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42 votes

Why use an adjective after a noun?

Rather than Noun + Adjective, it can be thought of as Noun that is Adj, which uses relative clause but that is is omitted. We always have to go to, you know, someplace that is nice. Is there ...
ChocolateOverflow's user avatar
15 votes
Accepted

Why use an adjective after a noun?

There are two possible mechanisms that could explain the position of the adjective in the example sentences that you provided: postpositive adjectives and whiz-deletion. When you apply an adjective ...
JavaLatte's user avatar
  • 60.3k
4 votes

Is the post-modifier "to write" part of a noun phrase in "letters to write"?

I have [letters to write]. Yes, the bracketed constituent is a noun phrase with the noun "letters" as head. "To write" is an infinitival relative clause post-modifying "...
BillJ's user avatar
  • 17.3k
2 votes

postpositive participles

Past participle verbs postmodifying nouns are non-finite clauses, not adjectives, not predicatives. So in your first example "gained" is a past-participial clause postmodifying "experience". Past-...
2 votes
Accepted

modificational scope of "two years ago"

[1] I bought the book [which I had read two years ago] [and which had the author's autograph]. [2] I bought the book [which I had read two years ago], and it had the author's autograph. [1] and [2] ...
BillJ's user avatar
  • 17.3k
1 vote
Accepted

Paraphrasing a sentence with post modifier

The three sentences mean different things. The first explains why you feel scared - the reason for your fear. Your girlfriend is already obsessive about you. The second expresses your concern about ...
Ronald Sole's user avatar
  • 25.8k
1 vote

What kind of modifier are the two words “allurement and fulfillment” in the following extracted sentence?

These words are subject complements of the subject "it", which referees back to "nature" in the previous sentence (as it appears in the source). The referenced text is written in a somewhat pompous ...
laugh salutes Monica C's user avatar
1 vote

Understanding modifier

What must Google do to keep the competitors AT BAY? Preposition phrases don't "act as adverbs or adjectives", but as modifiers and complements. Adverb and adjective are word categories (parts of ...
BillJ's user avatar
  • 17.3k
1 vote

Is the that clause in this sentence a misplaced modifier?

I want proof from you that it isn't a scam. There is no misunderstanding. That sentence is fine. if I say "I want proof that it isn't a scam from you" the listener will think that he made the scam ...
Sam's user avatar
  • 9,640
1 vote

Adverb phrase or noun post modifier

No one knew much about sleep. The preposition phrase about sleep is not a Modifier of the noun phrase much in this sentence. It is the second Complement of the verb know. The verb know is taking a ...
Araucaria - Not here any more.'s user avatar
1 vote

this new method of verifying

It is not given what the old method was, nor even if there was an old method. There might have been an old method of verifying what people said twice, or the old method might have verified what people ...
James K's user avatar
  • 226k
1 vote

'Obsessiveness about' or 'obsessiveness with'

https://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/obsessive obsessive about (doing) something I try to stay fit, but I’m not obsessive about it. https://linggle.com/?q=obsessiveness+about%2Fwith
Robinson's user avatar
1 vote

'Obsessiveness about' or 'obsessiveness with'

I think "obsessiveness with" is more correct, even though I don't think in the dialect and academic writing, people will often use the word "obsessiveness"
Mint Tea's user avatar
1 vote

when he was under the influence of

Yes, it changes the meaning entirely. a. A discussion of his behavior when he was under the influence of medications was helpful to him. b. A discussion of his behavior, when he was under the ...
Patriot's user avatar
  • 1,008
1 vote

when he was under the influence of

The commas mark the phrase between them as extra information, however marking this marking doesn't clear up the basic ambiguity in the grammar. The pragmatic meaning would take account of our ...
James K's user avatar
  • 226k
1 vote

when I was growing up

A c) would be good to demonstrate intent however as far as American English goes b) is actually perfectly clear verbally, tho written down it doesn't sound correct
Benk's user avatar
  • 11
1 vote

when I was growing up

As mentioned in comments, this really requires a c) Both a) & b) are grammatical, but neither easily conveys the intent. You'd almost have to construct an explanation into your wording to make it ...
DoneWithThis.'s user avatar
1 vote

repetition of descriptive phrase

This is a style question. In English, it is not obligatory to omit the repetition of a description, but there should be some reason to repeat it when it isn't necessary. The reason could be esthetic, ...
Jack O'Flaherty's user avatar

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