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2

"Right" in this context would mean "as I planned/wanted it to", which they are deeming to be "correct" or, as they say, "right". So the person is saying that nothing went as they planned it or as they wanted it to. In some contexts it will mean that they planned a series of happenings, and nothing happened as planned. In other contexts it would mean that a ...


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It means "You would be". It implies, though doesn't state (as it was likely already stated), some condition that would need to be met, i.e. "You'd be really cool if...", e.g.: You'd be really cool if you wore that shirt.


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A standard turn of phrase (idiomatic usage) for the context here is... With apologies to Mirza Ghalib... (Your poetic efforts, which you admit are feeble compared to one of the acknowledged "poetic greats") This is a common self-deprecating way of admitting that you know your "poetry" isn't particularly good by comparison - but at least you're trying ...


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"Doodad" is one of several nouns denoting something that either has a name unknown to the speaker or else that may not even have a name. Thus, the meaning is In the game you can poke, swipe, and slide various strange objects ... "Doodad" is similar in function to "x" in algebra: it is a temporary name for what is as yet unknown.


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The second sentence is better. I think the reason "all the time" doesn't work with an instruction is that it would suggest, in a way, that you should keep doing the activity throughout the entire duration, which is still illogical as time is continuous, whereas doing something, even over and over again, represents distinct events. You could also say: ...


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A quick way to understand it would be to try and read it without the parenthetical statements. After all, parenthesis are supposed to contain only supplementary information or clarifications. You ought to be able to read and understand a paragraph without them. Here's the parenthetical statement enclosed in brackets: That reasoning might make sense if ...


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'If need be' is an example of a grammar fossil. The non count form of 'need' and the subjunctive verb 'be' are both old usage. At one time, that would have been the usual way to say 'if a state of need exists'. The phrase has remained even as grammar has changed. It is appropriate in formal English. There are plenty of similar short phrases. You probably ...


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This is not the verb to want in the sense of to wish for, but in its older sense of to be lacking in. The related noun want means the same as lack.


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Yes. Unlike some other languages (eg Spanish, Japanese), English uses the same copula be for contingent properties, innate properties, identity, and sometimes location: I am happy (contingent or transitory property) I am human (innate or permanent property) I am Colin (identity) I am in my house (location).


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"Put" means to place an object somewhere. "Keep" means to store an object somewhere on a permanent or long term basis. I put my bag on the desk so the inspector could check it. I keep my bag in the closet when I am at home. The first is temporary. The second is more or less permanent. You can use 'put" for long term placements, but you cannot use "...


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If you want to change the box's position, you would ask the owner "Is it all right if I put the box here?" or "May I put the box there?" "Where should I put the box?" is asking the owner where they want you to put it. If you keep the box somewhere, it will stay there for a long time.


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