17 votes

Idiomatic word for someone who is an expert in multiple fields/subject?

Jack of all trades may not be what you want as the full saying is "Jack of all trades, but master of none". A rather backhanded compliment. all-rounder would be used by a native speaker, but ...
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15 votes

Idiomatic word for someone who is an expert in multiple fields/subject?

You could use the term Renaissance man/woman to describe someone with many distinct areas of competence. They may not be a world-class expert in all their different fields, but they do a lot of ...
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13 votes
Accepted

Is the term "beltway pansy" used in modern English?

There's an error subtitles: it should be "Beltway pansies" not "beltway pansies." The important difference is that this "Beltway" refers to a specific beltway, The ...
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  • 6,787
9 votes

Similar idiomatic phrase to "go to example"?

Substituting "prime example" would do. I might rewrite the sentence this way: Mr Smith is my prime example when ...
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  • 6,347
6 votes

Table equivalent of the word booth?

Where I live (USA), a booth corresponds to this definition: AHD booth 2. A seating area in a restaurant with a table and seats whose high backs serve as partitions. M-W booth 2 c. : an enclosed ...
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6 votes

Idiomatic word for someone who is an expert in multiple fields/subject?

The word "polymath" means someone with knowledge of many subjects. I don't recall ever hearing it used to mean skill at multiple sports. Rather, people will say that someone is a polymath if ...
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  • 57.1k
4 votes

Does "I walked all the way to school" refer to a continuous movement without stops on the way to school?

All the way here means that you covered the whole journey on foot. It says nothing about whether or not you made any stops on the way.
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  • 30.1k
4 votes

Does "I got the bag off the table" mean I took it off the table with some level of difficulty?

It could mean that, but it could equally well mean I went to fetch the bag. The verb get has many shades of meaning in different contexts. To get on a bus doesn't have any connotations of requiring a ...
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  • 30.1k
4 votes

Idiomatic word for someone who is an expert in multiple fields/subject?

The other answers so far give good suggestions for what to call someone who’s an expert in multiple fields of study or professions. But, most of those terms do not apply to athletes, which is what ...
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  • 4,291
4 votes

Idiomatic word for someone who is an expert in multiple fields/subject?

All-rounder is perfectly acceptable in this context. Refer to the dictionary entry/examples below. Collins: all-rounder [in American English] NOUN a person of great versatility or wide-ranging skills ...
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3 votes

Similar idiomatic phrase to "go to example"?

Examplar would work here: one that serves as a model or example: such as a: an ideal model b: a typical or standard specimen The corresponding adjective is exemplary, although this can also mean, “...
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  • 4,291
3 votes
Accepted

What does 'be overhead by' mean?

It's a typo. It should be overheard.
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  • 1,390
3 votes

“Which pencil of mine”

There is nothing wrong grammatically with “pencils of mine” instead of “my pencils.” It is stilted and awkward in such a sentence as your example. One use of the construction that does not appear ...
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  • 26.3k
3 votes
Accepted

Does 'Worms checkers' sound natural in the following context?

No, it isn't quite correct to say "worms checkers". Usually when making a plural compound noun, the plural "s" only appears on the last noun. So, in your example, that would be &...
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  • 1,706
3 votes
Accepted

"The trailer of the film was misdirection ran wild." Is this sentence natural?

No, it must be run wild. In the example Let your imagination run wild. the word run is infinitive. In the example The trailer of the film was misdirection run wild. the word run is the past participle ...
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2 votes

Alternative phrase to “out of the corner of eye”

"In my peripheral vision" or "at the edge of my vision" would express the same idea.
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2 votes
Accepted

Does 'as hell' sound like the speaker is raged?

Mirriam-Webster states "informal + somewhat impolite. — used to make a statement more forceful " Similarly "Chill out bro" is very casual language. It tells you to relax. You use ...
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  • 147k
2 votes
Accepted

Expressing hard work with idioms

The first idiom is correctly "burning the candle at both ends". (It is never used with the plural "candles".) The original metaphor was lighting a candle at both the top and the ...
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  • 31.6k
2 votes
Accepted

Word + yet + word

Whenever you use "word1 + yet + word2," the second word is usually a contradiction to the first word in some way. What you are saying is that even though it's word1, it still has some ...
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  • 496
2 votes

Is it correct to say "He is lying passing out on the floor"?

The thing that seems wrong to me about this is the verb 'passing'. To 'pass out' means to slip into unconsciousness. It can mean to faint. That happens in a moment. If he's already on the floor, it's ...
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  • 72.3k
2 votes

Is it correct to say "He is lying passing out on the floor"?

I would say, "He is lying passed out on the floor,"or just, "He's passed out on the floor."
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2 votes

Similar idiomatic phrase to "go to example"?

You could use "poster child": Cambridge: a person or thing that is seen as a typical example of something. The term is in wide use, and I admit this specific example.might be a little ...
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2 votes

Similar idiomatic phrase to "go to example"?

'Go-to' is commonly used to refer to a specific person, e.g. 'Smith is your go-to guy'. I haven't heard 'go-to' applied to a concept, e.g. 'a go-to foreign policy'. In the sentence 'go-to' refers to ...
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  • 127
2 votes
Accepted

Similar idiomatic phrase to "go to example"?

Mr Smith is your role model. You could either use "role model" as a noun, or you can use model as a verb "I model my parenting on Mr Smith's".
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  • 147k
2 votes
Accepted

Why there 'can't help improve' is used, not 'can't help improving'?

Cannot help doing and cannot help but do mean cannot stop oneself from doing something. He's sometimes annoying, but I can't help liking him. However, this is not the sense required in your sentence....
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  • 30.1k
2 votes

Idiomatic word for someone who is an expert in multiple fields/subject?

There are many words/phrases one can use, some of which are: professed, versed, veteran, virtuoso dexterous can also be used, but is more for hands e.g. piano/keyboard player You can read more here
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  • 3,646
2 votes

Idiomatic word for someone who is an expert in multiple fields/subject?

In sports we'd use "utility player" (from Wikipedia: one who can play several positions competently). "Utility" here comes from how they can be utilized in several ways, providing ...
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1 vote

Similar idiomatic phrase to "go to example"?

The word 'paragon' means a model of excellence or perfection source: Merriam-Webster online You could rephrase: I use Mr Smith as my go to example, when it comes to how to parent your kids. to Mr....
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  • 111
1 vote

Similar idiomatic phrase to "go to example"?

I use Mr Smith as my customary example, when it comes to how to parent your kids. From Google: according to the customs or usual practices associated with a particular society, place, or set of ...
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1 vote

Similar idiomatic phrase to "go to example"?

A slightly higher-register word rather than a phrase, but paradigm would fit here: EXAMPLE, PATTERN especially : an outstandingly clear or typical example or archetype. Source: Merriam-Webster online ...
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