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There is an idiom "Make it up as you go", which means "improvise continuously". The quoted phrase can be interpreted to mean he is constructing a new life without a plan for what it will be in the end.


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That doesn’t sound quite right. “Extensive” carries with it connotations of length, depth or detail. It does not simply mean “large”. Perhaps “a considerable amount of hard work”?


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Hardened and professional don't exactly have the same meanings. Hardened used to describe someone who has had a lot of bad experiences and as a result no longer gets upset or shocked no longer likely to change a bad way of life or feel sorry about it Professional used to describe someone who does a job that people usually do as a hobby ...


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Neither can be correct as an exclamation. There are some idiomatic exclamations which seem similar: What a goal! This has the form "What a (noun)". But your attempt isn't in this form. How about that! Your examples: How she looks. This isn't an exclamation. It is a little noun phrase meaning "The way that she appears". But it doesn't tell you ...


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Every sentence needs a verb. Neither of those have one, so they are both not really normal grammatical sentences. But we say them anyhow! Speakers of English might say "How great she looks!" in conversation, but this is really more like a shortened form of the question "How great does she look?", except it does not expect an answer. You really need ...


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There is so-called "sentence case" (where only proper nouns and the first letter of the sentence is capitalised. There Is Title Case in which All Words Except Particles Are Capitalised and then there is lowercase in which no words are capitalised. andThereIsCamelCaseWhichIsUsedBySomeProgrammingLanguges. dontUseItForWriting! We rarely use the expression "...


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We would usually say something like: All lower case. There isn't a direct opposite, most likely because "CAPSLOCK" is a thing, and its opposite would just be the absence of that thing, as opposed to another thing. Update You may also mean "proper case", which is where the first letter of each word is capitalised, e.g.,: This Is Proper Case For ...


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This is extremely informal and slang! It's also extremely recent new use. It likely derives from the phrase "I just can't", meaning "I am very frustrated and just can't continue to engage with [this specific thing]". Hence, "I just can't with you", meaning "You are very frustrating to me (ongoing) and I just can't continue to engage with you." (The ...


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Have you ever seen a dog try to carry a long stick sideways through a narrow gate? That is, the dog holds the stick horizontally (rather than, say, dragging it lengthwise). Here, “to the side” would not be meaningful. If a car moves “to the side”, we infer the nearest side of the road. But in your first example I think “to the side” is less good than “to ...


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Carrier fibre: a fibre that is blended with the main constituent fibre to improve processing behavior. Encyclopaedic Dictionary of Clothing and Textiles By K. K. Maitra Textile Glossary


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If there's a "take a penny leave a penny" jar, I've told them to put the change in the take a penny jar, but not all restaurants have that. Otherwise if there is change I think "keep the change" sounds archaic, maybe a little elitist or uncaring. I say "the rest is yours" or "I don't need change". It leaves the server to choose what to do with it at that ...


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