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How do express a candle in a burning state?

You could also describe the candle's state by saying that it is alight — which means that it's: burning, lit, on fire. and/or that it's: shining with light; luminous, radiant
gidds's user avatar
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4 votes

How do express a candle in a burning state?

Lighted candle is more idiomatic than lit candle. (See this Ngram). Burn doesn't always mean 'destroy by burning', if the reference is to a candle or oil lamp. We can speak of 'a candle burning in the ...
Kate Bunting's user avatar
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5 votes

How do express a candle in a burning state?

Yes, a lit candle or the candle is lit. "Lit" is one of these participles that has become, or is becoming, an adjective. But "burning" is also used: Keep lit candles away from ...
James K's user avatar
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1 vote
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Is "I am all against it" a counterpart of "I am all for it"?

Yes, we can say to be against something , but I'm all for it is a common idiom and this Ngram shows that I'm all against it is very much less common.
Kate Bunting's user avatar
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0 votes

Can 'of manuals' be fronted in '...the most conservative of manuals...'?

In English we sometimes put "of" between a superlative adjective and its noun to emphasize the adjective, or simply to make the language sound more formal. Yes, you could say, "only the ...
Jay's user avatar
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Can I say "let's eat. Hurry up!" to just one person while I am not eating or about to eat?

We sometimes use "us" when giving commands to "soften" them. By including yourself in those being told what to do, it sounds less like an order and more like a suggestion or idea. ...
Jay's user avatar
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1 vote
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Can 'of manuals' be fronted in '...the most conservative of manuals...'?

Yes, Of manuals, only the most conservative ... would be grammatical. It makes "manuals" the topic, and suggests that you are then going to talk about other kinds of writing, in contrast to ...
Colin Fine's user avatar
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-1 votes

Can I say "let's eat. Hurry up!" to just one person while I am not eating or about to eat?

The Oxford Dictionary says "let’s [no passive] used for making suggestions or as a polite way of telling people what you want them to do" Right, so whenever you make a suggestion or want to ...
Lambie's user avatar
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1 vote

What is the difference between a final draft and a final version?

They would pretty much mean the same thing. When working on an essay (for example) you create a first draft. You improve, edit or rewrite, that is your second draft. You improve the second draft, ...
James K's user avatar
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1 vote

Is it correct to say "the crow had the idea of putting stones into the pot to make the water rise up"?

had the idea to {verb} and had the idea of {verbing} are both well-attested, though not in the context of crows. You can search Google with the phrases "had the idea to" and "had the ...
TimR's user avatar
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What the usage of "have sufficient in common" is?

'Sufficient' is always contextual. It means enough, adequate, and so there has to be a stated purpose or condition. We'd expect that to be introduced by a preposition like "to" or "for&...
Astralbee's user avatar
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3 votes

What usage should 'more than but trivial length' be recognised as?

The grammar is fine, and nothing is omitted. 'But' can mean 'only' - a boy of but seven years, a walk of but ten yards. This usage is probably seen as old-fashioned by many people. The sentence is ...
Michael Harvey's user avatar
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What is the difference between 'is to be distinguished from' and 'is distinguished from'?

The passive infinitive form to be distinguished can be understood, in context, either as a statement about the future, synonymous with "will be", or as synonymous with modal must. You are ...
TimR's user avatar
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1 vote

What is the difference between 'is to be distinguished from' and 'is distinguished from'?

Overall, either "is to be distinguished" or "is distinguished" can be correct. But, to answer your question, the usage of 'to be' in this passage can signify one of two things ...
Xighteous's user avatar
1 vote

"Far above" vs "Well above"

In American English, well above would be used in situations where you want to express the idea that there is ample vertical distance between two things: These struts will lower the car's chassis but ...
TimR's user avatar
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2 votes
Accepted

Is there another more natural way to say "do it with excitement"?

Do it with enthusiasm (or passion). is fine. We could also say Do it with zest (or gusto). Collins Dictionary defines gusto and gives a similar example: vigorous enjoyment Hers was a minor part, ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

What is an undemanding person?

The two adjectives are different, as demonstrated in the case of the football coach. He is content but not undemanding. Being content describes a person viewing his own situation; being undemanding ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
1 vote

Is "the clock came alive" the opposite of "the clock went dead"?

We don't normally say that electrical items are "alive". I think you - and possibly some other comments - are getting mixed up with the word 'live'. The term "live" is used in ...
Astralbee's user avatar
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1 vote
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Is "the clock came alive" the opposite of "the clock went dead"?

I put the battery in and the clock came alive. [buzzer=a non-starter] I put the battery in and the clock came back on. [started working, most usual] I put the battery in and the clock started working. ...
Lambie's user avatar
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2 votes

Is "the clock came alive" the opposite of "the clock went dead"?

I've never heard of "alive" being used that way. The phrase used is usually "turns on". "X came to life" is usually artistic choice to emphasize the significance of ...
Raestloz's user avatar
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1 vote

Is it correct to say "I signed my daughter up for first grade"?

Short answer: Yes. It's completely valid to speak of signing someone else up. You might sign for someone else because they are too young to do it themselves, because they have mental disabilities that ...
Jay's user avatar
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3 votes

What are the dirty things that come out when you erase a mark called?

The word "debris" will do for just about any kind of unwanted multiple solid bits or chunks, of just about any size from microscopic to large boulders. Here is an advertisement where they ...
Spehro Pefhany's user avatar
8 votes
Accepted

What are the dirty things that come out when you erase a mark called?

Eraser crumbs is about as popular as eraser dust or eraser shavings. Eraser bits, eraser rubbings, and eraser residue are less common. https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=eraser+dust%...
Jasper's user avatar
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4 votes

What are the dirty things that come out when you erase a mark called?

We could consider eraser dust. A search with this phrase gives us a list of products like eraser dust vacuum, eraser dust cleaner and so on. This shows that the phrase is quite established.
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
0 votes

Is it too strong to say "the soup will wash off/ away the lipstick"?

Edit 2 I think remove would be more appropriate than wash. A search with lipstick and wash gives us titles related to how one can get rid of stains from clothes or similar. The phrasal verb wash off ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
0 votes

What does "throughout the period" mean?

I don't feel you have used this word correctly in the context of what you are presenting. The dictionary definition of 'throughout' is in every part of a place or object. So, saying there was an ...
Astralbee's user avatar
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2 votes
Accepted

Is it correct to say "I'll make up the time" or "I'll make up for the time"

to make up the time concerns time. I left work early yesterday. I'll have to make up that time next week. to make up for something concerns something that occurred that you caused. You missed my ...
Lambie's user avatar
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0 votes

Is it correct to say "I'll make up the time" or "I'll make up for the time"

The meanings are very similar and both sound fairly natural to me. The implication is clear either way, and I might not think about the difference unless dissecting written text. I'd say there's a ...
Nuclear Hoagie's user avatar
3 votes

half as much/many again as something

half as much again as is much more common in writing than 1.5 times as much as The same is true in the comparison of the many versions. Conversations are not tracked in Google Books, and hence I can't ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
3 votes

What does "throughout the period" mean?

Overall, there was an increase in female fitness membership throughout the period examined, while the opposite was true for male counterparts. Collins Dictionary says If you say that something ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
0 votes

Is it correct to say "I choked on water through my nose"?

The other commentary aside, all of which I agree with, I will make a point: situation matters. If I was a lifeguard and I pulled someone out of the water who told me, "I choked on water through ...
Stephan Samuel's user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

Is it correct to say "I choked on water through my nose"?

I would not call this "choking". I'd just say that "water went up my nose". I would also not call getting water in your throat as "choking". Perhaps "water ...
James K's user avatar
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3 votes
Accepted

is it correct to say "Pull your forearms down at a right angle with your upper arms"?

We wouldn't say "pull your forearms down at a right angle" as that implies that the pulling motion itself is at a right angle relative to something. More like this: When pulling your arms ...
TimR's user avatar
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1 vote

Meaning and usage of the phrase "of it all"

"it all" in these examples is used when referring to a large and nebulous thing, hard to define and place boundaries on. In your third example, What's the meaning of it all for us humans in ...
elliotcm's user avatar
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