23

It is a very old use, no longer used in Standard English (whatever that is), but still to be found in many dialects. The a- is originally a worn-down form of the preposition on. In OE a standard way of expressing a state was as a preposition phrase with on—on slæpe, for instance, "on sleep" = "in a state of sleep". We have quite a few common ...


18

According to the Cambridge dictionary, uttermost is the formal version of utmost, which suggests that utmost was originally regarded as some kind of abbreviation. You will find a definition of the origins of utter here. Languages were not designed by a team of engineers: they have evolved over millennia. As with humans, evolution values diversity: it does ...


10

You don't. English politeness is complex and hard to learn. However we don't use suffixes for names. We rarely use the "Mr" or "Mrs" prefixes, except in formal, written use. So If I know an older person and his name is Robert Smith, I call him "Robert". If I know him better I might know his nickname, in which case I call him "Bob" when talking to him or ...


9

Formally, it is the same prefix "in-". However, there are four different spellings that help pronunciation. The rule only depends on the first letter of the adjective: L — use "il-": illegal, illiterate; P, M, or B — use "im-": improper, immediate, imbalance; R — use "ir-": irresponsible, irrational; other consonants or vowels &...


8

Non-academic is a simple neutral statement of allegiance. Non-academic experience is one you gain outside of school. Non-academic license for software is different than "software for educational use only". Unacademic is inappropriate for academic standards. A paper that calls upon results of Tarot readings as source of prediction of construction durability ...


7

The "a-" prefix is not part of standard English grammar. It is used in some dialects of English (especially the American South, I think) with progressive present verbs that end with -ing. In my experience, it does not provide any extra meaning. It is usually written a prefix with a hyphen (not as a separate word): He's a-runnin', She's a-comin', We come a-...


6

There are only a few markers in English which make a question a "negative-polarity" question: No Not Nothing Never And any of their combined/contracted forms ("cannot", "don't", wasn't", etc.) If and only if any of these appear in the sentence, it is considered a negative-polarity sentence and the "agreeing" response uses "neither": I had no idea. ...


6

I think your hunch is right; multi-vegetable salad sounds a bit odd. This might be why: the phrase sounds redundant because a salad has multiple vegetables almost by definition: salad (n.) a dish, usually cold, of raw or sometimes cooked vegetables or fruits in various combinations, served with a dressing, or molded in gelatin, and sometimes with seafood,...


6

native English speakers tend to use the phrase "mixed salad". I realise the logic of your thinking but the phrase "multi-vegetable salad" would not be used.


6

These words are 'borrowed' from Latin, which routinely performed elision and assimilation on prefixes with a final consonant when the consonant was sufficiently similar to the initial consonant of the root to which it was attached. The resulting word was spelled with a doubling of the remaining consonant. pre- + fix- ... no final consonant, so prefix ...


6

"Unsupported" and "not supported" have the same meaning, but if you want to imply that it will be supported at some time in the future, you need to use the phrase "not yet", as in "not yet supported" or "not supported yet". It's quite all right for the "not yet" to be separated by the word it is qualifying, but it doesn't really make sense to use "yet ...


5

NOTE: This is off the top of my head; there may be aspects of this I've overlooked, so I would welcome any correction anybody wants to supply. You're missing a simpler way of understanding this, because you're working off letters (which should properly be enclosed in ‹› rather than []) instead of sounds (specifically, phonemes, which should properly be ...


5

The different parts of words that have different meanings are called MORPHEMES. A morpheme is the smallest part of a word that has its own meaning. So the morphemes in the word reviewed are: re (meaning again) view (meaning see) ed (usually indicating past) Sometimes there is a main part of the word, which we call the BASE or the ROOT. Bits that go before ...


5

This is indeed a dialectal feature of American English found especially in the Appalachian South, typically in rural areas among speakers of lower social status. I just happen to have a book on American English that describes this dialect feature rather nicely. From page 4 of American English 2nd Edition by Walt Wolfram and Natalie Schilling-Estes: In ...


5

When using the English language "always" is very rarely applicable. You will invariably find an exception to any rule. However, where the prefix de- is being used to indicate removal of something, as in your examples, the pronunciation is with a long vowel dee-. This applies in most regional variants of English. If the word simply starts with de, for ...


4

The prefix "anti" is acceptably pronounced both ways, however it is usually pronounced [antai] (or to a lesser extent [anti]) when stressed or emphasized, and [antɪ] as in 'lid' when said otherwise.


4

With adjectives that denote something changed in some way (especially past participles), un- is productive: you can use it freely to indicate that the change hasn't happened, or has been reversed): uneaten; unfinished; unpainted; unedited. With other adjectives, it is fairly common, but not paticularly productive: there is a more or less fixed list that ...


3

You didn't mention specific examples of words you have formed, so I can only answer generically. The answer is, yes and no. Yes, because English has no formal governing body that dictates what is correct or incorrect. Rather, "correctness" is determined by consensus usage. Although there are dictionaries and grammar books, lexicographers and grammarians ...


3

Affixes, like "un-", can be analysed in terms of how easily it is to form new word using them. Some are generally non-productive, for example "epi-" meaning "on" is a nonproductive prefix: You can't use "epidesk" and expect anyone to know what you are talking about. On the other hand "anti-" is very productive. If someone is strongly opposed to (for example)...


3

From more general to more specific, word formation (making new words) word derivation (making new words out of other words) word prefixation (making new words by putting stuff in front of an existing word or root) in- and mis- are called a prefix, as opposed to -ness or -ly which would be examples of a suffix. There are also other kinds of affixes, rarer ...


3

Why are there so many? Because English is partially derived from Romance languages that use both Latin and Greek root words, and Latin and Greek had a lot of numerical prefixes. Primary, Secondary, Tertiary: These are Latin ordinal prefixes. Pentagon, Hexagon, Heptagon: These are Greek cardinal prefixes. Billion, Trillion, Quadrillion: These ...


3

The thing to understand about "Multi" is that it wasn't a commonly used affix until somewhat recently, (as Google shows here), long after the word salad came into usage. As a result of "Multis" fairly recent rise in usage, there are a lot of terms that came about after the 1940s that use "multi" to show when we have several different objects creating one ...


3

Indiscoverable is a word, but it was never a common one, and it is getting less common. Short answer: Use "undiscoverable". It's much more common. Long philosophical answer: Whether something is in the dictionary or not is not a great way to decide whether it's "a word". Some dictionaries are very inclusive, and include every word that someone might ...


3

This a- prefix was derived from Old English, a time when there was a lot more inflection (see also this source). Some of these words will seem old-fashioned (and some of them are actually obsolete), which is why it seems poetic. Note that three of your words in the latter category are real English words (asail, abind, and adraw; adraw is obsolete). In ...


3

While I am inclined to agree with fixer1234's comment, having done a bit of research on all the words you mention it seems that all of them lead back to origins with dis/des prefixes. It's just some of these words have taken a few detours in definition which don't make that connection as clear as some of the words you mentioned earlier. For discover, the ...


3

You use 'multi-' to prefix a noun, not an adjective. So you would say a multi-day solution. Apart from that, you are perfectly correct in suggesting that multi- can be used to cover timespans.


3

Technically speaking, reedit is the more correct of the two, because it is a single word and should not have a space in it. Personally, though, I would not use either; re-edit is the only form that clearly marks it as a three-syllable word, with the ee not forming a digraph. The top answer to a very similar question on English Language & Usage ...


2

The negative prefix on the adjective does not matter, the tag question is determined solely by whether the verb is negative or positive. The correct usage would be "I am impatient, aren't I?" There are occasions for when you could use a positive-positive tag, but it's not really a question (the "up" inflection isn't there). It's used to confirm another ...


2

According to http://www.worldwidewords.org/qa/qa-unv1.htm words with a Germanic root use the un- prefix and words with a Romantic root use the in- suffix. There are also the prefixes a- as in asexual and non- as in nondescript. Unless you're a professor of linguistics and etymology I think your best bet is to use un-, which is the most common prefix, and ...


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