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5

Both sound natural but are referring to different points in time in your unfortunate situation. "I feel nauseous" is present tense (i.e. right now you feel sick), the better of the two choices for saying you might vomit soon. "I got carsick" is past tense (i.e. at some point you became sick) and will most likely be what you say after you have already ...


1

Can you? Yes. Should you? Probably not -- unless there is a good reason to do so. Quoted phrases in an essay are primarily used to cite the exact text of an external source. If you are only citing your own opinion, it can be confusing to set the text apart with quotes, because the reader may naturally assume that you are referring to someone else's ...


1

The two phrases have similar meanings but are not synonymous. In one sitting - During one uninterrupted period of time. Source: The Free Dictionary (Idioms) All at once (in the literal sense) - Simultaneously (Happening, existing, or done at the same time.) Source: The Free Dictionary (Idioms) "All at once" can also be used figuratively to mean ...


1

There are several possibilities, but the closest synthesis of the two sentences in the question (to use the original wording as much as possible) is this: It was not a single occasion/time when she decided not to attend classes. It happened not for the first time that he decided not to attend classes. In short: It was not the first time that he ...


2

Both examples appear verbose and awkward though sentence structure and word choice always depend on what nuance you want to convey. The thought you seem to want to convey could be rendered for example by Not for the first time, he decided to skip his classes. or He decided, again, not to attend his classes.


-4

I think "all at once" may not be suitable for many of these sentences. Macmillan dictionary describes it as "very suddenly". "in one sitting" does not sound idiomatic for me at all. These phrases would likely be understood, but may sound unnatural. As more adequate phrase, at least for some of these examples, would be in one fell swoop.


0

In most contexts, until X would be understood as meaning up to, but not including, X (alternatively, until X starts, not until X finishes), so in #A above the speaker probably didn't think Series 3 was any good, and in #B the 5th car probably was problematic. But as you imply, there is the potential for ambiguity - for example, given the assertion He's at ...


0

To speak with one's feet can also mean to take action without words. One speaks with their feet if they have a bad experience at a restaurant and, instead of verbalising to the staff, they simply never go back to that restaurant. I tend to do this. It's a tangent of conflict avoidance, I'm almost sure.


0

When I searched "a newcomers" (no apostrophe) newcomers was always being used as part of compound noun, eg. "a newcomers guide" = "a guide for newcomers". Therefore the "a" is appropriate because it can refer to a singular noun, that is being described as for newcomers.


1

Your examples 2 and 4 are incorrect, because a possessive from is needed in this construction, as in numbers 3 and 5. I think 3 is better than 5, as you are one person and should be compared with an individual "man" not with "men". In any case one should not say "a rich men's fashion" because the article "a" implies a singular form, and this is plural. ...


4

"in the daytime" or "during the daytime" would be a much more natural and usual construction. I suspect this was devised by analogy with "at night" which is of course very normal. However, in context it is perfectly clear what is meant, even if it sounds a bit odd. I don't know why we use "at night" but not "at day" in English, but normally we don't.


1

I feel it's something people 50+ would be more likely to say. To me it means "experience", but at least one person in New Zealand who heard me use it thought I was referring to prostitution...


0

The manager might well say one of: I apologize for the inconvenience. I hope that you will visit us again when we will be able to serve you better. I am sorry that we were not able to provide you with our usual service. I hope that you will give us another chance on a different day. I am so sorry for the unexpected problem. Please accept my ...


0

I believe "saying that" is used in the same sense of "having said that", "that said" or "that being said". However, it is not a common phrase. I suggest you avoid it and use the more common and fossilized phrases such as those which are listed above.


1

On the third step. When you say Lolita you make three consonants, in the first two are "l" and you put your tongue on the roof of the mouth (l is a lateral approxiamant) the third and last consonant is "t", tap your tougue on your teeth (it is a dental plosive) This is meant to be the ramblings of an obsessed mind. He isn't speaking in complete or well-...


1

The above sentence is from Manhattan Prep 5lb 2nd Edition for GRE under sentence completion, question number 12. Akimbo is to keep hands on the hips with elbows turned outside. So the phrase akimbo to might mean to have attitude which we usually show when we keep our hands on hips and elbows outside. The correct fit for the sentence is abreast of


2

"I’ll have to buy a new one." is in the future tense, and implies that you'll buy a new computer... but not at this instant. There's no rush. Maybe tomorrow, or next week. "They can’t fix my computer. I have to buy a new one." is in the present tense. It's something you might say to the store clerk, while you are buying a new computer in the present moment. ...


3

I have never come across " Thanks a pile " in the UK. There are a whole bunch of very similar sayings: "thanks a million", "thanks a bunch", even: "thanks a lot" but when written down they all suffer the same issue, which is that they are just as frequently used in a sarcastic manner, so you need to be VERY clear in your context that you mean it in a ...


2

Any use of the pronoun "it" requires an appreciation of its definition: "used to refer to a thing previously mentioned or easily identified". If you are asking someone to tell you something then it is fair to say you both must know what you are referring to, so let's take it as a given that you are asking to be told something "previously mentioned". ...


-1

In my opinion, the second is better. I like the second better because it uses less words. The 'it to' is not necessary, but both sentences are correct.


1

A joint defense agreement means a defense agreement between at least two allied parties, for example countries. A defense agreement is a deal or a contract regarding military actions to protect the two allied parties, or collaborate on some military projects, like builiding a new fighter jet or a tank.


0

This technique can improve the performance, thanks to its A and B features. But I prefer: due to its A and B features. Thanks should really be used when there is a reason for it, involving people. Thanks to his brother's help, he was able to pass the exam. Others will tell you that thanks to and due to are interchangeable. Others includes dictionaries. ...


0

This is less of an English question and more about what terms are most appropriate or most common in a particular business or industry, in a particular country, and for a particular purpose. For example, bills of exchange and promissory notes are common ways of requiring payment, but bills of exchange are issued by the creditor (or a third party), and ...


1

"To think (something)" is a set phrase that is used as an exclamation of astonishment. It is meant to imply that the situation that occurred is almost unthinkable and definitely unexpected. It can also show up as "And to think (something)", which means the same thing. Usually English sentences don't start with 'and'. In "And to think" it is for dramatic ...


5

"I do" is definitely a grammatically correct answer. So are "Why do you ask?" and "None of your business" and "That answer is available (binary only) upon payment of the proper license fee" and "That's not important now" and "My hair is on fire!" All of these are grammatically correct. Whether they are appropriate answers is a different question, depending ...


1

I suspect the phrase you are referring to it singing along Examples I am singing along with the song He is singing along with the song They are singing along with the song. I sang along with the song (past tense) They sang along with the song


2

"Stretching", or "to stretch" is the normal expression and can be used in most situations. It is better to use the verb "stretch" than to force the gerund "do stretching" Stretching is important before running You should stretch before exercise. Stretch each muscle group in turn. Using the noun "stretch" suggests a particular form or way of ...


1

There are two idioms being employed: "Went out/go out" - to cease functioning, turn off, or fail in some way. "On me" - to me, toward me, at me, me. A more literal way of expressing this sentiment is, depending on what they're trying to convey, "The brakes of my car failed," or, more dire, "The brakes of the car I was driving failed while I was driving ...


1

What is and is not idiomatic depends on several factors, so I’m not completely disagreeing with @Andrew. But with that in mind: To my ears (native British English, specifically from Central Scotland) “the brakes went out on me” is not at all natural. I would always say simply that “the brakes failed on me”, or if the context was clear, just, “the brakes ...


0

As this NGram shows... ...the "idiomatic standard" here (particularly among politicians and pundits) is economical. Arguably, there's a slight difference in emphasis between being economical (not giving out the whole truth) and selective (choosing which things to divulge). But in practice nobody would be likely to care about such fine distinctions. I ...


3

Yes, "to be selective with the truth" means to tell some truths but not others about a topic. It at least implies that the result is to mislead, by omitting significant aspects of the whole truth.


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