3

In a way describes the manner in which someone did something. "I styled my hair in a way that made it look thicker." In a state describes the condition someone or something was in. "The room was in a state of confusion." Wet up to the knees clearly describes someone's state, so it's unnecessary to include the words in a state.


2

Just to clarify, gapped teeth usually refers to the space between the two front upper teeth (incisors). Whereas if someone or their mouth is described as gapped-tooth, it can mean that one or more teeth are actually missing If you describe a person or their smile as gap-toothed, you mean that some of that person's teeth are missing. I rarely hear “dense ...


2

No. If you are not "gap-toothed" then your teeth are touching each other. But the hairs are never actually touching at the root, and if they are long enough they will always touch at the end, because hair is bendy. If you talk about "gaps" in the hair, I would understand that to mean actual bald spots. Areas of skin where no hair grows at all. You would ...


2

For "take (something) apart", people almost always talk about the complete object, because that is the current or starting condition, and it's also just easier to say (usually fewer words, etc). But "put (something) together" is a little different. In this case, you actually can talk about either the completed object or its parts, but the two do not mean ...


2

NO "Fraud oneself to the office" is neither grammatically correct nor idiomatic. First, "fraud" is a noun, not a verb. Second, "to the office" sounds like you are going to work. "Into office" is used when referring to obtaining a government position. An idiomatic way to say this would be "get into office by fraud"


2

"... on that one though..." means "... about that subject, though ...", or "... as to that matter ...". It is referring to "... second one...", that is, the second subject, the partnerships with KBOR, that has been brought up by Speaker 2. This material may remain difficult to understand because it is a transcription of speech between speakers who know ...


2

It seems that "off" vs "off of" is largely a matter of preference and there is some debate about it. For example: https://grammarist.com/usage/off-of/ https://www.grammarphobia.com/blog/2009/12/is-off-of-so-awful.html It seems that "off of" is often considered either redundant or incorrect depending on who you ask. It also appears to be more common in ...


2

How old are you in this picture? is OK (the picture shows you at a certain age). If you use the past tense, it's better to say How old were you when this picture was taken?


2

Neither of your suggestions works, I'm afraid. "In a state of that is soaked" is not grammatical. If you remove "of" you get "in a state that is soaked". That is grammatical, and sort-of meaningful, but logically it says that the state is soaked, not that the tooth is soaked. Sometimes we say things that don't work logically, but this is not one of them: ...


1

I will write an example sentences; My english teacher gave me a homework yesterday. The homework given by himself was very hard. I couldn't finish it on my own, but I was alone at home. There was nobody to help me with my homework.


1

The use of "etc." (and its period) I don't think are really a problem. This is fairly common (and correct usage) and most people will not be confused by the use of a period in an abbreviation in the middle of a sentence. There are a couple of comments I would make on other aspects, however: First, you should have a comma before "etc." as it is a separate ...


1

All elephant's tusks are of ivory, so referring to them, I would just say "elephant tusks". If a smuggler had a bag of elephant tusks, one could say that he was smuggling ivory. I wouldn't say "an elephant has two ivories". I think all elephants have two tusks, unless they have lost one or both, so I wouldn't say "This elephant has two ivory tusks"....


1

The answer here is shown by the verb tenses you're using for the rest of the sentence. (and you did get the verb tenses correct, BTW, which many people don't, so good job on that!) Before I know it, I will become his slave. This is perfectly correct, but it is a future tense sentence. It says that you will become his slave in the future, and that when ...


1

The specific expression "go over big for" is not that uncommon, but also, I think, a bit of a special case. It is, in my opinion, sort of a cross between "to go for" (to be interested in) and "to go over big" (to be enthusiastically received), so it essentially means "to become enthusiastically interested in (something) when it is presented to (some group ...


1

No. "Drying up" is idiomatically limited to kitchen things. The dictionary intends a limited meaning when it says "plates, dishes etc" - you should treat that "etc" as referring to crockery, cutlery, glasses, mugs, pans, etc; not hair, car, etc. Drying up is the counterpart of washing up, which we also only use for plates, dishes etc. We say "She's ...


1

There appears to be no clear preference recognised by English speakers. I guess there are some technical nuances about using "I" as a subject versus "My Work", but for all practical purposes, the two sentences have the same meaning and are completely interchangeable. And those two are not the only options, either: commonly heard around the office is I ...


1

Your first example is not correct. I hope that you read books as many as I do. Structured like this it doesn't make any sense, bceause "as many" appears to be operating on the verb "to read" when actually it refers to the number of books. You could say "I hope you read books as often as I do", because "as often" is the frequency with which you read. I ...


1

No. The correct expression would delete the "what": "Jack does to Fanny exactly the same as Fanny has done to him." To keep that "what", you would need put another at the start of the sentence: "What Jack does to Fanny is exactly the same as what Fanny has done to him."


1

Sure, but a subject must have been established or it won't have any meaning. "Are you sure there aren't any UFOs?" "I'm as certain as can be." "Is he sure the stock market will fall?" "He's as certain as can be."


1

Please don't be disheartened - I think it's great that you're teaching your son English and working to improve your own! - but your situation and choice of words may get you some strange looks or even laughs if your son says these things in public. "Suckle," as pointed out in the definition you found, is usually used for animals. Saying to the average ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible