Episode #125 of the Stack Overflow podcast is here. We talk Tilde Club and mechanical keyboards. Listen now

New answers tagged

1

Either looks awkward to me, partly because each expresses observation rather than agency; to be mindful of (not) committing fallacies is merely to be aware of them (or their absence), and does not unambiguously imply any effort either way. I would prefer any of these: mindful not to commit fallacies mindful to avoid fallacies mindful of fallacies mindful ...


1

"Prior to study", "Prior to my study", "Prior to studying" all are reasonable ways of expressing this. As has been indicated in comments, using "several..." is rather weak (use the actual number or nothing). "Hi-Tech" looks odd ("technology companies" would be better) and since you can give details of dates in the actual CV, so "2015-2018" is not needed. ...


2

There were several staff changes. And the most important one and most significant change was that of Severus Snape who was appointed headmaster.


6

Either works, although the implied meaning is different. The first suggests you pay attention to any logical fallacies you might make (presumably, in order to avoid them). The second suggests that you pay attention not to make the logical fallacies in the first place. It's two ways to say the same thing. Because the word "commit" is slightly ambiguous ...


13

Being "mindful" means simply that you keep something in mind. The context and common sense would mean that if you are "mindful of committing logical fallacies" you are keeping them in mind so that you can avoid them. For example, a British employment lawyer says that "Businesses need to be mindful of falling foul of sex discrimination rules". He does not ...


3

mindful of doing means careful to do So what you want is When I write, I am always mindful of not committing logical fallacies I have to say that I find the construction verbose and a bit convoluted although admittedly idiomatic. When writing, I always strive to avoid logical fallacies. But that is rhetoric, not grammar.


0

"Initially" means "At the beginning", so "Initially few donors seemed to agree" means "At the beginning few donors seemed to agree" etc. "at least" has several meanings but in this case it is being use to emphasise a good aspect of a bad situation. So "At least initially [something bad]" emphasises that the bad thing should not last forever. Hence "At ...


2

It is grammatical, but, as R Sole said, wordy. Moreover, I doubt it says what you mean. I suspect that you want to say that you are using "visibility" in a scientific sense, that "visibility" is decreasing, and that pollution is one cause of the decrease. The proposition that "visibility" is decreasing due to pollution may be implied, but it is not ...


1

While both are technically grammatically correct, in general, using the past tense for that sort of question is more idiomatic and sounds more natural: Where did this come from? Using the present perfect in this case may sound a bit strange. However, the present perfect form is sometimes used to imply that the asker is more interested not in knowing ...


0

I do not think there is any difference between in or after a week. I will be back in a week I will be back after a week Both the sentences mean that he will come after the completion of a week.


0

In a week means exactly after a one-week period, except in those cases where "a week" is being used an approximate time period. After a week could mean more than a one-week period.


3

“Shut up here” is a participle phrase, since “shut” is also the past participle of the verb “shut“. Indeed it means confined. Someone has shut him up in Hogwarts or wherever he is, so he has been shut up there. https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/shut_up


1

The meaning "defend against" is being used here. The theories in question are disproved by Horn's research, so they cannot "stand up to" said research.


2

Whether it is correct may be less important than if it's being used. And it is. Just consider it as another attempt to add emphasis: Thank you Thank you very much Thank you so much Thank you so very much It could be a bit 'overdone', but that depends on culture, e.g. Americans tend to use more emphasis in these 'social phrases' than English ...


1

The verb "fall" can not clearly be used in active voice sense as the subject does nothing to perform the action of falling. Though "fall" is an action verb, the action of falling is acted upon the subject. Not only "fall" but there are also few other verbs considered as action verbs and used in passive sense but the action described by the verb is acted upon ...


1

The "not enough data" sentence is correct. The "no enough data" sentence is not correct. The critical word here is "enough", which works only with "not". However, if there is no data at all, then you would say "There is no data". In this case, you could not use "not". To summarise, the following sentences are correctly expressed. There is not enough ...


3

It is an idiom, and somewhat old-fashioned but still used. An example I found in a Google search: There is often way too much talk of building for the future but what about building for the now? If you Google the expression you'll find more examples. It is just a way of differentiating between "now" as a temporary state and "now" as a concept of current ...


0

The preposition out is used to make the meaning of a word stronger as in: We walked all day and were tired out (= very tired) by the time we got home. It's up to you to sort this out (= deal with it completely). (Cambridge Dictionary) So curb out smoking means eliminate smoking completely.


0

Apparently not. The GloWbE corpus has 7 instances of "curb out", 6 of which are this phrasal verb; but none of them is from Oz. (They are 1 US, 1 GB, 2 India, 1 Bangla Desh, 1 Kenya). It has no instances of "curbing out". The iWeb corpus (bigger, and newer) has 31 instances of "curb out", but on inspection, only two of them are of this phrasal verb; and 2 ...


3

I hear "People were really excited. It was the AI boom ... " The speaker is clearly fluent in English, but he is equally clearly not a native speaker, so his accent may be misleading you at times.


1

Unfortunately, miss has two different definitions that are almost opposites: Two of the definitions of miss from Lexico / Oxford Dictionaries: Fail to notice, hear, or understand. Notice the loss or absence of. In your first sentence, it is definition (3) which is the one that I would strongly think you were trying to use. It's hard for me to ...


1

The first sentence suggests that the billionaire is not getting any public attention, but wants (misses) it. The second sentence suggests that the billionaire is not getting any public attention, by keeping a low profile.


2

I think this question has been sufficiently answered on ELU. As you've noted, there have been several similar questions over yonder and here on ELL too. That said I understand where your bewilderment comes from. When you say someone/something has an impact on a thing, that thing is the object that the impact works on. In your example "the impact on the ...


2

the 's form should be used to form the possessive of a singular noun. However "jeans" is treated as plural (just as "pants" is) and so the possessive would be jeans'. But when one indicates "the pocket of a pair of jeans" one usually uses "jeans" adjectivally, so it modifies "pocket" giving "the jeans pocket" and not "the jeans' pocket". Indeed the latter ...


0

You need a form of the verb "to do" in there somewhere: To what extent does there exist disadvantaged families in this area? That's a bit unusual though. It would be more idiomatic if you said: To what extent do disadvantaged families exist in this area?


1

Logically you are correct, the conditions specified in the two versions of the sentence are exactly the same, and no one reading the sentence with attention could be confused about that. Version 1 could, on a skimming or careless read, seem to apply to two separate groups, and indeed the affected workers could be thought of as being two separate groups, who ...


0

It depends on the context, if they can be used interchangeably. A. In some cultures, it is rude to point at / point out a person. If, by the above sentence, you are referring to the action of raising or directing the index finger at someone/something, then it should be In some cultures, it is rude to point at a person. Examples: She pointed [with ...


1

In addition to books4languages.com's reference to the humorous aspect of the phrase I find it appropriate to mention the AC/DC's song "Let There Be Rock" where this phrase is used in a similar humorous way ... Let there be sound There was sound Let there be light There was light Let there be drums There was drums Let there be guitar There was ...


1

I would make a few corrections: Facebook is the biggest social media in the world, with millions of active users from all around the globe. On it you can find both native English speakers as well as a lot of people who are interested in learning English. There are thousands of pages and groups that teach English, and is the best social media website to ...


0

"let there be light" This phrase is spoken by God in the Bible during the creation story: 1In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth. And the earth was without form, and void; and darkness was upon the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters. And God said, Let there be light: and there was light. And God saw ...


Top 50 recent answers are included