New answers tagged

1 vote

What is the difference between "a few of" and "a few"

Both are used for plural countable nouns. “Few” means not many and is usually used in a formal context. “A few” means a small number of and is usually followed by a noun (what it is quantifying). ‘few’...
user avatar
  • 59
2 votes

How to express the idea that a wound has young skin when it is healing?

“My wound has granulating tissue.” Granulating tissue is the active formation of new skin. It is more of a medical term, rather than everyday language. Alternatively, you could say, “I have a newly ...
user avatar
  • 59
3 votes

Do Americans say “My car's tire has a slow puncture” in everyday English?

The answer provided by Davislor and CausingUnderflowsEverywhere is correct. We would typically and most precisely say, "My car tire has/had a slow leak" or more simply "My tire's ...
user avatar
0 votes

"Spoilt child", but "he's spoiled"

In Britain, a child can only be spoiled. Spoilt is something you do to homework, or cooking.
user avatar
  • 259
2 votes

How to express the idea that a wound has young skin when it is healing?

"New skin" would be better than "young skin". So something like "The scrape on my knee is healing up. The scab has come off and new skin has formed over the wound" It's ...
user avatar
  • 153k
3 votes
Accepted

How to express the idea that a wound has young skin when it is healing?

The dried blood is called a scab. As you see from the last paragraph, what is underneath when it falls off is usually called new skin rather than young.
user avatar
  • 32.4k
3 votes

Do Americans say “My car's tire has a slow puncture” in everyday English?

I live in North America and we will say: My tire's leaking. or My tire's got a leak. or My tire's leaking air. This is different from I got/had a flat or a flat tire because having a flat assumes the ...
user avatar
-3 votes

Do Americans say “My car's tire has a slow puncture” in everyday English?

As someone working in a field very closely related to medicine (but not a native English speaker), the term "slow puncture" makes sense, as it could be thought of as a "chronic puncture&...
user avatar
1 vote

Do Americans say “My car's tire has a slow puncture” in everyday English?

As an AmE, I find "My car's tire has a slow puncture" quite uncommon, I would most likely use the following in everyday conversation: My car's tire is flat I got/had a flat tire "My ...
user avatar
  • 6,341
1 vote

Are the three phrases the same in meaning?

I would say that they have the same meaning. In my experience, saying "to stay healthy" is most common.
user avatar
1 vote

Using "down to" to talk about code optimization

"The runtime of the code for the parametric study simulation (previously 9 hrs) is now down to 40 minutes." is entirely correct. "is now" emphasizes you're talking about the ...
user avatar
1 vote
Accepted

Using "down to" to talk about code optimization

It is perfectly idiomatic to use 'down to' to discuss a quantity, measurement, amount, etc, that has reduced from a previously higher level. My weight was 95 kilos in March this year; now it is down ...
user avatar
85 votes
Accepted

Do Americans say “My car's tire has a slow puncture” in everyday English?

I live in the U.S., and I would say "My tire has a slow leak." It is the leakage of air that is slow. The leakage might be caused by a puncture or by something else. If people in the UK say &...
user avatar
0 votes

Can I "see" the moon?

The momentariness of seeing and the connotations of enjoying do not go together very well. Option B within the setting of the particular phrase of the question is decidedly unnatural (although a ...
user avatar
-2 votes

Can I "see" the moon?

Both are definitely viable, but as a native English speaker, I would have to say that "watching" is more natural to say, as "watching" is pretty much a way of saying "seeing ...
user avatar
17 votes

Can I "see" the moon?

The test question is poorly written. There can be a distinction between “seeing” and “watching,” but either is equally reasonable as the missing word in the example sentence. Claiming either B or D is ...
user avatar
  • 3,851
2 votes

Can I "see" the moon?

Let me start by saying that the test question is poorly constructed. There is too much ambiguity, and the full sentence doesn't strike me as idiomatic no matter what word or phrase is inserted. That ...
user avatar
1 vote

Can I "see" the moon?

"I enjoy seeing the moon" is entirely correct, but conveys a very different message. While watching the moon indicates you are looking at it for an extended period of time, "I enjoy ...
user avatar
  • 161
35 votes
Accepted

Can I "see" the moon?

"Watching" suggests intently looking at the moon. You would do this if you expected it to change, or you were guarding it. "Seeing" may be unintentional. If you go for a walk and ...
user avatar
  • 153k
8 votes

Can I "see" the moon?

Watching would generally be considered a more on-going process, so fits better for something you take pleasure in doing. You might, for example, see the moon as you drive down some dark highway at ...
user avatar
2 votes

Is it correct to say "I braised the pork" or "I stewed the pork"?

The claim that braising necessarily involves "large pieces of meat or chicken" is simply incorrect. The technique is often used for large pieces of meat, like lamb shanks, but you can also ...
user avatar
  • 2,863
1 vote

Is it correct to say "give me 100 bamboo segments and I will turn them into a bamboo with 100 nodes"?

We don't have a specific word for this in everyday English. But "segment" would probably be understood. Culm, node and internode are technical biological terms. Node has a general meaning, ...
user avatar
  • 153k
1 vote

Is it idiomatic to say "are you up to nonsense again?" the same way we say "up to no good"?

It's okay, but it is rather condescending, perhaps in the form "up to your nonsense" (ie the nonsense things that you do). So use it only if you are talking to your children. It is of ...
user avatar
  • 153k
8 votes

Is it correct to say "She had never been sick since she started staying at home until she started going to school"?

First, "never" is absolute, and while you can qualify it by specifying certain circumstances, it only makes sense when speaking about a the circumstance in general. For example "She ...
user avatar
  • 922
0 votes

How to tell someone that them being near you is making you feel hot?

There are two people in this conversation. Please remember that you don't need to say everything at once. You don't need him to know that you are feeling hot Could you move up a bit? (There are ...
user avatar
  • 153k
1 vote

Is it correct to say "I had a race with my friends"?

I would never say I play poker against my friends It's an activity that we all enjoy together, even though it is sometimes quite competitive. I think that, if you are talking about an informal ...
user avatar
  • 56.5k
0 votes

Is it correct to say "I had a race with my friends"?

I had a race with my friends. Is grammatically valid, and a fluent speaker might well say it. I had a race against my friends/ is also valid and natural. The meanings of the two sentences are ...
user avatar
  • 34.2k
0 votes
Accepted

the meaning of "go as so far to"?

Yes, it means the protagonist had enough with Garp's abusing of Luffy, and went as far as to call him names. According to Dictionary.com - go so far as to: Proceed to the point of doing something I ...
user avatar
  • 6,341
2 votes

A wonderful month for me! (in future/present/past time)

As stangdon mentioned in the comments, the missing verb (and its tense) is meant to be inferred from context. If the phrase was referring to the past, or to the present, it would still be written as A ...
user avatar
  • 1,054
3 votes
Accepted

A wonderful month for me! (in future/present/past time)

The noun phrase "A wonderful month for me" doesn't contain any time reference. There is no tensed verb, nor is there a time phrase like "last year". It could refer to past, ...
user avatar
  • 153k
3 votes
Accepted

what does the proverb "A woman is only a woman, but a good cigar is a smoke" mean?

It isn't a proverb - it's a line from a Rudyard Kipling poem 'The Betrothed', so it has to be considered in context. At face value, it would suggest that you can get some enjoyment out of a cigar - ...
user avatar
  • 74.4k
2 votes

Can I use the verb "I sail a boat" when the boat does not have a sail but an engine?

Yes, you can sail a boat that has no sails. Lexico has sail VERB 1.1 Travel in a ship or boat using sails or engine power. [my bolding] the ferry caught fire sailing between Caen and Portsmouth 1.2 ...
user avatar
  • 14.2k
1 vote
Accepted

miss the time to go to bed

The most common way would be to say that they missed their bedtime (at least in American English).
user avatar
  • 2,805
1 vote

miss the time to go to bed

"... and stay up later than they intended", or just "...stay up later."
user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

Do we say "Do you remember your homework?" or "Did you remember your homework?"

It depends on which of the rather different meanings of remember you intend. Do you remember your homework? normally means something like "Can you bring to mind the content of your homework, or ...
user avatar
0 votes

"I pushed him by his back" vs "I held the cup by its handle"?

When you say 'by' in this manner, you're saying that 'in pushing him, I used his back'. That's kind of strange to the intuition; you target the back with your push, not that you used the back in ...
user avatar
  • 119
0 votes

Do we say "we have a situation here" for big serious problems in American English?

I can answer your last part about British English: You can simply replace "situation" with "problem" or "issue" Colloquially, we like saying "I've got a bit of a ...
user avatar
  • 292
0 votes

"No point (in) doing something"- can "doing something" be "to do something?

This is a case where Google Books Ngrams can help us a lot. For those who don't know, this service lets you search for the frequency of words and phrases in the vast Google Books database. Its biggest ...
user avatar
0 votes

Is it OK to write or say "as well as" + to infinitive?

I see more and more people use "as well as" thus as a conjunction and a synonym for "and", especially when they want to avoid confusion that many "and" may cause. I treat ...
user avatar
1 vote

Do we say "we have a situation here" for big serious problems in American English?

Yes. Think, for example, of a detective or cop discovering a crime scene and reporting it. They could say something like We have a situation here; call the forensics team. Although, you could remove ...
user avatar
  • 66
1 vote

"I pushed him by his back" vs "I held the cup by its handle"?

It’s rare that someone would clarify which part of the body they made contact with when they pushed someone or were pushed. Clarifying the direction of pushing is common and does imply which part of ...
user avatar
3 votes

"I pushed him by his back" vs "I held the cup by its handle"?

I pushed him in the back to move him forward. OR: I pushed his back to move him forward. from his back is wrong. Because: you can't grasp someone's back, i.e. hold onto it. I pushed/pulled him [up or ...
user avatar
  • 36k
2 votes

Is it correct to say "it's getting late to cook lunch"?

10 am sounds rather early to eat lunch, but if you were supposed to have started preparing the meal an hour ago you are already too late! It's getting late isn't usually used with reference to a fixed ...
user avatar
  • 32.4k
3 votes

"I pushed him by his back" vs "I held the cup by its handle"?

As stangdon said in the comments, yes, we say Pulled by [part of thing or body] to describe what precise part we're pulling. With Push, we have to use other words, as Push by sounds like we pushed [x] ...
user avatar
  • 292
0 votes
Accepted

What is a better wording for "agreed proposal"?

To me it sounds perfectly fine. I can only suggest you use synonyms of "proposal" e.g. Based on the agreed outline/plan, we want to send you ...
user avatar
  • 6,341
0 votes

Is it correct to say "his wife ghosted him although they lived in the same house"?

I'm going to disagree with many people on here. I think saying that his wife "ghosted" him is a humorous way of saying she stopped talking to him. I think it totally makes sense to a young ...
user avatar
3 votes

Is it correct to say "his wife ghosted him although they lived in the same house"?

I'll reiterate what others have said about 'ghosting' being a relatively new term unknown by older generations, but also that your proposed usage misses some of its nuance. Ghosting implies a person ...
user avatar
  • 535
3 votes

Is it correct to say "his wife ghosted him although they lived in the same house"?

I agree that you can't really 'ghost' somebody you live with, unless you are trying to give the impression that you've completely disappeared. Blanking someone makes sense at least in British English, ...
user avatar
10 votes

When do we say "my mom made me do chores" and "my mom got me to do chores"?

to make someone do something The person performing the task has no choice in the matter. They have to obey instructions or face the consequences. The police made me walk in a straight line (a ...
user avatar
  • 22.6k
1 vote

"some" in negative sentences

"I don't want to meet someone." would be an unusual phrasing. I'd assume if it wasn't a mistake (and you meant someone) that you mean There is someone that I don't want to meet". (...
user avatar
  • 153k

Top 50 recent answers are included