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That example sentence, as a native speaker, doesn't quite flow (beyond the it's typo). "It strikes me" is a metaphoric phrase where the an idea comes to your mind suddenly and without warning, like being unexpectedly struck by the thought as if it were a projectile. Seeing some clouds looming in the distance and assuming future rain doesn't really seem to ...


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You could title your worksheet "QWERTYUIOP" and it will have absolutely no effect on the five year olds who won't read it, won't understand it even if they do read it and probably won't even realise that the squiggles represent language which has meaning. Why would a full sentence confuse them any more? The only people who will even look at the title are ...


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1 indicates that you are responsible for some mistakes. 2 Isn't using the phrase "for my part". It indicates that for your "part" (perhaps a script for a play) there were some mistakes made. Perhaps they got you the wrong costume. 3 Doesn't make sense. 4 Is fine, but cumbersome. A native English speaker would probably say "If you cook a meal, then I'll ...


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The original meaning of "native" means "born in this country/region" When applied to software, it means "created for this hardware" So software that is native to the iPhone was originally written to run on an iPhone, and isn't adapted or ported from some other system. Native software will make often better use of hardware and the interface will seem more ...


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I've never heard that use, so I'd avoid it. An expression for a water pipe would be "the pipe has gone dry" or similar. You can also say "The pipe is blocked". Usually when a tap is not functioning it is "leaking" or "dripping" (which is the opposite problem). If there is water in the pipe, but nothing coming out of the tap then just say "The tap isn't ...


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A couple verbs are possible in this context: "sink", "dip", "retract", etc. However, in general, in English this is described as a movement of the head as opposed to the neck. A person may sink his head or dip his head (into his coat/collar) when the chill in the air hits. You could say "sink/dip one's neck", but they are less natural-sounding. It's also ...


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There is no rule that tells you what direct objects you can place after the verb travel. The two examples you give are both common. After that it's a question of how familiar the object (of travel) will sound. While you can safely say that you travelled a continent, it becomes less obvious that you can travel a country (depending on its size) or a region or ...


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From Merriam-Webster's definition of contrary: on the contrary : just the opposite // The test will not be easy; on the contrary, it will be extremely difficult. What the phrase does is contradict a claim within the previous clause: The test will not be easy.→ The test will be just the opposite of easy. The phrase doesn't contradict the entire ...


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I agree with you: it doesn't seem like the best fit here. That's because I also interpreted 'on the contrary' to contrast the entire previous sentence, but I think it's only intended to contrast '(not) trustworthy'. However, it is correct. Perhaps it's not the best structure by the author. I would propose: The man wasn't very trustworthy. In fact, he had ...


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The modal verb "can" usually indicates capability or ability. When you ask someone How can I use this tool? you're essentially asking How am I able to use this tool? This is a strange question to ask, because seemingly the only answer is Because you have hands. As you can probably guess, this isn't the answer you're looking for. Now, the ...


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Yes, the idea is correct. You need to add a verb before around the restaurant, as follows: She glanced over her shoulder and looked around the restaurant


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