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We use the definite article when something is specific. It can be a single thing in isolation or a group/collection of things that is easily identified. There are many regional accents in both American and British English. If you were referring to all of them, there would be no need for an article, definite or otherwise, because "I like American accents&...


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The XYS Institute Extends its heartfelt appreciation and gratitude to Ms. XXXX for all the care and responsibility she has shown in furthering our mission and work on behalf of [to come]. We would not use the word respectful here.


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(At least to me as a native American English speaker...) "Under my chin" is more natural. "In my neck" sounds like it was somehow inside the neck itself (that is, under the skin), and doesn't immediately conjure the image of how you were holding it in the same way that "under my chin" does. "Against my neck" would ...


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As what James has commented, both versions are used. Ngram shows that suffer most was more common of the two for about 180 years before this millennium.


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You are correct. The sentence is read: Indeed, a remnant of the Dunedain still dwelt there i.e. the last survivors of the Dunedain people. Tolkien likely broke the phrase up for poetic or dramatic effect, or to emphasize the connection to the previous sentence (by keeping the pronoun "there" closer to its antecedent "the westlands of Eriador&...


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I often take the day to read and answer questions on stackexchange. This version I often take a day to read and answer questions on stackexchange. is a little ambiguous. I mean it to say that's how I sometimes spend a day. It might mean that it takes me a whole day to address some questions. So your constructions are grammatically correct. Be careful to ...


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To express this, I would use the name of the city or street as an attribute of the word "address". Suppose I had a house in New York, and another in Los Angeles. I entered my New York address. On the other hand if I had two addresses in New York, one on Beech Ave. and one on Union St. I entered my Beech Avenue address.


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I entered my address in example-avenue, example-city. The appropriate preposition is as, as I filled in/ entered my address as .... With this, there should be no interpretation that you were at that place.


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I sat in front of my sister on the dolphin, succinctly expresses the action depicted in your illustration. Without the picture to aid in understanding, you may want to add ...that we were riding, onto the end of the sentence. A listener probably would not assume you were riding a dolphin unless you made it clear. To sit in the front of something requires ...


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That's very strong sarcasm (and strong criticism). A “four-alarm fire”, or in general a multiple-alarm fire, is a raging inferno. The name comes from the alarm bells that would ring in a fire station — more bells means more fire trucks were called to the scene. So showing up to such a disaster with an eyedropper full of water (a few milliliters at most) ...


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I'm not disputing @James-K's answer, but I'd add to it in the following way: I think the main reason that 'small hints' is not much used is because it is a tautology. Hints are by their nature expected to be 'small' and 'little'. A 'big' hint needs to be described, as it departs from the expected insubstantial nature of a hint. So, the two examples below ...


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A distinction is a difference or something that is noteworthy. NOAA was distinct because it didn't have an approved Head for the last four-and-a-half years. A dubious distinction is being recognized for something that is not good, not great. Ergo, it is a sarcastic way to say: recognized for the wrong reasons.


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Just as there is a difference between "small birds" and "few birds", there is a difference in meaning between "small hints" and "few hints". Small hints are hard to notice. They are subtle: for example a graph could have a very small bump on it that should not be there, unless "antistars" exist. The hint is ...


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'Some time' means 'a long time considering the circumstances'. It might be used about a half-hour wait in a restaurant (if a time has been agreed), or, as you suggest, longer in an airport, especially if you feel you have been waiting too long. I can correctly say 'I have been using a wireless keyboard for some time' if I have been using it for two years, or ...


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Both would be understood, especially in context. However in my local supermarket it is called a conveyor. There is an recording that repeats "Please prepare to push the trolley off the end of the conveyor" https://youtu.be/CzzdTno2KA8?t=35 You can go up on the conveyor. You can take (or ride) the conveyor (up to the first floor). You can't push ...


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To 'set right' is correct and would generally be said. To 'set aright' is a much less common dialect that most would find odd, however I believe in this context the meaning is identical.


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If by "gerunds", you mean "being" and "talking", in this case those are not gerunds, they are present participles. In your second example, the gerund phrase is introduced by the adverb "while", creating an adverbial phrase. In the first example, "not being told about the accident" is an adjectival phrase, so ...


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"Take a bite off the loaf" is perfectly fine. It's a perfectly grammatical sentence, and it would mean that you are taking a loaf of bread and biting right into it, without cutting or tearing it up into smaller pieces first. The reason why it's not normally said is because English speakers don't usually eat bread that way - but if you bought a loaf ...


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The phrase "swing your arms" is more idiomatic than "swing your hands", and it can purposeful or inadvertent motion. I think it would be a bit more natural to say "Be careful swinging your arms! You might hit the mug by accident." The phrase "swing at" does not indicate that contact with the mug was made, which is the ...


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The phrase of you is part of numerous similar expressions, such as: silly/foolish of you, brave/courageous of you, smart of you It's simply idiomatic - the way we speak - another way of saying that someone has behaved in a manner that is silly, brave, smart or whatever. To say naive for you implies that the belief, action or whatever is naive, rather than ...


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'Continued customer' doesn't make any sense. 'Continued custom' certainly does, because if someone regularly does business with you, their custom is continuous. It would not be unusual for a business to say "thank you for your continued custom" to a regular client. 'Existing customer' is a term you would use to differentiate from someone who may be ...


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"Setting the table" means laying out the plates and utensils. It might also include setting out the table cloth, setting out any center piece to be used, etc., depending on the formality of the meal being prepared for. It does not include bringing food to the table. The act of bringing the food to the table is called "serving the meal". ...


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To "note" something is to recognize and then acknowledge or comment on it. To do something "briefly" is to do it for a short period of time. (Or, in reference to saying or writing something, to do so concisely or using only a few words.) If something is "briefly noted", that means that one is only saying a little bit about it ...


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"Briefly Noted" is usually a category of "shorter than usual" articles in a magazine or other long-form publication. If the typical article is 1200 words, a "briefly noted" article might be 600 words or less. For example, in the Pennsylvania Gazette Briefly Noted section, there are only two or three sentences about each topic. A ...


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The two expressions are frequently interchangeable - and nobody would notice which of them you chose to use in your example. But some contexts are much better suited to one or the other. For example, in my opinion works better when you are talking about issues, controversies, politics, religion and the like. In these instances, you are offering your view on ...


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Your suggestions 1 through 4 are all better than the original. Your suggestion 5 would be alright as "The following is today's homework:". The original doesn't work. The problem is that it is pointing to the homework in two different ways, that is, with "here" and with "following". It should be either Here is the homework for ...


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For the first question the language I typically encounter is "advance": "You won't advance to 2nd grade if you don't learn this math." For the last, in typical US usage at least that is called "held back": "John was held back a year in 4th grade."


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Each of these sentences is technically correct: In the sentence "He's had girlfriends that are too young", "young" is an adjective that modifies "girlfriends", and "too" is an adverb that modifies "young". However, with the way that those sentences are constructed, "too" and "young", in ...


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I do not believe your sentences are correct. The problem is that, if you use “too” to describe a noun, it has to be relative to some standard. If you said, “This man is too young,” my automatic response would be “For what?” If you just want to say the man is young, you would say, “The man is young” without “too.” To use “too,” it has to be relative to some ...


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The table is angled towards the wall. This sentence is fine, but "towards" implies that one corner is too close to the wall and that it should be corrected by pushing that corner away from the wall. To remove that implication, either: The table's angled to the wall. or The table's at an angle to the wall. Do use the contraction "table's&...


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This medication works on me = it has the intended medical effect on my body. This medication works for me = it cures my medical problem. This medication works against me = it has a bad effect.


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Is Alibaba talking to a genie? In fact, is Alibaba talking to anyone at all?? If he is alone in a cave he probably just doesn't talk. Or if he does begin to talk to himself, he would say "اريد ان اخرج" If he doesn't have a Genie, he would be more likely to say "I hope to get out" or "I want to get out". Using "wish" ...


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That is a play on the common proverb Early to bed and early to rise makes and man healthy, wealthy and wise (https://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/early-to-bed-and-early-to-rise.html) so you can't really ask if "late" is used properly. The article is making an argument that although the proverb might be true for most people there are some who do ...


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The prince rode [at the head [of his regiment]]. He was in front of his regiment, his army followed him.


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to go on stage, to go on the stage are idioms for acting in the theatre, but not for movie acting really. That said, stage lingo can get complicated. He went on the stage instead of sitting in a seat like most directors. [physical] Actors can be said to come on stage when performing. They are also said to go on. "When did you go on [the stage or stage] ...


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Yes, because "leaving someone sad" is a separate meaning of "leave" than the one in "leaving someone", or "leaving someone behind". In "leave behind", "leave" has to do with going away from. In your examples of "leave sad", "leave" does not mean going away from, it means "...


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idiom: to take care of something, to handle it, to do what needs to be done. Basically, when finishing up a task, you would or might say it: That takes care of that. Here, he immobilizes them and says it. It is an idiomatic usage. He could have been cooking dinner, washing his clothes in a washing machine or taking out the trash or programming a rocket to ...


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"No way" is perfectly natural for that usage. In this case, the woman is saying that Marty saving the old woman's life sounds like it would be impossible, and therefore doesn't believe the man.


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Two things are just as likely to happen together as not [to happen together]. I think this answers your third question too. Your versions are not idiomatic (and you can't say 'as they are don't happen'). Just as likely means equally likely.


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When one says "you must be very hungry", one is saying, in effect, that one is forced to conclude (by evidence or information or how you look) that you are very hungry. It doesn't make sense to ask for confirmation from the other person that you must conclude that. You could say "You are very hungry, aren't you?"


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