4

The two locutions have quite different meanings. Do X in your own time means to do X at any time you find convenient. Do X on your own time means to do X at some time other than when you are being paid (or legitimately expected) to be doing Y.


4

They are both idioms, and, generally speaking, they mean completely different things. Out of my mind out of one's mind [Merriam-Webster] : not sane : crazy // What a ridiculous idea! You must be out of your mind to believe that. This is often used more figuratively than literally. People are often said to be out of their minds with grief or worry. Out of ...


3

Although I have never heard the term kneepit before, if it is in common usage in your region, I do not see anything wrong with the above statement. In the US, this statement would be more commonly expressed as, “She is tickling the back of my knee with her toes.” Or, “She is wiggling her toes in the crook of my knee.”


3

Tuck is a perfectly common word. Practically everyone here in the English speaking world will understand what tuck your shirt in means.


3

parents' bracelet concerns From: Dr. Linley McAnalley, a family friend, saw Huck’s hand and said he was lucky his mother pulled the bands off. “The bands, if they’re worn too tight for too long, can create a tourniquet type effect and can interfere with the blood flow into and out of the hand,” McAnalley said. “The blood gets stagnant in the hand; blood ...


3

Having watched the clip, it seems to me that "You're on" has nothing to do with the preceding dialogue. They have tried to stop Rachel from taking the flight because Ross wants to make a declaration of love to her, and Phoebe tells him "You're on" meaning "This is your moment to speak."


3

Yes, it would be correct. The choice of "here/there" depends on the position of the speaker relative to that of the jumper.


3

Sure. You are congratulating them, and you feel a desire to congratulate them from deep in your heart. It's a perfectly reasonable thing to say.


3

It’s a common way to express that you think the other person is lying or talking nonsense, that you don’t believe what they are saying. The common idiom in Britain would be: February, my arse! Some will remove the profanity, and say something like: February, my foot! There are many such “polite” variations of this, and there is often an awareness that ...


3

The phrase "much to his despair" is a variation of the phrase "be the despair of". This sentence is saying that because this person's friend went back on his word (going back on your word is when you break a promise or you fail to uphold a commitment you made), it caused this person's friend despair. In this sentence, "despair" ...


3

"In a way that caused him to feel despair." The friend's going back on his word is the reason for his despair, and so (by definition) it contributes much to that feeling. Much to his surprise and much to his dismay are also common variations on the same formula, as well as their plainer versions without "much": to his surprise and to his ...


3

It's "save the date". "Safe the date" is a malapropism, like "for all-intensive purposes" (for all intents and purposes), "make my words" (mark my words), etc.


3

In short, I can tell you, yes, they are. The meanings are similar, as follows: I can tell you that yada yada declares that I have in my power to make a statement ("yada yada"), implying that I know the facts of the matter. It is not a speech act: I do not actually tell you, I only explain that I'm able to. However, in practice it is used to make ...


2

Your suggestion doesn't quite sound idiomatic, although it is understandable. We don't often say "savoury food", except to make a distinction from sweet foods. Telling someone to eat savoury food seems too broad. Depending on the point you are trying to make (ie whether you are concerned about the lack of variety or vitamins, or simply disgusted by ...


2

I am jiggling the objects on the plate: Free Dictionary verb (used with or without object), jig·gled, jig·gling. to move up and down or to and fro with short, quick jerks. noun a jiggling movement. jiggle You can only bounce softish objects on a plate, like a rubber ball. Not a hard object. Hard objects such as stones and die cannot be bounced on a plate. ...


2

It depends on what the objects are, the thing they're located in, and how many times it is done. If it happens multiple times, you might be bouncing the objects: [Merriam-Webster, from bounce] transitive 2 : to cause to rebound or be reflected     // bounce a ball     // bounce a light ray off a reflector intransitive 1 : to rebound or reflect after ...


2

"You're on" means it is your turn to talk. I guess it is said when one has to speak in a microphone. You're on means the microphone is on and you will be heard (so you have to be careful what you say).


2

Your suggestion is perfectly understandable, but there are a few special words for this in English. The first is hawk. Bing gives this definition, carry around and offer (goods) for sale, typically advertising them by shouting. This word isn't much used in the US these days, but it's easily understood. It's well known in Singapore, for example, although ...


2

Regarding the usage of to: to preposition 2 b —used as a function word to indicate the result of an action or a process // broken all to pieces // go to seed // to their surprise, the train left on time (M-W) to preposition 2.2 Governing a phrase expressing someone's reaction to something. ‘to her astonishment, he smiled’ ‘Much to his surprise, this small ...


1

Let us look at some options if the people went on holiday for a week, the whole place would be reclaimed by the jungle by the time they returned This refers to a possible future event. They have not, as far as the speaker knows, been on holiday but if they did then the jungle would come back during the space of the week they were away if the people had ...


1

To talk about a large number of something (in an exaggerated way), we can use the phrase : tens of (thousands/millions/billions) of (something). Therefore, "Tens of thousands of people" is the correct phrase. "Tens of thousands people" is not correct.


1

"rub off the skin" seems fine to me. "Skin" is a reasonable word to use for that: Don't you eat the skins? No, I rub it off with my fingers Whoops, it shot out my fingers; they're a bit slippery. There are lots of ways to express this: you could use the verb "skin the peanuts (by rubbing)". If you are writing a thesis on ...


1

Borrowed from internet sites after googling: Parts of the peanut Parts of the peanut include: Shell - outer covering, in contact with dirt. Cotyledons (two) - main edible part. Seed coat - brown paper-like covering of the edible part. Radicle - embryonic root at the bottom of the cotyledon, which can be snapped off. Plumule - embryonic shoot emerging from ...


1

The phrase "get across" there means communicate. She is asking how she will be able to communicate to a nurse that she wants them to smother her, if she is so injured that she can't talk.


1

The usual expression is "... with raised voices". This would usually imply an argument of some kind, since that is the usual reason for shouting. Without additional context (such as "... to be heard in the noisy party") I'd assume that Kate and Mike were arguing noisily.


1

This is once again a correct but far too long-winded approach to English. Another factor that you seem to miss is that the other person can talk English back to you. So, what does a parent say to a child: Take the rubber band off your wrist! And then one of several things might happen: The child might do it. And this is fine. Or the child might ask "...


1

If a two part action, then 'coughed it up and spat it out'. If a one part action, "Coughed it out"... altho that is not a very common usage, probably because it is not a very common action. Normally we cough the thing up to our mouth, and then spit it out.


1

First off, whole fish, full of bones, is not unusual in Western culture. It just tends to be expensive and more trouble than it's worth. However, every supermarket sells whole fish. "Rock the fish" doesn't work at all. That is what you do to a baby to send it to sleep. I'd just say "check the fish" (it is implied that the actual ...


1

Those are called dreads or dreadlocks, styled dreadlocks: dreadlocks They can come in many colors and types. And they are often grouped together to form a new dread style. Dreadlock styles can get very competitive.... When a person doesn't have enough of their own hair, extensions are used. That's the case with many people. for example: football players [...


1

First, the word is "roll", not "role", to indicate movement of the eyes. Your suggestion of "look askance" is about right for the expressions in your pictures. American Heritage Dictionary "askance" With disapproval, suspicion, or distrust: The area is so dirty that merchants report the tourists are looking askance. ...


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