61

It's one way of showing plurals that is used with acronyms. It's widely-used, but whether it is correct is the subject of debate. It may be best to avoid its use in formal or professional documents. Generally, CPUs will always be considered valid, while CPU's may or may not be (this applies to other acronyms). You may find these resources interesting: ...


55

"Craft" is one of those words that has several very different meanings. "Craft" could mean "skilled work" or "hobby". In this case, the plural is "crafts" - such as in "arts and crafts". "Craft" can also mean a vehicle that people use to travel through water, air, or outer space. In this case, the plural is "craft" (no 's') - such as in "aircraft", "...


51

We form the plurals of regular nouns ending in the sound /s/ by adding the sound /ɪz/ to the word. So for the word bus, /bʌs/, we get the plural form /bʌsɪz/. In writing we represent this with the written suffix -ES. So we write the plural form of bus as buses. Words that end with the written letter X usually end with an /s/ sound. The word box, for ...


45

Punctuation is a matter of style. Here, 's is almost certainly used to pluralize the initialism CPU, but whether this is appropriate depends on which style manual you, your editor, or your organization follows. The New York Times stylebook, which is derived in large measure from Associated Press style, has this to say about plural abbreviations: Use ...


38

"Series" can be singular or plural depending on context. Both of your sentences are therefore correct but different. I like to watch TV series. uses series as a plural and means you like to watch a number of different TV shows. I like to watch a TV series. uses series as singular and means you like to watch one TV show.


38

You have certainly found a typographical error. That you found multiple examples is testament not to its correctness, but only to the frequency of the phrase "female representatives" and to the declining standards of proofreading in the Age of the 24-hour News Cycle. (p.s.: I just noticed that The Grauniad threw in a "these kind" for good measure!)


35

Some English words borrowed directly from other languages retain the plural form of the other language. For example, fermata is pluralized as fermate, and cirrhosis becomes cirrhoses. The most familiar examples are words taken directly from Latin, of which there are at least hundreds: persona / personae, matrix / matrices, fulcrum / fulcra, and so forth, ...


30

Because phrases that indicate the amount of sum, time, distance, weight, temperature, etc. are treated as singular: 10 million pounds is a lot of money. = This sum is a lot of of money. 50 liters of petrol fills my car. = This quantity fills my car. Five kilometers is a long way to walk. = This distance is a long way to walk. Fifty degrees is ...


30

I think there is a distinction to be drawn here which will allow you to avoid confusion; namely: the noun "craft" has several meanings, while "aircraft" has only one. The meaning you are focused on is "craft" as a moving vessel, such as watercraft, aircraft, or spacecraft. All three of these terms as well as "craft" itself are the same in their singular and ...


27

Most of the group names on that list aren't general knowledge or in everyday use. If you want an even longer list that includes the terms for the male and female members of the species along with the name for the young and groups, check this out. Many of these aren't general knowledge, either. Even for animals we talk about a lot, the average person ...


26

If you're referring to the idea in general, it's not countable. There's nothing to count. "Someone who practices magic", "friendship is magic", or "magic powers this device" would all fit this pattern. However, if you're referring to some specific kind, it's countable. So "the magics of necromancy and enchantment" is legitimate: it's referring to two ...


26

People is a collective noun. When we talk about a specific group of people, we consider it as singular and therefore, no need to add s. Peoples is used when we talk about two or more different ethnic groups. For example, "All the 14 distinct peoples (native groups) of the continent were part of the survey". Whereas People's is not the plural form. The ...


26

The reason why the first example does not use an article while the two others do is because the first does not refer to a specific amount. If instead of an unspecific number of minutes you were to say it crashed in ten minutes then you would instead write: The plane crashed a mere ten minutes after take-off. On the other hand, if we were to rephrase the ...


25

Use brothers in both speech and writing. Brethren is a very old plural which is no longer in use, except in very narrow contexts: in works of fiction which depict historical times, or try to create a similar 'atmosphere'; in religious (or quasi-religious) works which embrace the language of the King James Bible; and in works which allude to uses of this ...


23

Actually they are different. Believe is a verb which is simply used for accepting the truth. Example: He believes that all ​children are ​born with ​equal ​intelligence. In above example the word "believes" is used as a third-person singular simple present. Belief is a noun which is generally used for acceptance/confidence in truth, faith or trust. ...


22

Here's an edited version of a post I did for ELU on a similar question (which got closed): The existential construction takes there as a subject. There has no meaning, and often the verb takes its agreement from the complement of the verb BE. So if the Noun Phrase after BE is plural, the verb will usually be in a plural form. If the Noun Phrase is singular ...


21

The word "police" is rather special: It has no singular noun form. Something like that police over there is securing the scene would be incorrect. One would always construct sentences in the plural form like so: The police are out in force today. Anything done by the police will reflect on them. Other words that take no singular form would include ...


19

Both are correct, though there are some specific usages as pointed in another answer; Google Ngrams suggests that indices is slightly more used than indexes. For American English we have (in both charts, indices is blue and indexes is red): For British English we have:


19

“Who” can be made plural the usual way, but that is not what is needed here The “Whos” And “Wheres” Of iOS Device Usage ExplainedSource: TechCrunch headline This is a plural in the sense that it refers to multiple mentions of (or answers to) the question “who?”. “Who” does not have a plural form like the way that “is” changes to “are” Generally speaking,...


19

Who can be either an interrogative pronoun ("Who is that?") or a relative pronoun ("The man who sells fruit"). Neither interrogative pronouns (question words) nor relative pronouns (which/that/who and variations) are bound to grammatical number by themselves. The plurality is instead bound to the object in question. Examples: "Who is that man?" - singular ...


18

When you use the word zero as a number, the word it quantifies should always, I repeat, always be plural! Example #1: Ice melts at zero degrees Celsius. Example #2: — How many friends do you have in this town? — After that story went public, I have literally zero friends! You may ask why is that true? Well, consider this. You can have three cars, ...


17

When all is used with a plural noun, it means every, and the verb agrees: All the countries were represented at the games. When all is used with a singular noun, with or without of, it means entire and takes a singular verb: All the country was in mourning. To use your examples, you could say "All the books are expensive" and "All the book is in ...


17

Actually, I think you are looking for the difference between people and peoples. People means indeed a group of humans, as in: The people of Germany speak German. It can also be used as a plural of person: Many people like apple pie. The plural of people is peoples and is used when you talk about several groups of humans, usually several ethnic ...


16

The correct use changes depending on the sentence: Do you have any idea how to do this? Do you have any idea what to do? Do you have any ideas for me? Do you have any ideas for how to do this? It seems that, if the singular or plural noun (idea) is directly connected by a subordinating conjuction (how / what / where / which / that), you use the ...


16

Pop­corn is a mass noun, not a count noun. It’s like rain or snow, or straw or hay, or bar­ley or wheat. Or corn. If, for some strange rea­son, you were talk­ing not about corn en masse, but rather about in­di­vid­u­al ker­nels, then you would have a count noun, so you could say that ker­nels were ready in the plu­ral. But oth­er­wise, you would just say ...


16

Although the proper Latin plural would be fora, forum has been adopted into the English language--and in most cases follows the rules of English pluralization. Similar changes can be seen with the adoption of other words like octupus (the proper plural would be more like octopedes, but in English we usually say either octopi or octopuses). The current entry ...


16

Criteria is plural, criterion is singular. That's just the way it is, if you want to sound educated. Consider that it's an awfully erudite word to throw around in an illiterate manner.


16

In special cases, such as when forming a plural of a word that is not normally a noun, some writers add an apostrophe for clarity. Example: Here are some do's and don'ts. In that sentence, the verb do is used as a plural noun, and the apostrophe was added because the writer felt that dos was confusing. Not all writers agree; some see no problem ...


15

It should be the printer's is, and it is singular, as it refers to a shop, as you say, not to people plural. The 's is a possessive s, with an apostrophe. Whenever you really mean plural printers, spelled as such, use the plural, printers are. It's really that simple!


15

Information is a non-countable noun (you can't have 4 informations), so it is neither singular nor plural. The correct usage is "information" without the 's'. More info here: https://english.stackexchange.com/questions/117552/why-does-information-not-have-a-plural-form So actually, neither one of your sentences is correct. You can't have two informations; ...


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