Skip to main content
6 votes
Accepted

Is there any difference between “essential to something” and “essential for something”?

In most contexts there's no difference between essential to and essential for. The possible nuance of difference is that to can identify something that is essential = intrinsic, inherent, central, ...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
5 votes

Do you say "You got the floor muddy" the same way we say "get something wet / dirty"?

To make something muddy is to cause mud to form, as rain on bare earth does. To get something muddy is to cause (already existing) mud to stick to the thing or penetrate into it, as by treading in mud ...
Paul Tanenbaum's user avatar
4 votes

Is there any difference between “essential to something” and “essential for something”?

The Cambridge Dictionary has this: essential for Water is essential for living things. essential to Getting enough sleep is essential to mental health. for=for the purpose of to = used to apply the ...
Lambie's user avatar
  • 46.4k
2 votes

Is it correct to say "arrange the cup side by side in a row"?

"In a row" means a single line of cups, it says nothing about which way the handles face. You can describe the photo as "cups arranged in a row". Since the cups are basically ...
James K's user avatar
  • 226k
2 votes

Can we use "like there's no tomorrow" with positive senses?

A person who is engaged in some activity "like there was no tomorrow" has wholly given themselves over to the activity and has no concern for consequences; they are doing it fervidly, with ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 128k
1 vote

Do we use "like crazy" for positive or neutral activities and "like hell" for negative ones?

No, either one can be used for either positive or negative situations. "When I saw the tiger, I ran like crazy." "When I saw the tiger, I ran like hell." "The thief fought ...
Jay's user avatar
  • 67.1k
1 vote

Do you say "You got the floor muddy" the same way we say "get something wet / dirty"?

Yes. You got the floor muddy is absolutely normal and correct. Native speakers use it all the time. The relevant definition is 5c from Mirriam Webster: to cause to be in a certain position or ...
DJClayworth's user avatar
  • 4,563
1 vote

Is this phrase construction correct grammatically?

In texting, users don't usually pay much attention to grammar. That sounds awful yes it would understandable bother you. is ungrammatical. There are two sentences here. A workable version could also ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible