New answers tagged

1

Yes, both are correct. In general, "X the Y to make it Z", where X is a verb, Y is a noun, and Z is another verb, is correct6 and natural. This is in the imperitive mood, and is instructional. The speaker is telling someone what to do (X) to achieve a result (Z).


1

"I am getting a cold" means that the cold is developing but is not yet fully developed. "I have a cold" suggests that it is fully developed. I"I am getting a degree" implies t6hat one is taking courses or studying for the degree, but has not earned it yet. "I have a degree" means it has already beed awarded. "I'm ...


1

"I am getting hungry" and "I am getting sick" are subjective phrases, there aren't really defined rules around them. In casual conversation, you might say "I'm getting hungry" even if you've been hungry for a while, because it might just flow better in your brain. If you want to be as accurate as possible, it's up to you and ...


1

As James K says, the "flower enclosure" is called a planter or a window box. The usual term for the edge would be the lip, which can be defined as "the edge of a hollow vessel or cavity." Here's an example of how you'd use the word, from the website of a company that sells planters: Begin planting in the center of the pot and work ...


4

There is a precise word for the "actively drinking" action, but it's fairly dated / poetical today. From the full Oxford English Dictionary (behind a paywall, I'm afraid)... draught (Section 5 - Senses relating to the imbibing of liquid, subdefinition 14a) The drawing of liquid into the mouth or down the throat; an act of drinking, a drink; the ...


4

There is no English word for the pauses. We could say: He drank it in five mouthfuls. He drank it in five sips. He drank it in five gulps. In reality we wouldn't count as far as five with regard to drinking, so we might see: He drank it in small sips. He drank it in two gulps.


7

You're looking for a name for the pause between mouthfuls when actually you need a word for the mouthfuls themselves. Small mouthfuls of liquid are called "sips", larger ones "gulps". If you said "He drank the glass of water" that could mean he drank it all in one go. If you said "he sipped the glass of water" that ...


3

Its a "window box" (if it is hung outside a window) or a planter. I've spoken Engish for over 40 years and in all that time I can't ever needed to refer particularly to the "edge" in contrast to what? the side? the contents? There's an interesting bug on the window box. Where, I can't see it. Just there, on the edge. I suppose that ...


0

I’m trying to bring it on with the fact that expecting a perfect job is unrealistic. bring it on - used for saying that you are confident and excited about facing a challenge or contest Source of meaning I am very confident that you aren't 'that' happy or excited about the fact that you didn't get the perfect job. I’m trying to get the news with the fact ...


0

They are similar so I think are mostly interchangeable. There may be a slight subtle difference. I think "said from the heart" is used usually after a meaningful speech/ proclamation/ personal declaration/ literary piece. "Meant from the bottom of my heart" could be used for even more emphasis and sounds a bit more personal and everyday. ...


1

This is what many older people will think of as a pillbox. Note the shape.


4

This is a another attempt at a "launch and leave" sentence. It's correct but it ignores the presence of another English speaker who can understand context or respond if they need more information. Just say Don't force it. As noted in a comment, the specific phrase for when threads don't align is "cross-threaded". So you could add It'...


1

Concerned with: Lexico's first definition of concern (verb) is Relate to; be about the book is concerned with the writer's childhood the book concerns the writer's childhood These both mean the book is about the writer's childhood. Concerned about: Lexico's definition of concerned (adjective) is Worried, troubled, or anxious I was dreadfully concerned ...


0

"Display stand with base" looks like the description in a catalogue, or an online site like Amazon. In "conversation" there is more context and you'd probably call this "a stand" unless having a "base" is particularly important. In fact you probably wouldn't refer to it at all, it is just implied by the context: I ...


1

"Off-the-shoulder" is a good way to describe the sweater in the picture. For the advice to a daughter, you don't need to put everything in one package. Lots of your questions ask for a way to say something but assume that the other person doesn't exist and won't respond. Instead you can just say "Sweetie, don't stretch your tee-shirt." ...


0

Where I'm from, follow fashion means copy cat. It applies to more than just fashion. Anything imitated makes a person a "follow fashion."


0

“in my daily life” means you have worked it into your other normal daily activities. In the context of exercise, this might mean things like always taking the stairs instead of the elevator, walking or cycling instead of taking a train/bus/car, etc. “on a daily basis” means you do it (nearly) every day. This sounds more appropriate for exercise that is a ...


14

There are two different adverbial expressions (with much the same meaning) being mashed together in OP's example... 1: Having considered the aforementioned reasons and examples, I think... 2: Having taken the aforementioned reasons and examples into account, I think... Use one or the other (whichever appeals to you), not both.


0

You can speak of contracting a disease that is caused by a virus, but you don't contract a virus per se. Your meaning could be expressed like this: By not following proper safety measures in your workplace ... you could [easily] expose yourself to a virus. or ... you could [easily] contract a viral disease.


1

To swing is referring to what the girl in the following picture does. What you are looking for is knock over. Be careful, you might knock over the mug!


0

Yes, it's fine. Replacing are going to with will is fine. Replacing get X caught in Y with catch X in Y is not always fine, but it works for fingers because you can't catch your fingers the way you catch a ball. (I.e., don't say, "You'll catch the baseball in the door.")


0

You'll catch your fingers in the door! You're going to get your fingers caught in the door! In #1, “caught” is active transitive, which isn’t really appropriate since it’s the door catching your fingers. However, the listener should know that and will reinterpret it as if you said #2. Despite it being technically incorrect, #1 is probably more common. ...


1

You can not omit the article. The first thing is while there is only one light, you are referring to one time when it was lit -- that is a single alarm/warning. The other ones may be nothing more than possible, but they will happen at different times. You can make clear which time you are referring to, by context or the like, but then the second is that ...


1

This is tricky, because "TV series" means different things in different countries. In the USA, it refers to every episode of a given show. But in other countries, it refers to the year of a show. Example: USA: "I am watching season two of the show Seinfeld." Others: "I am watching series two of the show Seinfeld." Your best ...


1

Logically it's not tautological not redundant, because kinds are nestable. You can have kinds of animals, kinds of kinds of animals, kinds of kinds of kinds of animals, ad infinitum.


0

These ten sub-lists together make the full overall list. These ten sub-lists together make for the full overall list. The usage of the definite article or preposition "for" followed by the definite article is the correct usage (in this case). As you said yourself, make up would be ambiguous in this case. The last example sentence of yours is ...


3

Correct, the reflexive "yourself" isn't required. "You may roll onto the floor." It certainly doesn't sound like the way most people speak to children, you would expect a dialogue: What are you up to :-) ;-)? rolling. okay, well, be careful then. why? You don't want to roll onto the floor. I'm not going to do that. alright then. with &...


0

Yes, they are equivalent. They express that you are stating the crux of some issue.


1

All fine. It doesn't matter much which one you choose. "Bumped" sounds like it is fairly harmless, use this for a sensitive child who may be upset by car crashes. "Crashed" sounds dramatic. Use this for a child who would be bored by mild play and wants something more exciting. Of course, if the child doesn't speak English, then it matters ...


2

“High hell” doesn’t really work, for me, because hell is generally considered to be “down” rather than “up” (high). I’ve never heard the word “hell” used in an expression such as this. “High heaven” is referring more to the distance than anything else, as a way of measuring the degree of something, i.e. it’s a lot.


3

In that specific context, the “it” in “it was all on me” refers to responsibility for the crash and her mother’s death, so “on” has the meaning in definition 17.


0

"Under your nose" in my experience. Especially given its usage is pretty much limited to telling people that there's some food or the like on that part of the face.


1

The first sentence The material should be issued in parts as small as possible sounds fine The material should be issued in as small parts as possible which is a variant of your second attempt would also be fine although it sounds a bit awkward to my ears. I am assuming you left out the first as which I inserted for you.


1

Tear the wrapper open by the side to take the straw out is fine - I think by sounds a little unusual here (most people would probably say at the side or on the side, or maybe from) but it works just fine! Tear the side of the wrapper off to take the straw out also works - your English is fine, but what you're describing might sound unusual to people. Tear ...


0

I am looking at the picture and see no zig-zag line. I do see a corrugated or ridged side. If that is where to open, I'd say Tear the ridged side to open.


0

It is a very generic phrase meaning that something is not quite right. It often refers to a gut feeling/intuitive kind of response, and so such a generic phrase is used because the person is unsure of precisely what is “off” and so can’t be more specific. So it can be used with people, objects, situations, etc. As for events, I’m unsure of your meaning here, ...


0

I think the best way to identify which of it needs to be used in a sentence is to omit the third person and see if it still sounds right with just you in reference. For Example: You and I were in a meeting yesterday vs I was in a meeting yesterday In the above case, it won't be right to use "me" because "Me was in a meeting" wouldn'...


1

"Stand by," by itself, can have multiple meanings. To stand by can mean "to do nothing." Indeed, it would be a common phrase to state that someone "stood by and did nothing" (a bit of a tautology), especially in contexts where the person could have taken some action that the speaker believes would have been proper. However, ...


2

I think 'turn on' is a little unnatural but you could use 'put on' instead. Of course, 'play' is also correct. Can you put on that song we heard earlier? (turn on) Could you play the video from timestamp 12:32? (turn on) I'm going to put on some videos about travel. (turn on)


0

"Give [x] a hand" is an idiomatic way of saying help someone... however it is also an idiomatic way of inviting applause for someone. Context, of course, ought to make it clear which you mean. "A helping hand" is just a more specific idiom. "Lend a hand" is another.


0

Carelessness literally means that you acted 'without care'. Carelessness certainly can lead to accidents, but that word alone doesn't imply you are without blame. In the UK, 'Careless Driving' (also known as 'driving without due care and attention') is a punishable offence. However, admitting that you acted carelessly can show that you have only just come to ...


1

What is the rub surface that we stick the strap on to do up the sandal called? This is commonly referred to as Velcro, which is a trademarked name. The generic term is "hook-and-loop fastener," but this phrase is widely seen as technical and may not be understood. do we say "stick up the sandals" (for sandals that are similar to the one ...


2

It might help to have some context: There are also numeric scores in the US. Each test or assignment has a maximum number of points you can earn. For example, a small quiz might be out of 5 points (so your score would range from 0-5). All of these points are averaged into a final grade and this number is translated into a letter grade, where an A might be ...


1

Firstly, I think the correct preposition to use when specifying the subject is 'in'. For example: I got a B in history. As for differences in grading systems, the general rule above should apply (determiner+grade name). For example, "I got one Four and two Threes in my exams". If you want to be very clear with grade names like 'Four', 'Excellent' ...


3

Is it correct to say "The bolt has an external male thread" and "The nut has an internal female thread" It is technically correct but redundant. A bolt is a threaded male fastener, and the thread will always be on the contact surface, which is the outside for a male fastener. Similar for a nut. "This nut doesn't fit tight on this ...


2

"Off" isn't used for extreme examples, but for things that are slightly deviant. "A bit off" seems like the usual expression. I've never heard "very off". None of your examples under "not acceptable" sound right to me with "off" as an adjective. (I'm a US speaker. Maybe a British speaker will have a different ...


0

Stand back and stand by: can't be separated in the statement of Donald Trump; he meant be prepared to do what I'll ask you to do.


0

No, it is not wrong. It is understood to mean "Wipe all the stuff off of his paws before he comes in." If the dog had his paws on the table, "Wipe his paws off the table" would be grammatically correct, but would likely be misunderstood to mean to wipe something off of his paws rather than to get the paws off the table. Much more likely ...


1

Tennis is a sport, not a kind of sport. It would make more sense to say "My favourite kind of sport is athletics" (because that includes a number of different activities), or "My favourite kind of sport is ball games".


1

The only difference is that the second speaker uses a demonstrative pronoun "this" in the first example but the second uses the simple personal pronoun "it". Both can be correct. It makes sense for the first speaker to use a demonstrative pronoun as they are (figuratively) pointing to an object that hasn't been referred to previously. ...


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