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1 vote
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Are both the phrases same in meaning?

No, continuing means you keep doing something without stopping, regular is slightly different in a sense that it means you do something hut with time intervals in between it.
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off to a week's vacation

I think this may be one of those where BrEng & AmEng have different 'rules'. "off to a week's vacation" - never in BrEng. Even if we were to substitute 'holiday' for the US 'vacation'. ...
3 votes
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Is it the local way to say " I played a set of Go " or "I played a game of Go"?

The word "set" has many meanings. In sports such as tennis, players play a number of games that go to make up a set; several sets make up a match. But, to the best of my knowledge, Go is not ...
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off to a week's vacation

Yes that's natural. Another alternative is: I'm off for a week's vacation And it's usually used for real vacations, not so much for a week off from work. Otherwise it heavily depends on context, in ...
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1 vote
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How to correctly use verbs like read/look/browse to express the meaning " Every morning I take a quick look at the news on CNN”?

If it is a quick look you can go with Glance(Merriam-Webster Dictionary) to take a quick look at something. Skim (Merriam-Webster Dictionary) to read, study, or examine superficially and rapidly Scan (...
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What is the meaning of the phrase "as it were"?

as it were (Cambridge Dictionary) idiom sometimes said after a figurative (= not meaning exactly what it appears to mean) or unusual expression: If he still refuses we could always apply a little ...
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'between' is verbose

You question was how to re-phrase the following: I have a situation where an apple can be placed between two mangoes or between two bananas or between a mango and a banana. It sounds like you might ...
1 vote

"very well above", "so well above", "so much above"

I would not use any of your suggestions in the context in which you are proposing. "Well above" is something native speakers say when talking about gradations - for example, "his ...
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"very well above", "so well above", "so much above"

In informal speech, I would most often use way: The helicopter is way above us. The bridge is way up high. Our car is way on the other side of the parking lot. It might be more of an American ...
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1 vote
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Is there any difference in meaning and usage between the phrase "judging from" and "going by"?

There is no difference in meaning. The phrase "judging from" and the phrase "going by" are syntactically different, but semmantically equivilant. Also, both of the sentences you ...
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'The matter of fact is', - I came to believe this is grammatically accurate. Is it?

I would not use that phrase in a formal email. "Matter of fact" (along with "as a matter of fact") has become a set phrase to a certain extent, so it may sound unusual in different ...
1 vote

'The matter of fact is', - I came to believe this is grammatically accurate. Is it?

It sounds like a mistaken blend of "the fact is ..." and "as a matter of fact,...". I've never heard it before. I could imagine it in a conversation or an essay, where it referred ...
1 vote
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legacy code mean

Legacy code is a computer science term. It refers to programming code that was written much earlier than other code in the same project or other closely related software. Legacy code may be necessary ...
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2 votes
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Why do English people call baked potatoes 'jacket potatoes'?

One definition for jacket, according to Collins: the skin of a potato, etc. Here are some examples: Edward, the waiter, bruising the leathery jacket of the potato dexterously in his napkin, tumbles ...
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Why do English people call baked potatoes 'jacket potatoes'?

Correct. The jacket refers to the intact skin. "A jacket potato is a large potato that has been baked with its skin on. [British]" (collinsdictionary.com) "Jacket potatoes are eaten as ...
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As what does phrase "to make me laugh" function in this example? (as an adjective or an adverb)

The person in the video is correct. The example speaker isn't "looking laughingly", they are are looking for a specific kind of book. "a book to make me laugh". If it were an ...
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1 vote

what does it mean to take strongly to something

From Merriam-Webster: take to 4 : to start to have a liking for // I took to her immediately. // He tried skiing and took to it quickly. [=he quickly learned how to ski and liked doing it] To take ...
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what does it mean to take strongly to something

To 'take to' someone or something is to start to like that person or thing. 'Strongly' adds that the liking is powerful or great. take to someone/something phrasal verb with take verb to start to ...
2 votes

What does the bold sentence mean in the following excerpt?

It means that people mistake probability for promise, and that they judge the forecaster to be wrong when the less probable outcome happens. The writer claims that if the weather network says there's ...
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1 vote

"The Lakers have been winning in a row"

When using in a row, a quantifier (such as a number, or a statement) needs to be used. Using you examples: The Lakers have won four times in a row. We need to win many times in a row if we want to ...
3 votes
Accepted

Origin of the phrase "beat to the socks"

The material (which you should have copied, not linked to) says: Jack Kerouac used to claim that the term "Beat Generation" came from the expression "beat to the socks". The other ...
2 votes
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What's the meaning of " ask with low respect"?

The phrase could have two meanings, depending on the usage of the word low: If using the word low as a measure (as in "low standards"), asking with low respect would mean asking the question ...
1 vote

What's difference between "Above me" and "Over me"?

There is no absolute distinction between the two, but in the business context I (and @gotube!) would say that He is above me generally means 'He is at a higher level in the organisation than I am' and ...
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1 vote
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What's difference between "Above me" and "Over me"?

In the most general context of a workplace hierarchy, someone who is over you is immediately above you, ie they oversee your work. Some organisations call this your 'line manager', or your 'immediate ...
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2 votes
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Commas and Phrases Following "That"

If a condition clause ("if" clause) comes before the result clause (main clause) there's always a comma between them, so the second comma is non-negotiable. The first comma is more ...
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The question is about the use of correct participle(s) in a sentence

My way of saying it would be: For past arrivals: Only a small percentage of immigrants, having arrived in the US, ever returned to their native countries. For current arrivals: Only a small ...
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The question is about the use of correct participle(s) in a sentence

All of these forms are awkward. They might be understood correctly but would be jarring to sentence flow and understanding. The form "immigrants arriving in the US" suggests the group that ...
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Is there a phrase or expression that means "riding a horse with another person"?

Just for the record! According to the Maquarie Dictionary, dink is indeed used for exactly this purpose, in Australia. https://www.macquariedictionary.com.au/resources/aus/word/map/search/word/dink/...
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Is there a phrase or expression that means "riding a horse with another person"?

"Riding pillion" was used in the US/Canada but seems to have dropped out of general usage. You'll find it in Mason Arnold Green https://www.google.com/books/edition/Springfield_Memories/...
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1 vote
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In the way i understood vs In the way as i understood

The conjunction "as" doesn't seem to make sense here. The author probably wants the following clause to modify "the way". The most common way to do that would be with a relative ...
1 vote
Accepted

Does "lines of work" have to contain the meaning of earning money?

I agree with you: Lines of work is a perfectly valid phrase, but I don't think it applies in your sentence. "Saving lives" or "helping the most vulnerable" are aims or goals, but ...
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2 votes

Is there a phrase or expression that means "riding a horse with another person"?

The phrase I have always used is riding two-up. However, the dictionaries don't seem to have caught up with this usage in the equestrian space, but there are plenty of hits for riding motorcycle with ...
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