56

I am going to write this answer from a sociolinguistic perspective, because there is a lot at stake that can't be explained with a yes/no answer. Nonetheless we shall still make an attempt at giving a simple answer to your title question. Yes "cop" is considered slang. No, it is not derogatory. For a term to be considered derogatory, it has to ...


24

There are many options to choose from. Here are a few that are polite. "You can stop off here, if you like; I can easily walk to my apartment from this corner." Another option is: "My home is inside this community, but to save you needing to drive through you are welcome to drop me off here." Your friend is not correct is saying that the "can" ...


13

A similar question came up recently but in a restaurant setting. If you say: You can get me the bill now. that's rude because you are telling the waiter what to do. It's the same as saying: Go and get me the bill now. Fetch me the bill now. The waiter knows beforehand that the bill is required at the end of the meal. The only thing you're saying ...


11

At an interview, you should not be too effusive with your greeting, or too verbose (unless invited by a leading question intended to draw you out). The interview panel makes the moves, so I suggest you be polite and uncontroversial. Good morning / afternoon is sufficient, with a brief look around the interviewers to make it clear you are greeting them ...


9

The standard sentence (at least in the UK) is: Anywhere here is fine, thanks. No need to overcomplicate it.


7

It's polite to say "you can" if you're letting someone know it's okay by you to do something that may be more convenient for them. You should only use it if you're fine with them choosing not to do that thing. It's rude to say "you can" when you're asking someone to do something for you. This means it's fine in your example. The driver can drop you at the ...


5

When politely greeting one person, we can say "good morning/afternoon/evening", and possibly add "sir" for a man, or "madam" for a woman, although these are now very old-fashioned in Western countries, except for e.g. royalty, judges in court, etc. "Sir" and "madam" do not have plurals. To greet a group, mixed in gender, we can say "Good morning/afternoon/...


5

Q1: Is "cops" a derogatory term or slang? Does it have a negative connotation? A1. Yes, cops is definitely a slang term. It was also widely considered a derogatory term in the recent past. Whether it is still considered a derogatory term may depend on factors like region or age. @BowlOfRed is correct that the term was widely considered ...


4

The word "boarding" is not reserved for formal use - it's just the correct term for "getting on" most kinds of public transportation, but particularly planes and boats. It is commonly used in all contexts, formal and informal. A plane ticket is exchanged for a 'boarding pass' and in my experience of air travel all passenger announcements use the term, so it ...


3

It all depends on tone of voice: "You can stop here." is fine if your tone of voice is nice. Also, it is the same thing as: "Can you stop here". It's as simple as that. But, it is always a good idea to say please. Your friends are wrong. "You can" does not mean your are the master. Your tone of voice is what makes a difference in cases such as these. ...


3

Tentative volition: Would you tell me the way to the station? Tentative possibility: Could you tell me the way to the station? If you think of a case to decline the request, to answer a "Would you...?" question, the literal answer to that question is "No, I would not." This sounds like you have no will to help him/her, and so it is a bit awkward. As such, ...


3

There is no need to apologise for this. This requires no more apology than the time you didn't use "the" in the right place. You are, as you said, a non-native speaker of English. We expect non-native speakers to have a non-native level of English, and if you make mistakes that is fine and expected. If I (even as a native speaker) apologised for every ...


3

You're exactly correct. The reason that I want a chocolate now. might be rude, is because it could be meant to imply that the speaker expects that the listener provide him/her with chocolate immediately; in other words they are demanding chocolate. Lets put aside notions of if or not this sort of demand is always "rude", of course there's a ...


3

As per the comments, I feel “silly” is a bit lighter. You could try something more emotionally specific/descriptive, such as “embarrassed” or “guilty”. You could also prefix anything you say with “a bit” or “a little” to tone it down and make it sound less harsh. She felt a bit stupid/silly.


2

Can you please tell me the exact sequence of steps that I need to follow, including what item to select from each pull-down menu and each submenu? To be polite when asking for information, any of these are good: Can you please tell me _____? Could you please tell me _____? Will you please tell me _____? Would you please tell me _____? "...


2

That is a "title of address". Forms often refer to it as a "prefix", just as they often call '"Jr", "2nd" etc a "suffix", because a title of address preceds the name in this usage. Other titles of address include: "Sir", "Lady", "Lord", "Bishop", "Governor", "Senator", "Earl", "General" and many others. A title of address is one that may precede a name ...


2

The phrase itself is polite enough, but it is often used in situations where the speaker is being impolite by making the comment (such as correcting a stranger on some trivial mistake). As a result some people interpret the phrase as impolite, even though it is not, itself, impolite. An unstated assumption of a let you know construction is that your friend ...


2

Tell me the meeting date. This is not at all polite. There is no pretense of it being polite; it's an instruction. Please tell me the meeting date. Tell me the meeting date, please. Slightly more polite, but still not generally polite. It's still obviously a directive, an instruction, and since your boss objected to it, they probably found it ...


2

There are many ways to tell that including what Justin has mentioned in the comments. I'd also add one more to it especially when you mean that there are little but significant differences - What are the subtle differences between A and B?


2

If you really want to ask the person coughing, you might say: Would/Do you mind if I wear a (face/surgical) mask? But it might be simpler just to look away - if necessary to walk away - and slip on a mask without making a show of it. It might depend on the circumstances. Certainly, in the light of the coronavirus, most of those concerned would simply ...


2

The other answers are all fine, but in the specific case of taxi ride, I'll offer a slightly different opinion about the social aspect of it: "Stop Here" or "Stop here, please" is fine, especially if both of you are speaking English as a second language. Clarity and brevity are important, especially since time is a factor. Your demeanor when you speak ...


2

I always view formality by asking myself how it would be written in a formal setting: Please board the plane by row number vs Please get on the plane by row number. Obviously boarding is a formal use. Similarly with have and have got. Filling in your passport application= Do you have any children vs Sitting in pub chatting with a stranger= Have you got any ...


1

A better way would be to say "Attached are the documents you requested." It's more about clarity than formality. In a business environment it is generally more polite to be accurate and clear. In the message you sent, Thomas would need the context of his previous request (or to open what you sent him) to understand what it is you sent.


1

No need to apologize. The combination Ms./Mr./Mrs. + first name is actually not uncommon in the U.S. I had an advisor in college who asked us to address her as "Dr. Mary". In formal settings of course this combination is likely inappropriate. Using Mr./Ms./Mrs. indicates formality and politeness, whereas addressing someone by their first name shows ...


1

It doesn't sound impolite. I see no problem with it. "I'll call you back" is sometimes (not always) used to say "I'm not that interested in you", so replying with "I'll be waiting" is a fair way to say "I hope that you will actually do that and not just forget about me". You might want to express some urgency. On the other hand you could just reply "Okay", ...


1

This isn't so much a question of English language, but of etiquette. As a native English speaker I find responding to these emails just as awkward, as they sort of put you into a corner, where, as you said, you want to be polite and kind, but don't want to sound unoriginal (which we may fear will be perceived as uncaring). There are a few options I can ...


1

Your example sentence I want a chocolate now. May or may not be rude, it depends on context and tone of voice. Usually if someone is asking for something from someone else then I would like a chocolate now please. Would be the polite way to ask, most people who feel it's rude are assuming something is being asked of someone. However, if I'm going ...


1

I would certainly not say hand to hand, as that implies unarmed combat. However, I also wouldn't say that buying something face to face is a natural expression either. Instead, this would be a far more natural dialogue: "Did you order it from him on the phone?" "No, I bought it from him in person." Alternatively, you could say that something is an in-...


1

No - "hand to hand" has a different meaning, and refers to a kind of fighting, ie hand-to-hand combat. "Changing hands" is a term used to describe the sale of something from one person to another, but is mostly used to describe the sale of businesses themselves rather than goods. The term "second-hand sales" also refers to the sale of pre-owned goods. Any ...


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