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11 votes
Accepted

It's only the fool who becomes anything. - Why is "anything" used?

The reason that anything works here is because, although the sentence is technically positive polarity, it has a type of negative meaning. Words like anything, ever, at all, and yet usually occur in ...
Araucaria - Not here any more.'s user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

Why is it that 'too' cannot be used in agreement to negative sentences?

The first option with the comma doesn't produce an acceptable sentence. The comma in this instance is purely style, not grammar. Too has a positive polarity. It can't be used to confirm a negative. ...
Luke Sawczak's user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

Which is grammatically correct in English? Don't forget to write one, too. or Don't forget to write one, either?

too / either indicates that one person or things is (to be) treated the same as one that has already been mentioned. too is used in positive sentences: I have told Jane. - positive I have told ...
JavaLatte's user avatar
  • 59.9k
4 votes
Accepted

What's wrong with this sentence, and how can I write it correctly?

What is wrong is that the sense (positive, negative) does not match. The clause "so does Michael" means he does like football - so the joining word "and" is incorrect. The correction depends on what ...
Ross's user avatar
  • 156
3 votes
Accepted

(very) few and negative polarity items

Ordeal is countable, so you must write such an ordeal. C and D are otherwise correct. D sounds slightly more natural because very and ever are both used to add emphasis. E is not correct because a ...
Jeffrey Carney's user avatar
3 votes

"He gets away with anything."

He gets away with anything I think that most people would feel that this sentence is not right. It's dangerous to use NGrams like the one that you quoted unless you check at least some of the actual ...
JavaLatte's user avatar
  • 59.9k
2 votes

What about the usage of "any" and "no"?

You were technically correct (the best kind of correct!) - however, the usage of any and no is not limited to either abstract or countable nouns. All of the following sentences are correct: - Do ...
Maciej Stachowski's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

"I see nothing " vs "I don't see nothing"

In standard English (unlike much dialect and slang usage), "I don't see nothing" is incorrect - unless your intended meaning is "I see something". In standard English, a "double negative" results in ...
rjpond's user avatar
  • 23.1k
2 votes

Do native speakers use double negatives in order to mean positive situations REALLY

It is not uncommon to use not with the negative form of an adjective, as I have just demonstrated. This can be used as a way of phrasing a diplomatic answer: the intended meaning is that you don't ...
JavaLatte's user avatar
  • 59.9k
2 votes
Accepted

Using at all in a positive sentence that is not a conditional

The clue is in an earlier paragraph: Nobody delivers learning. Learning is something that happens inside the mind of an individual. It simply cannot be delivered. He is saying that the teacher ...
Kate Bunting's user avatar
  • 55.6k
2 votes
Accepted

Negative polarity item 'any' & Positive polarity item 'some'

[1] *Only two of us had some experience in sailing. [2] Only two of us had any experience in sailing. Yes, (1) is ungrammatical. "Any" and "some" are polar-sensitive items, with &...
BillJ's user avatar
  • 17.1k
1 vote
Accepted

Would dream of ( in a positive clause)

Your phrase in bold is a passive-aggressive way of saying, "You're not polite or considerate or grateful enough to ever say 'thank you'". And that statement implies that you should say "...
gotube's user avatar
  • 50.9k
1 vote

Would dream of ( in a positive clause)

I am a native speaker. This sentence is not idiomatic in context. You’re welcome and variants are standardized responses to a “thank you,” which by hypothesis was never uttered. Although technically ...
Jeff Morrow's user avatar
  • 32.1k
1 vote

What would be the connotative meaning of "deeply grounded in tradition"?

I'm not certain that "deeply grounded in tradition" carries any objective connotative meaning. It's a semantically neutral description, and more or less synonymous with "traditional", although to a ...
Andrew's user avatar
  • 88.4k
1 vote

Do you say 'Tokyo has much rain'?

We usually use much in questions and negatives. So the sentences # 2-4 are not appropriate. The sentence #1 is very common or idiomatic. Alternatively, you can say: Tokyo gets a lot of rain. or ...
Khan's user avatar
  • 27.2k
1 vote
Accepted

What kind of impact the word 'yet' has on the sentence?

In your example, yet is used a a kind of intensifier to say that the experience is the best you could have when compared to any of your experiences in the past. Yet means up until now in your ...
Peter's user avatar
  • 66.2k
1 vote

The usage of "ever"

It might useful to tell your students to think about the pair of words 'ever' and 'never' together, and in terms of their meaning/semantics: ever means 'at least once' never means 'no times' 'Never' ...
nachose's user avatar
  • 635

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