Skip to main content
8 votes
Accepted

"Have the guts" vs "Be Brave". Does "have the guts" always imply determination?

"Guts" is a slang word for "courage". Courage requires determination in a sense, like having the determination to do something dangerous despite the risk. But I suppose one could ...
Jay's user avatar
  • 68k
7 votes
Accepted

Does the proverb "having your cake and eating it too" imply hypocrisy?

You can't have your cake and eat it (too) just means ... one cannot have two incompatible things ... one should not try to have more than is reasonable ... you can't have it both ways ... you can't ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
4 votes

Does the proverb "having your cake and eating it too" imply hypocrisy?

Two ways to use the idiom. This idiom can be used in a positive or negative connotation: Ref. Cambridge dictionary have your cake and eat it too. idiom. to do or get two good things at the same time, ...
James Mathai's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

Do you really distinguish the difference between "the shirt's rumpled" and "the shirt's wrinkled" and "the shirt's creased"?

You forgot crumpled! My take on it: I would call a garment wrinkled if it hadn't been ironed after being washed - full of small creases. I would call it creased if it had been placed between other ...
Kate Bunting's user avatar
  • 57.1k
4 votes
Accepted

Does "I rushed to do homework" mean I quickly went to my homework and did it at any rate (maybe be fast or slow) or I did the homework quickly?

I don't think it's something very likely to be said. It could be ambiguous, but I would probably interpret it as your first, because for your second I would expect something like I rushed through my ...
Colin Fine's user avatar
  • 76.2k
3 votes
Accepted

Is it correct to say "glide my fingernail on the adhesive tape to feel its rim"?

tape and tape end. Often with various types of tape, we can't find the end. So: We run a fingernail (thumb or forefinger) around the roll of tape until we find edge or end of the tape. Then, we use ...
Lambie's user avatar
  • 46.9k
3 votes
Accepted

Can we use "like there's no tomorrow" with positive senses?

A person who is engaged in some activity "like there was no tomorrow" has wholly given themselves over to the activity and has no concern for consequences; they are doing it fervidly, with ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 130k
3 votes
Accepted

Am I using "for your peace of mind" correctly: "You should back up your file for your peace of mind"? Is the phrase equal to "to feel secure"?

Peace of mind as an idiom means to not have to worry about something specific that might be making you uneasy. The uneasiness usually won't stop until you take some specific action, like backing up ...
swmcdonnell's user avatar
  • 7,924
3 votes
Accepted

". . .this lot will strip the table bare…" What is this type of phrase called in English?

I understand the meaning of 'strip the table bare', but I'm not sure if it used literally or figuratively. Does it mean 'the others will have scoffed all the food before you have located your cutlery'?...
Andy Bonner's user avatar
  • 15.4k
3 votes

can we say "the fan turned off by itself"?

We find lots of entries when we Google turned off by itself. This usage is hence quite common. This is true too when it comes to books. Google Books has lots of hits for turned off by itself. For ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
3 votes

"load of something" vs "loads of something" -? Difference

For use in this sense, infml much or many as defined in Cambridge Dictionary, the OP’s quoted examples work too with their respective alternative phrases: There's [a load of] wildlife here. There [...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Until now/recently... but now

Both are grammatically valid. The first is a bit redundant, but most native speakers wouldn't notice the inefficiency of adding "now" if you hadn't drawn attention to the words you did via ...
DiogenesOfMiami's user avatar
2 votes

Is the phrase "until the 5th July" correct?

It's totally correct in both British and American English, based on Cambridge you can use phrases like: Today is the 7th September. Also more examples can be found on Grammarly and Wall Street ...
Amirreza's user avatar
  • 238
2 votes
Accepted

The more there of us....?

The phrase the more there are of us has many pages of hits in usages in Google Books similar to the OP's suggestion. The OP’s suggested use is natural.
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
2 votes

Do we use "the + singular noun" to express that type of goods?

The When we use the definite article it does not mean that the thing spoken about is unique, ie that only one exists in the entire world. It only has to be unique within the context - your audience ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 106k
2 votes

Am I using "for your peace of mind" correctly: "You should back up your file for your peace of mind"? Is the phrase equal to "to feel secure"?

"Peace of mind" means "freedom from worry". Backing up files for your peace of mind makes perfect sense: you back up files so that you don't have to worry about losing your data ...
Jay's user avatar
  • 68k
2 votes

Do you really distinguish the difference between "the shirt's rumpled" and "the shirt's wrinkled" and "the shirt's creased"?

First, no, creases aren’t necessarily intentional. To call something creased often conveys that the thing bears a single crease. And creases are sharper, more pronounced than are wrinkles. Also, the ...
Paul Tanenbaum's user avatar
2 votes

Is it correct to say "he gave me a bookshelf" or "he gave me bookshelves"?

Bookshelves is ambiguous, but so would be bookshelf. The ambiguity can be avoided by referring to the thing your father gave you as a bookcase.
Paul Tanenbaum's user avatar
2 votes

Can we say "I assumed a challenge."?

I'm not sure I can explain why, but you typically take on a challenge or accept a challenge. It's much more tangible than responsibility or power. When you assume responsibility, you become ...
swmcdonnell's user avatar
  • 7,924
2 votes

Does the proverb "having your cake and eating it too" imply hypocrisy?

Not inherently - that is to say, it isn't what the idiom means. But a context could arise where it is said about a hypocritical person. A hypocrite is one who claims to be something they are not, or ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 106k
2 votes

Is it correct to say "glide my fingernail on the adhesive tape to feel its rim"?

"Glide" is possible but not the best word. "To glide" in this context means to move smoothly, gracefully, and effortlessly, without encountering any resistance. Merriam-Webster's ...
Stuart F's user avatar
  • 2,504
2 votes

Is this called a math problem or a math question or a math exercise?

For precision in these answers you may be better off in the Mathematics forum. But at a basic language level my answers are: Problem, question and exercise are all natural words in this context. You ...
Peter Kirkpatrick's user avatar
1 vote

What does "hairy business" mean?

hairy business is slang that can refer to a dangerous, risky, or daunting job. Collins defines hairy as "exciting, worrying, and somewhat frightening" and "business" has among its ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 130k
1 vote
Accepted

Is it correct to say "the baby can walk 4 steps today" or "the baby can take 4 steps today"?

When reporting the ambulatory progress of a toddler it is idiomatic to say The baby took her first steps today. The baby took four steps today. The baby walked across the room today. "walked ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 130k
1 vote
Accepted

Is it correct to say "don't eat walking around" or "don't walk around eating"?

Clarity This is clearer: Don't walk around while you are eating. This is even clearer: Sit down and stay in one place while you are eating. It's usually clearer to ask for what you want than to ...
Ben Kovitz's user avatar
  • 27.6k
1 vote

Is it correct to say "don't eat walking around" or "don't walk around eating"?

Without while connecting your two clauses, your sentences sound like the following, where the two actions are integral to each other, not simply being done at the same time. The potential buyer ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 130k
1 vote
Accepted

Do we use "the + singular noun" to express that type of goods?

Unless the context says otherwise, in general use like in the Mary example, that is used as described in Cambridge Dictionary: We use that most commonly to point to a thing or person. In a shop, ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
1 vote

Until now/recently... but now

See my comment on your last question. "The present" can be a span of reasonable time. A single restaurant dinner is small enough to count as "now." There's no need, in this example,...
Andy Bonner's user avatar
  • 15.4k
1 vote

Is the phrase "piqued my attention" correct?

A useful tool for finding out whether a phrase is commonly used is Google Books Ngram Viewer, which basically searches all of Google Books, which is a bit more reliable place to look for meaningful ...
Andy Bonner's user avatar
  • 15.4k
1 vote

"Have the guts" vs "Be Brave". Does "have the guts" always imply determination?

In my experience "to have the guts" refers to having the strength of character to do what is right even if doing so would be difficult. With daredevil acts like bungee jumping it's not used ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 130k

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible