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An honest mistake is a true or a genuine mistake. There's no such thing as a "dishonest" mistake—something is either an accident or it isn't. Rather, the term "honest mistake" is meant to contrast with an accidentally-on-purpose mistake. For example: Two coworkers don't get along. One of them accidentally takes a drink that the other had ...


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Neither. It means that when you wake up, you are sneezing.


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You can simply say I am going to Paris. if it has already been settled. I am going to go to Paris. is more uncertain than the former, and it means you are only planning on visiting the city. Either option is fine but beware of this difference, explained here in detail. I don't often find going to go or going to come, especially in conversation. It's a ...


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Each of these sentences is technically correct: In the sentence "He's had girlfriends that are too young", "young" is an adjective that modifies "girlfriends", and "too" is an adverb that modifies "young". However, with the way that those sentences are constructed, "too" and "young", in ...


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I do not believe your sentences are correct. The problem is that, if you use “too” to describe a noun, it has to be relative to some standard. If you said, “This man is too young,” my automatic response would be “For what?” If you just want to say the man is young, you would say, “The man is young” without “too.” To use “too,” it has to be relative to some ...


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The phrasing is clumsy and not something you should be encouraged to use in regular speech or writing. It doesn’t mean support in this case, it refers to the situation and what lead up to it. Iron Man is having trouble dealing with the fact that he and Captain America are on the outs, and the various causes for that. He can’t quite understand how it ...


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Stop snooping around. I've heard it used mainly in the context of infidelity, e. g. going through someone's messages. But it sounds appropriate here as well.


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"A fun place to be" would be more common, although you could certainly hear someone say the second version and no one would look at you weird. It depends on the context, though. "A fun place to be" would be correct generally because "A fun place to be at" is kind of repetitive and unnecessary, specifically because the verb "...


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The usual term for this activity is nagging, and the person doing it is a nag. But there is no implication that the person being nagged was definitely going to do the things anyway. I can't think of a single word that conveys that. I might say something like "they are nagging me needlessly" or "... for no reason."


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"The main" or "the mains" refers to the electrical supply to a house or building. So you have the meaning right. Here's a dictionary definition: American Heritage Dictionary "main" The principal pipe or conduit in a system for conveying water, gas, oil, or other utility


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The main refers to the main pipe or conduit that carries some service into a building. (A slightly different term mains electricity refers to the electricity that enters your house, through the mains, which are the main breakers.) https://www.ahdictionary.com/word/search.html?q=main The idea is that is when you close that conduit or shut down that breaker ...


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"That doesn't sound like him." ONE PARSE: That/doesn't sound/like him Subject: that A deictic pronoun. It refers to: Discourse Deixis Definition: Discourse deixis is deictic reference to a portion of a discourse relative to the speaker's current “location” in the discourse. The speaker is in effect "pointing with his/her utterance to something ...


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Example: "I ended up having to take care of it my own self." The -own- in "my own self" ("myownself"/my-own-self) is a sort of infix (as opposed to a prefix or a suffix) that intensifies the reflexivity of the pronoun "myself." Another example of infixation: unbe-fuckin-lievable. It's my strong impression that this is ...


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By definition, ice is frozen water, just as steam is vaporized water. Describing ice as frozen or steam as vaporized is unnecessary.


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This really isn't a grammar problem. Frozen ice, boiled steam, etc., all work within the syntax of the language. This is really a philosophical question. Consider that in some places, like Philadelphia, they serve "water ice" (although it sounds like "wudder ice").


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I know you said you know what the words mean individually, but they have multiple definitions so I'll cover them anyway. A 'theme' might be described as a recurrent idea that creates coherence throughout an entire experience. For example, in a story, a theme might tie chapters together. 'Thematically consistent' would therefore mean that several things being ...


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I don't believe "a pay-for" is common English usage. Perhaps it is jargon or shorthand used by politicians involved in the budgeting process. I think your interpretation is correct, considering the previous sentence: Senator Kaine is saying he believes the administration will have a plan to pay for most of the projects they are proposing (by way of ...


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He flew his kite on windy days but wished it was a drone. or He flew his kite on windy days but wished it were a drone. Q. WHICH IS GRAMMATICALLY CORRECT? A. He flew his kite on windy days but wished it were a drone. Correctly uses the subjunctive mood; "were" and not "was". The rule about the usage of was and were: use were with ...


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You can leave it out, much just stresses the intensity or degree of the emotion/feeling/state. Similarly, much is optional in the following idioms: (Much) to my horror, I looked up and saw the man standing in his yard. (Much) to my surprise, they offered me a £4,000 scholarship. I applied for the job, and, (much) to my amazement, I was hired.


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An informal verb you can use in this situation is the transitive verb to own. According to the Wikipedia article, Owned[...] is typically used to signify severe defeat or humiliation, usually in an amusing way or through the dominance of an opposing party. This word originated in the 1990s, where hackers used it to describe taking over someone’s computer. ...


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The line "My judgments seal the dead past with its dead," is a direct reference to Matthew 6:21-22 from the Bible, book of Matthew. https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Matthew%208%3A21%2D23&version=ESV 21 Another of the disciples said to him, “Lord, let me first go and bury my father.” 22 And Jesus said to him, “Follow me, and leave ...


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