fictional story in a way that seems final but leaves possibility for ...


1

Both are fine. What is on the table? tends to imply that you know that there is something on the table, and want to know what it is. What is there on the table? does not have that implication: there might be something and there might not. The implication I mentioned is not strict: you might still use the first even if you don't know whether there is ...


1

Come out as a winner is fine grammatically, but rarely said by itself - it's rare that you will be commanding someone to "come out as a winner." Something like this is far more typical: You'll come out as a winner if you do this. All he wanted to do was come out as a winner, and that's why he trained every day. This phrase also may simply not be ...


1

They are very similar. However "this once" implies that the event is a one off unlikley to be repeated, whereas "this time" implies the event was in doubt or unlikely but does not suggest it will be unique. So in: "The poker player had claimed to have a full house last hand, but this time he really did." we are not saying anything about any past or ...


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