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The sentence But what they often lack is the evidence to base policies on. is idiomatic and doesn't need re-phrasing. Though, to be grammatically perfect and perhaps a little old-fashioned, it should be: But what they often lack is the evidence on which to base policies. The two phrases "the evidence on which policies base" and "the ...


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Yes, it's fine. Replacing are going to with will is fine. Replacing get X caught in Y with catch X in Y is not always fine, but it works for fingers because you can't catch your fingers the way you catch a ball. (I.e., don't say, "You'll catch the baseball in the door.")


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You'll catch your fingers in the door! You're going to get your fingers caught in the door! In #1, “caught” is active transitive, which isn’t really appropriate since it’s the door catching your fingers. However, the listener should know that and will reinterpret it as if you said #2. Despite it being technically incorrect, #1 is probably more common. ...


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Whether or not to include over the before last year is largely just a stylistic choice, but... If you do include over the, this strongly implies that multiple investments were made on several occasions, or continuously. If you don't include it, that interpretation is still possible, but it's also possible the entire investment took place on a single occasion....


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I can see why you are confused - this is a very un-common usage pattern. Basically "to people" a thing means to 'to populate' though in this case this is even more metaphorical, as the shadows mentioned (probably) don't come from anything physical at all - the narrator is describing a dream. You are correct that "waste" refers to a ...


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There isn't a verb missing, because people here is the verb. Lexico has people VERB 1.1 Fill or be present in (a place or domain) in her imagination the flat was suddenly peopled with ghosts As you say, the waste (wasteland) is the desert. So the sentence uses to people as a transitive verb: in her imagination, the desert was populated with wierd shadows ...


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These look correct to me. They use a double negative, but it is meaningful and correct.


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"Payload mode" is an shoot-'em-up game. This company is organizing an event, possibly to promote the game. "spin the wheel" generally refers to games of chance. "chest" is a large, strong box that may contain valuables. Perhaps there will be a lottery of some kind as a part of the event, and you can win one of the prizes (chests)...


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A 'wall-run' is where someone has enough momentum to be able to 'run up' a wall. In parkour, for example, a wall-run is a technique to climb obstacles taller than your jumping height. However, looking at your link it appears to be a game that simulates running forwards through a pipe. A 'wall-run' in this context would be where you can use momentum to run '...


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Yes, they are equivalent. They express that you are stating the crux of some issue.


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It can only mean the same as "But if" or "Although if". So it must refer to something in the previous sentence. For example: I never wear a hat and have never bought one. Though if everyone else started wearing them I suppose I would.


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Each jigsaw piece… We say jigsaw puzzles are made of pieces. …is shaped like a dinosaur We use the copular verb, like, to connect the subject (each jigsaw piece) to its predicate nominative (a dinosaur). Each jigsaw piece is shaped like a dinosaur The OP could mention that the pieces are handcrafted, which is a strong selling point. The OP and Lambie's ...


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The shapes in my puzzle are all elephant shapes. The pieces of my puzzles are elephant shaped. [not before a noun] Elephant-shaped pieces are hard to fit together. [dash if before a noun]. In English, something is or isn't a shape. In English, we don't usually say: "have the shape of". There is an idiom: x takes the shape of y. But that is ...


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You should back up your data in case there is a problem which will lead to a data loss. This is not correct. "In case" always refers to a hypothetical situation. The modal verb "will" indicates certainty. I would assume the above sentence was wrong, but taken at face value it could be assumed that the final clause refers back to the ...


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Just move your batter side to side in the batter’s box while the pitch is in flight to line up your swing perfectly. This can be rearranged in any of the following ways: While the pitch is in flight, just move your batter [from] side to side in the batter’s box to line up your swing perfectly. or To line up your swing perfectly, just move your batter [...


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It seems like you're cutting the sentence in an unnatural place and being confused by the fact that you've broken it off in the middle of a phrase. Just move your batter side to side in the batter’s box while the pitch is in flight to line up your swing perfectly. Removing some unnecessary clauses, we can simplify this to: Move your batter while the pitch ...


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Your preposition is used correctly, in my view, although a bit weird. I didn't understand what you were saying without the explanation so it might be useful to expand your statement a little to make it clearer. "Live by" is used more often with a large guiding principle, such as "faith" or "virtue", rather than "rumors"...


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Perhaps your confusion comes from the fact that "pitch" can be a sports ground (eg "a football pitch" is the grass they play on), but another meaning of "pitch" is as a verb "to throw". In baseball, "pitch" can be used as a noun (eg is when the ball is thrown that is "a pitch"). Just move your ...


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"Elven" means "the language of the elves". Since elves are fictional, their language is also fictional. The best known elven language are the languages invented by Tolkien for his books The Hobbit and Lord of the Rings: Quenya and Sindarin. Presumably this means that Æ means AI in the language of the elves. (Except in Sindarin, ...


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"Have the shape of" isn't really the best way of saying what you mean. If you have something that belongs to someone else then you have the actual thing, or it is identical. For example, if someone says "I have my father's nose", it means their nose is identical to their fathers. A wooden toy isn't exactly the same shape as a real ...


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The numbers identify or describe a specific day (a noun). so the numbers here are adjectives. Take a look at the source https://www.lexico.com/grammar/word-classes-or-parts-of-speech for more research. Just remember this Google search "what type of word is a description of a noun"


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Saying "personal reasons" practically means "please don't ask me for any further details." I don't hear "personal reason" very often.


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"Personal reasons" is intentionally vague, and would be understood that way. It would not usually prompt a question as to what the reasons are, though hearers might speculate. It might be used even if there is only one specific reason. Saying "a personal reason" is less vague, implying something very specific. It would almost seem to ...


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These are not usually interchangeable. But here the headline is talking about choosing between the two, so "or" is possible. Matt Nagy had to make a choice: keep Mitchell Trubisky on, or substitute Nick Foles. He made the call to bring on Foles.


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In Persian, we have this phrase “Whatever rots and becomes moldy, they salt it. Woe to the day when the salt rots” If corruption occurs in the lower classes of governments, they can be complained to higher authorities. Now, if corruption occurs in the upper classes of governments, who can be sued!!!


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