10

At an interview, you should not be too effusive with your greeting, or too verbose (unless invited by a leading question intended to draw you out). The interview panel makes the moves, so I suggest you be polite and uncontroversial. Good morning / afternoon is sufficient, with a brief look around the interviewers to make it clear you are greeting them ...


4

When politely greeting one person, we can say "good morning/afternoon/evening", and possibly add "sir" for a man, or "madam" for a woman, although these are now very old-fashioned in Western countries, except for e.g. royalty, judges in court, etc. "Sir" and "madam" do not have plurals. To greet a group, mixed in gender, we can say "Good morning/afternoon/...


2

You're probably better off asking this over on The Workplace. This kind of "business-speak" is not something every English speaker will know; plus it's constantly evolving. However, to answer the question: a common term when talking about what is and is not within the specifications of a project is "scope": I believe these additional sections would be ...


2

Tell me the meeting date. This is not at all polite. There is no pretense of it being polite; it's an instruction. Please tell me the meeting date. Tell me the meeting date, please. Slightly more polite, but still not generally polite. It's still obviously a directive, an instruction, and since your boss objected to it, they probably found it ...


1

"I'm afraid [that]" is an apologetic way of introducing a problem that does not have a convenient solution. For example: "Thank you for coming. I'm afraid my English is not very good, so I will give this talk in {Language}."


1

This question definitely has a lot of facets, many of which should be asked on other SE boards. Skipping everything interpersonal and contractual, you still have different options depending on the details. If you think this should be a separate project because it covers too many topics or talks about too many things, or is simply too large for its ...


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