8

Both "in the saddle" and "on the saddle" are used. The difference lies in what you want to say. "On the saddle" is merely a description of the position, while "in the saddle" means "in control". I guess you could imagine an emperor sitting in his giant chair, compared with a commoner sitting on his/her little chair, for an analogy. The same goes for "in the ...


5

Consider these two examples... 1: I never choose a starter in my local restaurant. I always have the "soup of the day" 2: I never get to choose a starter in my local restaurant. I always have the "soup of the day" The context of #1 strongly implies that I could choose some other starter dish from the menu - I just don't want to exercise my right to ...


3

You may use "conversely": If n is even then n squared is also even. Conversely, if n-squared is even, then n is even.


2

If you are chasing someone (or something), one way of capturing them (e.g. your prey) is to corner them. That is, drive them into a place, where it is difficult for them to escape because you can control all the exit routes. In Merriam-Webster this is the meaning 1a, when corner is used as a verb (which is the case here). When cornered, the target will ...


2

You can write this either way, the single "is" is more fluid, a little smoother.


2

"Takes no account of" can mean "intentionally disregards" but can just as easily mean "fails to allow for". For purposes of the exercise we take no account of atmospheric friction. (The friction factor has been intentionally left out of the solution.) This solution takes no account of logistic delays, and so may be inaccurate. (A possibly ...


2

Not having had time = the not having occurred earlier than the feeling. Not having time = the not having and the feeling occurred simultaneously.


1

"tl;dr" did originally mean "too long, didn't read". But some use it preemptively as if to say "I know this that I wrote is too long, and most won't read it, here is a short version". Personally I think the best way to use "tl;dr" is not to use it at all. It is disrespectful and dismissive. But many do not agree with that view.


1

Forsake is quite literary, while give up is not. Also, forsake is a transitive verb, and give up can be both transitive and intransitive. If you give up something, you stop doing something that you do regularly (e.g. to give up smoking/drinking alcohol/a job). We don't say "to give up somebody" because this phrasal verb is for activities, not people. To ...


1

Why would you want to use 'due to' when 'for' works perfectly well? @ivanleoncz correctly identifies such a usage with 'service providers' and gives an example from a bank. It is 'management-speak': language used, especially in corporate communications to make the writer sound more important (than they really are). There is seldom, if ever, any good ...


1

I believe that it's a formal situation. So due to seems more appropriate for such situation. Service providers use this beginning of tense for notices of technical problems with their services. Like this: Due to some technical issues, we are going to reschedule today's Google Hangout for the near future. We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience ...


1

This is a more informal/dialect-driven/less correct (opinions will vary on which it is) way of saying James Hetfield looks pretty torn up in those pics. Looking torn up is another way of saying that something looks run-down, worn, or broken-down. A rather literal example: If most of the area surrounding the Westerville Municipal Building looks torn ...


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